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Results for 'local authorities'

Results 11 - 20 of 42

Prevention in action: the extent to which English local authorities and health and wellbeing boards recognise and prioritise prevention, as defined within the Care Act (2014)

FIELD Olivia, CARTER Chloe
2016

Explores the extent to which local authorities and health and wellbeing boards across England recognise and prioritise the Care Act’s understanding of prevention. The study reviewed joint health and wellbeing strategies for the third year in a row, and made a Freedom of Information (FOI) request of all English local authorities to examine whether, and in which context, prevention was mentioned in the HWBs relevant documentation and how local authorities were implementing Section 2 of the Care Act. The Freedom of Information (FOI) responses indicate that local authorities are engaging with the Care Act’s triple definition of prevention, but this terminology has yet to be embraced by health and wellbeing boards. Both the FOI responses and joint health and wellbeing strategy review indicate that prevention is a key consideration in local decision making, including commissioning. However, while the review of joint health and wellbeing strategies indicates an improved understanding of prevention, tertiary types of prevention are still not being emphasised as much as primary and secondary prevention. In some cases, they are forgotten altogether. Many health and wellbeing boards are yet to place importance on preventative measures that could stop the deterioration or reoccurrence of a health or social care-related crisis by providing lower-level support. FOI responses and joint health and wellbeing strategies also emphasise the practical difficulties of shifting resources away from crisis intervention to prevention, especially in the current economic climate.

Just what the doctor ordered: social prescribing - a guide for local authorities

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2016

Social prescribing, sometimes called community referrals, is a way of enabling primary care services to refer patients with social, emotional or practical needs to a range of local community services and activities to improve their health and wellbeing. This publication highlights the role of local authorities in facilitating social prescribing and provides nine short case studies to show how councils are working across England.

Developing a wellbeing and strengths-based approach to social work practice: changing culture

GOLLINS Tim, et al
2016

This report discusses the need to for social workers in adult social care to change their workforce culture to one that is 'strengths-based' for promoting well-being, early intervention and prevention. It examines the value of this approach in creating better outcomes for people living more actively in their local communities, generating greater satisfaction for people using services and their carers; and creating a motivated workforce. The report then sets out the key knowledge and skills the social care workforce needs to apply strengths-based approaches in improving people’s lives. It also considers the emerging business case for how a community-focused strengths-based approach can deliver efficiencies for the sector. Cases study examples from Shropshire, Essex County Council, Hertfordshire and Calderdale show how councils and their health partners are developing new ways of working to deliver an alternative health and social care operating model.

Place-based health: a position paper

STUDDERT Jessica, STOPFORTH Sarah
2015

This position paper sets out some of the challenges in achieving a fundamental structural shift in the health system, citing new evidence from health and local government professionals. The paper sets out the potential of reimagining health as place-based, taking an asset-based approach and focusing on shaping demands in the longer term and ultimately producing better health and wellbeing outcomes. Underpinning this approach is the recognition of the wider determinants of health, where fewer health outcomes result from clinical treatment and the majority are determined by wider factors such as lifestyle choices, the physical environment and family and social networks. Place-based health would mean reconceptualising ‘health’ from something that happens primarily within institutions, to involve all local assets and stakeholders in a shift towards something that all parts of the community, and individuals themselves, recognise and feel part of. This would mean the individual would move from being a recipient of interventions from separate institutions to being at the heart of place-based health. The paper intends to lay out the challenge for the Place-Based Health Commission, which will report in March 2016 and recommend practical steps for professionals in health and care to overcome organisational barriers – real and perceived – and make a fundamental shift towards an integrated system that puts people at the heart of it.

Resilience in practice

WALKER Andrew
2015

This paper looks at what resilience means for local authorities and offers guidance for councils in their thinking about the subject. Resilience in this context is defined as the capacity of local areas to respond to immediate crises, to build their resources and adapt to changing circumstances in the future. The paper is based on an in-depth workshop with participants from local government across England, interviews with council officers with responsibility for resilience issues, and case studies that demonstrate some of the innovative approaches that could be taken to enable resilience. The paper begins by summarising existing understandings and definitions of resilience; discusses the issues and concerns that local authorities have with resilience; then looks at some of the ways they are seeking to develop it in their areas. Case examples include a project to develop community resilience in Hounslow and Family Group Conference programme in Camden which contributes to family resilience. The second section outlines a definition and typology of resilience and then applies the typology to the example of climate change. It then proposes a checklist that authorities could follow when developing resilience strategies and interventions. The paper stresses the importance of local authorities working with communities and individuals in partnership to make places more resilient, helping communities use their assets effectively and bringing about holistic change in the way communities function.

