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Results for 'local authorities'

Results 11 - 20 of 37

The district council contribution to public health: a time of challenge and opportunity

BUCK David, DUNN Phoebe
2015

A contribution to the understanding, assessment and development of the role of district councils in improving the health of their citizens and communities. The report sets out what determines health, why district councils have an important role to play in shaping it, and the public health system and policy context in which district councils operate. It describes the key areas in which district council functions contribute to public health and provides a quick guide to the high level economics of public health for district councils. In addition, the report presents key evidence, including the impact on health, effectiveness and, where available, cost-effectiveness and return on investment, for each of the core functions of housing, green space and leisure, and environmental health services, arguing that district councils’ wider enabling role, in economic development, planning and engaging with their communities has benefits for health. A number of short case studies of innovation in service delivery in relation to health and wellbeing are also included. In the final section the report outlines a set of high-level recommendations for district councils and other stakeholders to ensure that they take advantage of the opportunities on offer.

Supporting the independence of older people: are councils doing enough?

THOMAS Huw Vaughan
2015

This report examines how effective councils in Wales have been in providing strategic leadership on older person’s issues. It analyses the Welsh Government’s and councils’ budgets, looking at the range and availability of preventative services across Wales, focusing on four core aspects that support older people to continue to live independently: practical support services; community based facilities; advice and information services; and housing and housing based services. The report also assesses councils’ performance management arrangements for overseeing services to older people, examining the information that is used by councils to judge performance. The review argues that Councils’ strategies and leadership focus too much on delivery of social services and do not always recognise the important contribution that other services can make in supporting and sustaining the independence of older people. Despite some innovative examples of councils supporting older people, the wider preventative services that can help reduce demand for health and social services are undervalued. A lack of data is making it difficult for councils to demonstrate the impact of their services in supporting the independence of older people, and this weakens their decision making and scrutiny when setting future priorities.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: part A: a guide for local authorities

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

The Care Act 2014 introduces a regime to oversee the financial stability of the hardest-to-replace care providers, and sets out measures to ensure people’s care is not interrupted if any social care or support providers fail. This guidance aims to help local authorities to fulfil their responsibilities in the event of provider failure by: helping them identify whether the failure of a provider will leave people at risk of being without a means of having their care and support needs met; where there is a risk, identifying those providers who are most important to meeting those needs, and; where the critical or hardest to replace providers are not within the Care Quality Commission Market Oversight Regime, assessing and taking action to reduce the risk of failure or the impact of a failure should one occur. The document begins looking at care markets and providers, introducing a suggested approach to categorising and segmenting care markets, as well as outlining the main reasons for provider failure. It then considers how to identify indicators of market sustainability and how to monitor hard-to-replace providers.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: part B: toolkit

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

Provides a framework to help local authorities implement a test of care market sustainability, and offers insights about when a provider requires further monitoring. Many local authorities have developed highly effective systems for gathering local market intelligence in relation to the part of the market with which they contract for services. This intelligence may be gathered both formally and informally and involve a broad range of approaches. This toolkit is designed to complement such approaches by providing a clear structure for local authorities to consider the totality of the local market, only a proportion of which they will directly contract with. There are five phases to the application of the toolkit: determining local market segmentation; evaluation of external indicators; evaluation of sub market composition indicators; forming a judgement on sustainability and deciding which ‘hard to replace’ providers to monitor; and understanding and monitoring the sustainability of ’hard to replace’ providers.

Dementia friendly communities: guidance for councils

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, INNOVATIONS IN DEMENTIA
2015

This guidance looks at current best practice and learning in the creation of dementia friendly communities, how it fits within the broader policy landscape, and what actions councils can take, and are already taking in supporting people with dementia by creating local dementia friendly communities. It illustrates how simple changes to existing services, and awareness raising for those who come into day-to-day contact with people with dementia such as staff working in libraries or in leisure centres, can help people with dementia feel more confident and welcome in using council services. The guide looks at what a dementia friendly community is, why dementia is a key issue for councils and the role councils can play. It then presents a framework to help develop to plan, develop and assess the dementia friendliness of any community, organisation or process. The framework covers five domains: the voices of people with dementia and their supporters, the place, the people, resources, and networks. For each domain information is included on: the background to the issue, key actions that councils can take to make this happen, and examples or case studies of existing practice. The guide for those who have a role in leading, planning, commissioning and delivering public services; including health and wellbeing boards, and those responsible for health and social care services.

