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Results for 'loneliness'

Results 1 - 10 of 38

Ways to Wellbeing

York Council for Voluntary Service

Ways to Wellbeing York is a social prescribing service which aims to improve health and wellbeing through working with people referred by GPs to identify their needs and identify local services offering non-medical interventions which may be able to help. The pilot which started in 2016 offers a whole system approach to wellbeing, enabling people attending their GP to be referred to a range of support providing by over 40 voluntary and community services in the city. The service is hosted by York CVS and funded by the City Council and currently offers access to social prescription referrals through four surgeries in York based in areas of greater deprivation. The longer term aim if funding is secured is to provide a city-wide service with a target of 1,000 referrals.

Introduction to the research on: what works to improve social networks and prevent social isolation for people with mental health problems

HARFLETT Naomi, JENNINGS Yasmin, LINSKY Kate
2017

This short scoping review identifies research into what works to improve the social networks and prevent social isolation for people with mental health problems. Searches for the review were conducted on organisational websites and a range of databases, including Social Care Online, for UK based research published from 2000. The review provides an overview of the quantity and quality of the research and a table summarising the 24 studies reviewed and their key findings. It also provides a summary of areas identified for future research. The review found that the evidence around effectiveness of interventions to prevent loneliness and social isolation is patchy and findings are inconsistent. However, there is evidence to show that staff can play a key role in facilitating social networks and that activity-based interventions - such as horticulture, sport and learning - can increase social networks and reduce social isolation. The review also found that befriending may be beneficial to peoples’ mental health, but that there is inconclusive evidence on the impact of peer support.

Social isolation and loneliness in the UK: with a focus on the use of technology to tackle these conditions

IOTUK
2017

This report provides an overview of social isolation and loneliness in the UK and highlights innovative uses of technology in addressing the issue. It considers the factors that contribute to the development of social isolation and loneliness, the people most at risk, the impact on an individual's health and wellbeing, and the impact on public services. It outlines three main approaches and interventions used to address social isolation and loneliness: enabling people to maintain existing relationships, facilitating the creation of new connections, and psychological approaches to change the perceptions of individuals that are suffering from loneliness. In particular, it highlights innovative uses of technology to show their potential to increase access to initiatives and deliver interventions in new ways. Local and international best practice case-studies are included. The final section looks at the challenges that exist when trying to finance interventions aiming to combat social isolation and loneliness, and introduces an outcome-based financing model, Social Impact Bonds, which has the potential to allow commissioners and delivery partners to deliver more innovative solutions.

Cambridgeshire Community Navigators

Cambridgeshire County Council

The Community Navigator (CN) project began in 2012 as a key response to the views expressed by Cambridgeshire residents and stakeholders through the Ageing Well programme. From these events it was clear that there is a wealth of community and voluntary activity that supports older and vulnerable adults in the county, but what was missing was a countywide infrastructure, which at a local level, linked and supported people to access these activities.

No one should have no one: working to end loneliness amongst older people

MORTIMER Jill
2016

This report aims to raise awareness about the importance of addressing chronic loneliness amongst older people. It looks at recent initiatives of Age UK and includes early findings from ‘Testing Promising Approaches to Reducing Loneliness’, an Age UK programme with eight local Age UKs developed to services to find and help older people experiencing loneliness. Taking a community-based approach to combatting widespread loneliness the programme been successfully reduced isolation among the majority of trial participants. The programme identified learning in a number of areas, including: the benefits of building, developing and joining up local services rather than introducing a range of new services; the need for training to carry out guided conversations to identify people’s needs; that phone calls play an important role as part of a range of services; that there are costs involved in supporting networks and volunteers; and measuring levels and changes in loneliness. The report also highlights the action local councillors and MPs can take to prevent and tackle loneliness.

The crises facing our independent living service users: research, evaluation and impact

BLANCHARD Catherine, BRITTAIN Andrea
2016

British Red Cross Independent Living services such as Support at Home, Home from Hospital, and Mobility Aids provide time-limited support to help people live independently in their own home. This study explores the challenges facing people using these services, whose increasingly complex needs are creating greater obstacles to their ability to live independently. Phase one of the study conducted interviews with 29 service users, eight volunteers and 22 staff members into the problems service users face to living independently. Phase two used follow up questionnaires with 170 service users to explore key issues in more depth, including carers, mobility, information and advice, social isolation and loneliness. The results of the questionnaires found high levels of mobility reported-difficulties, which could impact on people's ability to maintain existing relationships and over half of respondents found difficult to find information and advice; The research also found that high numbers of service users live alone and also have high levels of social isolation and loneliness that require long-term intervention. Of the167 service users who answered questions on social isolation, 64 per cent experienced 'some' social isolation and a quarter fell into the 'most isolated' group. Drawing on findings, the report makes recommendations for the Independent Living service in relation to service development, advocacy and communications and data collection. These include: for services to be person-centred, consider partnerships and employ good practice in signposting; for the collection of data on whether people live alone, how long they have lived alone; and being clear in communications that loneliness and social isolation are different concepts.

