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Results for 'integrated care'

Results 31 - 33 of 33

Getting better outcomes: personal budgets and older people: follow up report, March 2015

ROUTLEDGE Martin, et al
2015

Presents the latest information about personal budgets for older people, showing that older people experience positive benefits from having a personal budget, although these are not as marked as for other groups. The first section reflects briefly on recent changes to the policy context and then highlights new data about the performance of councils from the recent 2014 ADASS survey, and the third National Personal Budget survey from In Control. It then draws on research and recent TLAP events, which considered minimum processes and self-directed support, to review what does and doesn't work best for older people. The second section of this report presents some examples of what councils are doing to address the ongoing challenges both of the initial report and the current policy context. The case studies are summarised in Table. Section 3 examines personalisation and safeguarding, and specifically, whether personal budgets increase risks to older people whilst section 4 considers integration and the opportunities that government policy affords older people in relation to personalisation. In its conclusion, the report recommends that there needs to be further evidence of what is being done to support the use of personal budgets by older people.

Inclusive integration: how whole person care can work for adults with disabilities

BROADBRIDGE Angela
2014

This report focusses on meeting the needs of working-age disabled adults as health and social care services are increasing integrated. It provides an empirical evidence base to demonstrate how whole person care (which is about making the connections between physical health, mental health and social care services) can be used to effectively meet these needs. The report also draws on the findings of a focus group with 12 disabled adults and carers on desired outcomes from the integration of health and social care services. Interviews with social care and voluntary sector professionals, commissioners and local authority policy to see if they are willing to include working-age disabled adults' needs in plans for future integration. The report looks at how working-age disabled adults have different needs and outcomes from older people and identifies the health inequalities they face in day-to-day life. Ten dimensions of health inequality are identified including housing, employment, financial security and quality of life. The report makes seven recommendations to inform the service response, including: taking a long term view of managing long-term conditions, viewing whole person care as a 10-year journey with matched by stable funding; debates on funding gap in social care should give consideration to the needs of working-age disabled adults; shifting resources from case management to community coordinated care to support prevention and providing a single point of contact for health and social care needs; service integration should take place across a much wider range of services to meet the needs of disabled people.

Developing the power of strong, inclusive communities

MILLER Clive, WILTON Catherine
2014

Sets out a strategy, which can be adapted locally, for how health and wellbeing boards can fulfil new wellbeing and prevention duties under the Care Act. The framework supports the development of strong and inclusive communities and indicates how people, communities and services can more effectively and efficiently work together to co-produce outcomes. The framework incorporates key areas of action for the health and wellbeing boards, which include: keep people at the centre and focus on their outcomes; focus on both assets and needs; focus on all levels of prevention; rethink integration; target people with two or more long term conditions; work through universal service providers; enable community and cross-sector systems leadership; develop a new approach to health and wellbeing strategies; and adopt a collaborative approach to priority setting and savings. The framework has been trialled with a number of trailblazer health and wellbeing boards each of whom refined and adapted it to reflect local circumstances.

Results 31 - 33 of 33

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