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Results for 'local authorities'

Results 21 - 30 of 37

The bigger picture: understanding disability and care in England’s older population

LLOYD James, ROSS Andy
2014

Explores disability and care at a national, regional and local authority level in England. The report brings together data from Census 2011, DWP and HSCIC ‘administrative data’, as well as from Wave 6 of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, to look at the prevalence of disability, need and care of different types, and to paint a picture of the lives of different groups. In particular, Chapter 3 provides a snapshot of disability and care in the older population in England, identifying key results. Chapter 4 looks in detail at the lives of older people with limited day-to-day activities, from their health characteristics to their living situation. Chapter 5 explores the characteristics of older people receiving unpaid and paid care including the overall adequacy of their care, as well as older people with substantial levels of disability who experience difficulty undertaking three or more ‘activities of daily living’. Chapter 6 explores the interaction of older people experiencing limited day-to-day activities with public support, i.e. disability benefits and the local authority care and support system. Chapter 7 examines the prevalence of unpaid older carers and the outcomes they experience, as well as the extent of local authority support for them. The report shows that around half of the 65+ population in England reported their day-to-day activities were limited. Of the 6.7 per cent of the older population living at home in England who reported difficulty undertaking three or more activities of daily living, around 70,000 did not receive any care, and could therefore be classed as experiencing substantial unmet need. Around 20 per cent of older carers experienced self-care (ADL) difficulties themselves.

Getting better outcomes: personal budgets and older people: follow up report, March 2015

ROUTLEDGE Martin, et al
2015

Presents the latest information about personal budgets for older people, showing that older people experience positive benefits from having a personal budget, although these are not as marked as for other groups. The first section reflects briefly on recent changes to the policy context and then highlights new data about the performance of councils from the recent 2014 ADASS survey, and the third National Personal Budget survey from In Control. It then draws on research and recent TLAP events, which considered minimum processes and self-directed support, to review what does and doesn't work best for older people. The second section of this report presents some examples of what councils are doing to address the ongoing challenges both of the initial report and the current policy context. The case studies are summarised in Table. Section 3 examines personalisation and safeguarding, and specifically, whether personal budgets increase risks to older people whilst section 4 considers integration and the opportunities that government policy affords older people in relation to personalisation. In its conclusion, the report recommends that there needs to be further evidence of what is being done to support the use of personal budgets by older people.

Local area coordination: from service users to citizens

BROAD Ralph
2012

An exploration of how local area coordination can support people to pursue their vision for a good life, build stronger communities and help reform care services in England and Wales. Local area coordinators, from within their own local communities, provide information, advice and support to help people to solve their own problems. Instead of focusing on deficits, they help people focus on their own vision for a good life, building on their own assets and relationships and acting as a bridge to communities. The model is built on seven key principles, which include: citizenship; relationships; information; the gifts that each member of the community can bring; expertise; leadership; and services as a back up to natural support. The report argues that local area coordination offers the chance for the whole service system to rebalance itself and to focus on local solutions and stronger communities, whilst also offering a powerful catalyst to wider social care system reform.

The adult social care outcomes framework 2014/15: handbook of definitions

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
2014

This handbook sets out the indicators for measuring adult social care outcomes in 2014 and 2015 using the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF). The framework is designed to support councils to improve the quality of care and support services they provide and give a national overview of adult social care outcomes. The handbook provides technical detail of each measure, with examples to minimise confusion and inconsistency in reporting and interpretation. The indicators are structured around the four key domains set out in the framework, including: enhancing quality of life for people with care and support needs; delaying and reducing the need for care and support; ensuring people have a positive experience of care and support; and safeguarding people whose circumstances make them vulnerable and protecting from avoidable harm.

Commissioning for better outcomes: a route map

UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM. Health Services Management Centre
2014

Sets out standards for high quality commissioning to support a dynamic process of continuous improvement and, through self-assessment and peer review, to challenge commissioners and their partners, to strengthen and innovate to achieve improved outcomes for adults using social care, their carers, families and communities. There are 12 standards grouped into four domains, including person-centred and outcome-focused commissioning, inclusiveness, effective leadership and promotion of sustainable and diverse market place. They have been developed from a review of the available literature, the engagement of a wide range of stakeholders, the input from a project steering group coordinated by Think Local Act Personal, and an expert review of a final draft of the standards by local authorities and other key organisations. The prototype document will be piloted by a small number of local authorities and will shape and inform a new offer within the Local Government Association peer challenge programme which will become available in April 2015.