Social isolation in mental health: a conceptual and methodological review: scoping review 14

WANG Jingyi, et al
2016

Social isolation and related terms such as loneliness have been increasingly discussed in the field of mental health. However, there is a lack of conceptual clarity and consistency of measurement of these terms and understanding of overlaps. This report provides definitions and brief explanations of relevant conceptual terms from the literature, and proposed a conceptual model covering different aspects of social isolation. Aspects of social isolation covered include loneliness, social support, social network, social capital, confiding relationships, and alienation. The conceptual model contains five domains to include all elements of current conceptualisations. These five domains are: social network: quantity; social network: structure; social network: quality; appraisal of relationships: emotional; appraisal of relationships: resources. It then proposes well established measures in the field of mental health for each conceptual domains of social isolation. The authors discuss the strengths and limitations of the approach. The developed model can help researchers and intervention developers to identify expected outcomes of interventions precisely and choose the most appropriate measures for use in mental health settings.

Trapped in a bubble: an investigation into triggers for loneliness in the UK

CO-OPERATIVES UK, BRITISH RED CROSS
2016

This research investigates potential triggers for loneliness across life stages, focusing on the causes, experiences and impacts of loneliness for six selected groups. It also looks at the support available for people experiencing loneliness, the services people would like, and how they would like that support to be delivered. The research focuses on: young new mums; individuals with mobility limitations; individuals with health issues; individuals who are recently divorced or separated; individuals living without children at home ('empty-nesters') and retirees; and the recently bereaved. It also draws on the views of experts and public opinion on loneliness gathered through a survey. The research found that the causes of loneliness of often complex, stemming from a combination of personal, community, and UK-wide factors. It also confirmed that people experiencing life events which can disrupt existing connections or change their role in society are at risk of loneliness. Other factors contributing to loneliness included: difficulty in accessing statutory services and support, the rapid disappearance of social spaces, and inadequate transport infrastructure. Loneliness can have physical, psychological and social impacts which can negatively impact on communities and people’s ability to connect. Experts recommend a combination of the following three models of support to tackle loneliness, depending on individual circumstances: preventative; responsive, which is shaped by the needs of those already experiencing loneliness and restorative, helping people to rebuild connections and prevent people slipping into chronic loneliness. Participants experiencing loneliness had a preference for face-to-face services, with digital services seen as important but supplementary. All those involved in the research supported the need for small, personal steps to help build community connectedness.

Testing promising approaches to reducing loneliness: results and learnings of Age UK's loneliness Pilot

AGE UK
2016

This report shares the results of Age UK’s loneliness pilot programme, which aimed to find out Age UK services could better reach older people experiencing loneliness, develop individually tailored solutions and help older people access activities and services within their community. Chapter one outlines origins of the programme, which involved eight local Age UKs in a 12 month pilot. Local services developed three common approaches: recruiting ‘eyes on the ground’ to identify older people experiencing, or at risk of, loneliness; developing co-operative networks with other agencies; and use of traditional befriending services. Chapter two highlights examples of services that local Age UKs are delivering and how the adoption of certain approaches improved their impact on lonely older people. Chapter three look at some of the impacts of the programme. It found that a large number of the older people supported during the programme experienced a reduction in their loneliness scores. This was especially true amongst older people who were often lonely. Some older people also identified feelings of increased independence, wellbeing and connectedness with people. Chapter four outlines the next steps for the Age UK programme.

The missing million: a practical guide to identifying and talking about loneliness

CAMPAIGN TO END LONELINESS
2016

A practical guide providing advice to help commissioners, service providers, frontline staff and volunteers to better identify and engage with older people experiencing, or at risk of experiencing loneliness. The guide draws on evidence from an earlier Campaign to End Loneliness Report 'The missing million: in search of the loneliest in our communities'. The first section outlines a range of data sources to help identify loneliness, including heat maps, the Exeter data system of patients registered with GPs, and a Community Insight tool developed by the Housing Associations Charitable Trust. It also explores how working with local communities and developing partnerships with individuals, groups and other agencies can help to help identify loneliness. Examples show how existing social networks in communities also have an important role to play in providing support and reducing loneliness. The second section provides recommendations on how best to engage with older people, highlighting the importance of understanding what loneliness is, having the right skills to talk to older people about loneliness, and providing appropriate support for the individual. Examples of effective and innovative approaches to supporting older people experiencing, or at risk of experiencing, loneliness, are also included. These include social prescribing, Talk for Health, and using social media and technology.

Results 1 - 10 of 38

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