Care Act: assessment and eligibility: strengths-based approaches

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2015

This guide summarises the process and the key elements to consider in relation to using a strengths-based approach. Sections provide information on what a strength-based approach is; the information practitioners need to carry out an assessment; using strength-based mapping; and key factors that make a good assessment. It also looks at how local authorities can extend the use of the strengths-based approach from assessments to meeting needs and provides a summary of core local authority duties in relation to conducting a strengths-based approach. It should be read in conjunction with the Care and Support (Assessment) Regulations 2014 and Chapter 6 of the 'Care and support statutory guidance', published by the Department of Health.

ADASS budget survey 2015: report

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2015

An analysis of the state of adult social care finances, providing in-depth intelligence on how adult social care is responding to the twin challenges of meeting increased demand and managing reducing resources. The survey seeks to explore the views of Directors of Adult Social Services across English Local Authorities on how councils are reconciling the growing numbers of people, often with increasingly complex needs, requiring care and support with the significant and sustained reductions in the funding available. The survey data sets out the concerns of councils in making increasingly difficult choices and the attempts to minimise impacts upon front line services. The report suggests that taking the growth in numbers of older and disabled people into account an additional £1.1 billion would be needed to provide the same level of service as last year. The care provision market is becoming increasingly fragile and 56 per cent of directors report that providers are facing financial difficulties. Many local authorities are going to have to pay more if providers are to be able to attract workers as unemployment falls. While directors see increased prevention and integration as their top two areas for savings for this year, next and beyond, many are struggling to balance investment in reducing future demand and costs at a time when budgets to meet existing statutory duties to provide care and support to those most in need are under such pressure. The paper calls upon the Government to urgently ensure that social care funding is protected and aligned with the NHS, including making provision for the social care funding gap alongside the funding gap for the NHS.

Emerging practice in outcome-based commissioning for social care: discussion paper

BOLTON John
2015

This paper is a progress report exploring the lessons learnt from a variety of approaches taken by councils to outcome-based commissioning in adult social care (sometimes called 'payment by results'). It considers some of the opportunities and risks that arise from taking this approach. The paper puts the emerging practice in social care in a context with other developments within the public sector; explores current practices in social care from a small number of councils and looks at the advantages and risks in taking this approach. It suggests that this approach could deliver better outcomes for people at a lower cost if the transaction costs can be limited. The paper draws on discussions with providers, commissioners and customers receiving services. The development of thinking in local authorities in recent times has shown a new emphasis on interventions that either prevent or reduce someone’s need for longer term care. This is supported by the evidence for the benefits from reablement for older people, the recovery model in mental health and the emerging progression model in learning disability services. Outcomes based commissioning is, in part, a natural evolution of the way in which commissioning might take place when a council is seeking improved outcomes for its customers as a result of the resources it purchases or deploys. The report argues that the overall expectation is that if a provider can produce outcomes for customers that may reduce their need for longer term care they should be rewarded. At the same time if fewer people need longer term care this will reduce the overall costs to the council. The benefits can then be shared between commissioners and providers of services.

Inside out and upside down: community based approaches to social care prevention in a time of austerity

MILLER Robin, WHITEHEAD Christine
2015

Reflects the experiences of six local authorities in the West Midlands who were identified by the regional ADASS group as seeking to deploy community based approaches within their prevention strategies. These approaches focus on opening up and sharing resources, insights and influence as a means to support individuals and local communities develop their capacity and resilience, shifting from a crisis solution model to a more preventative based social care system. The report begins with a short overview of the six community based approaches based on interviews with the leads in each local authority, and then pulls out key themes relating to the development of such approaches and lessons learnt. These are: community based approaches to prevention can take different forms; it is important to build on the local context; transformation of practice can be achieved in multiple ways; gathering relevant data is difficult but worthwhile; and genuine engagement and co-production with community and staff are central.

Local leadership, new approaches: how new ways of working are helping to improve the health of local communities

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2015

Examines how local authorities and health teams are working together to improve the health of local communities through prevention and early intervention. The report features seven case studies. Each one describes a particular programme or close partnership between a local authority and local public health or health care teams, often with the additional support of the voluntary sector. Each initiative focuses on a specific area and/or set of activities, including: integrating wellbeing; transforming the food culture in schools; helping people stay in their own homes; GPs linking people to other sources of support; healthy homes and housing conditions; promoting public health in schools; and active living.

Results 11 - 20 of 37

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