The district council contribution to public health: a time of challenge and opportunity

BUCK David, DUNN Phoebe
2015

A contribution to the understanding, assessment and development of the role of district councils in improving the health of their citizens and communities. The report sets out what determines health, why district councils have an important role to play in shaping it, and the public health system and policy context in which district councils operate. It describes the key areas in which district council functions contribute to public health and provides a quick guide to the high level economics of public health for district councils. In addition, the report presents key evidence, including the impact on health, effectiveness and, where available, cost-effectiveness and return on investment, for each of the core functions of housing, green space and leisure, and environmental health services, arguing that district councils’ wider enabling role, in economic development, planning and engaging with their communities has benefits for health. A number of short case studies of innovation in service delivery in relation to health and wellbeing are also included. In the final section the report outlines a set of high-level recommendations for district councils and other stakeholders to ensure that they take advantage of the opportunities on offer.

Supporting the independence of older people: are councils doing enough?

THOMAS Huw Vaughan
2015

This report examines how effective councils in Wales have been in providing strategic leadership on older person’s issues. It analyses the Welsh Government’s and councils’ budgets, looking at the range and availability of preventative services across Wales, focusing on four core aspects that support older people to continue to live independently: practical support services; community based facilities; advice and information services; and housing and housing based services. The report also assesses councils’ performance management arrangements for overseeing services to older people, examining the information that is used by councils to judge performance. The review argues that Councils’ strategies and leadership focus too much on delivery of social services and do not always recognise the important contribution that other services can make in supporting and sustaining the independence of older people. Despite some innovative examples of councils supporting older people, the wider preventative services that can help reduce demand for health and social services are undervalued. A lack of data is making it difficult for councils to demonstrate the impact of their services in supporting the independence of older people, and this weakens their decision making and scrutiny when setting future priorities.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: part A: a guide for local authorities

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

The Care Act 2014 introduces a regime to oversee the financial stability of the hardest-to-replace care providers, and sets out measures to ensure people’s care is not interrupted if any social care or support providers fail. This guidance aims to help local authorities to fulfil their responsibilities in the event of provider failure by: helping them identify whether the failure of a provider will leave people at risk of being without a means of having their care and support needs met; where there is a risk, identifying those providers who are most important to meeting those needs, and; where the critical or hardest to replace providers are not within the Care Quality Commission Market Oversight Regime, assessing and taking action to reduce the risk of failure or the impact of a failure should one occur. The document begins looking at care markets and providers, introducing a suggested approach to categorising and segmenting care markets, as well as outlining the main reasons for provider failure. It then considers how to identify indicators of market sustainability and how to monitor hard-to-replace providers.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: part B: toolkit

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

Provides a framework to help local authorities implement a test of care market sustainability, and offers insights about when a provider requires further monitoring. Many local authorities have developed highly effective systems for gathering local market intelligence in relation to the part of the market with which they contract for services. This intelligence may be gathered both formally and informally and involve a broad range of approaches. This toolkit is designed to complement such approaches by providing a clear structure for local authorities to consider the totality of the local market, only a proportion of which they will directly contract with. There are five phases to the application of the toolkit: determining local market segmentation; evaluation of external indicators; evaluation of sub market composition indicators; forming a judgement on sustainability and deciding which ‘hard to replace’ providers to monitor; and understanding and monitoring the sustainability of ’hard to replace’ providers.

Dementia friendly communities: guidance for councils

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, INNOVATIONS IN DEMENTIA
2015

This guidance looks at current best practice and learning in the creation of dementia friendly communities, how it fits within the broader policy landscape, and what actions councils can take, and are already taking in supporting people with dementia by creating local dementia friendly communities. It illustrates how simple changes to existing services, and awareness raising for those who come into day-to-day contact with people with dementia such as staff working in libraries or in leisure centres, can help people with dementia feel more confident and welcome in using council services. The guide looks at what a dementia friendly community is, why dementia is a key issue for councils and the role councils can play. It then presents a framework to help develop to plan, develop and assess the dementia friendliness of any community, organisation or process. The framework covers five domains: the voices of people with dementia and their supporters, the place, the people, resources, and networks. For each domain information is included on: the background to the issue, key actions that councils can take to make this happen, and examples or case studies of existing practice. The guide for those who have a role in leading, planning, commissioning and delivering public services; including health and wellbeing boards, and those responsible for health and social care services.

Results 11 - 20 of 42

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