Wiltshire Council: help to live at home service: an outcome-based approach to social care: case study report

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
2012

The case study describes the process that Wiltshire Council has used to develop its new ‘Help to Live at Home Service’ for older people and others who require help to remain at home. The approach focused on the outcomes that the older people wish to gain from social care. It involved a complete overhaul of the social care system from the role of the social worker working alongside the customer to determine the required outcomes to the role of the providers of the service who must deliver these outcomes and receive payment based on that delivery. The report aims to promote discussion about how outcomes-based, personalised support can best work in social care in England in the future.

LGA Adult social care efficiency programme: the final report

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2014

This is the concluding report from the LGA Adult Social Care Efficiency (ASCE) programme. The programme was launched in 2011 in response to the significant cuts to council budgets and their impact on adult social care. The aim of the programme is to support councils to develop transformational approaches to making the efficiency savings required to meet the challenge of reduced funding. The report shares innovative and transformational examples of how councils are bringing together businesses, public sector partners and communities to develop lower-cost solutions to support the most vulnerable in our society. In particular, it outlines some key lessons around developing a new contract with citizens and communities, managing demand, transformation, commissioning, procurement and contract management, and integration. It looks at efficiency approaches in practice, with specific reference to assessment, advice and information, delivering preventative services, avoiding admissions and reducing costs of residential care, reducing costs in domiciliary care and transforming learning disability services. In addition, it considers local approaches to developing effective internal management, reshaping the service and working with partners, customers and suppliers.

Tracking your preventative spend: a step-by-step guide

WILKES Laura
2013

This toolkit helps councils to have a clearer understanding of how much of their budget is spent on prevention, how this contributes to the delivery of outcomes and what this means for increasing their activity towards early action programmes. It sets out the five steps to mapping and analysing spend: establishing a project sponsor and steering group; identifying and agreeing aims, objectives and scope of the project; understanding the outcome; mapping preventative services for the chosen outcome; and analysing and mapping budgets. It covers the practical steps taken and the outputs and challenges of each step. The toolkit draws on work carried out by the British Red Cross with the LGiU and Mears to support Camden Council to track their preventative spend against one of the council’s key outcomes from the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework: to keep older people living independently for longer. The toolkit provides a useful resource for councils, health and wellbeing boards and clinical commissioning groups.

Supporting commissioners of assisted living services: stage 1: research report

CONSILIUM
2014

This report presents the findings of research to examine the skills and knowledge that are unique to those commissioning assisted living technologies (ALT). These technologies include : telecare; digital participation services which educate, entertain and encourage social interaction to enrich the lives of people in need of social support; and wellness services which encourage people to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles. They are referred to collectively as assistive living services (ALS). The research methodology included desk based review of the evidence and consultation with a range of local authority commissioners in England. The report presents a summary of different commissioning models used, provides examples of good practice and what is working well, areas that need improvement and challenges facing commissioners. It also discusses workforce development issues and measuring impact.

Combatting loneliness: a guide for local authorities

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2012

Loneliness is a significant and growing issue for many older people.  Research over decades has found that acute loneliness has been consistently estimated to affect around 10-13% of the population of older people. Over the same time period, there has been a growing percentage of older people who sometimes feel lonely. Loneliness makes older people vulnerable to developing chronic health problems, depression and increases the need for social care services or residential care. This guide offers a brief summary of key research on the issue of loneliness, and some practical steps every local authority, working in partnership with other statutory bodies and their partners, can take to tackle loneliness, setting them in the context of an overall framework for action. The described framework comprises 3 tiers of actions: at the strategic level across the local authority; at the level of the community; and at the level of the individual. Suggested practical steps are illustrated by case studies drawn from around the country.

Results 21 - 30 of 37

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