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Results for 'loneliness'

Results 11 - 20 of 38

Local authorities + older people + arts = a creative combination

CUTLER David
2013

This report presents the case for local authority involvement in arts projects for older people. It sets out the benefits of participation in the arts for older people, it also argues that arts projects have additional benefits which can help local authorities deliver their own objectives at a time of increasing financial cuts. The report highlights five roles and interests of local authorities that makes them uniquely well suited to promote arts in the lives of older people. These are: improving the health and well being of older people, including reducing loneliness; arts and cultural services; integrating arts into older people's services and social care; social inclusion and community development; and leadership and coordination. Six case studies are included to illustrate the work that can be led or supported by local authorities. These include using arts to promoting mental and physical well being in St Helens; tackling loneliness in Fife; the provision of arts and social care services in Epping Forest; and leadership and coordination in Manchester. It also highlights relevant organisations and resources.

North and South London Cares. Evaluation and development through the Centre for Social Action Innovation Fund

RENAISI
2016

This report presents the findings from research and impact measurement of key projects undertaken by the North London Cares and South London Cares, demonstrating how the charities meet their core objectives of reducing isolation and loneliness amongst older people (and young professionals alike); improving the wellbeing, skills, resilience and connection of all participants; and bridging social and generational divides. The main projects comprise: Love Your Neighbour, supporting one-to-one friendships across social and generational divides; Social Clubs, aimed at older people who can still get out of the house, and want to interact with other older neighbours as well as local young people; Winter Wellbeing, a pro-active outreach effort that helps older neighbours to stay warm, active, healthy and connected during the most isolating time of year; and Community Fundraising, involving volunteers in major community fundraising effort through a ‘networked approach’. Drawing from the responses to a survey of new members (and follow up surveys), the report shows that there were little change for the scores for wellbeing for those who answered all surveys, except for an increase in anxiety. When looking at all responses, regardless of whether they stayed in contact for 12 months, the happiness score appears to be increasing, suggesting that some of those who were least happy dropped out of the survey. In the loneliness questions there was a decrease in the computed social loneliness score (questions about other people), but an increase in the emotional loneliness (questions about their sense of loneliness). The report also develops a new theory of change for the organisation, and sets out how to go about measuring impact against theory. The theory is based on five outcomes, which apply equally to both volunteers and older neighbours, and include: reducing isolation, improving wellbeing, increasing the feeling of belonging in the local community, living richer lives, and building bridges across social and generational divides.

Evaluation of the Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness grant fund: evaluation final report

ROBERTS Lauren
2016

Final evaluation of the Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness Grant programme, designed to encourage the voluntary and community sector (VCS) to develop innovative approaches to reduce social isolation and loneliness amongst Manchester residents aged 50 plus. The programme was commissioned and funded by North, Central and South Manchester Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), and administered and managed by Manchester Community Central (Macc). It awarded nine large (£10,000-£50,000) and eighteen small grants (less than £10,000) to local VCS organisations across Manchester's three Clinical Commissioning Group areas. This report provides an overview of the programme and discusses evidence of impact in the following areas: reducing social isolation and loneliness; improving confidence and independence; and improving health, wellbeing and quality of life. It also looks at learning from the project around identifying socially isolated and lonely people and engaging with, and retaining, people's involvement in initiatives. The evaluation reported increased social connections, with almost all respondents (97 per cent) meeting new people through the project; the creation of new friendships; increased quality of life; and improvements in self-reported health. It demonstrates that VCS-led model are capable of delivering desired outcomes and also highlights the importance of effective partnership arrangements between VCS umbrella organisations and CCG funders. Individual case studies showcasing learning and impact evidence from the individual projects are included in the appendices.

The future of loneliness: facing the challenge of loneliness for older people in the UK, 2014 to 2030

FUTURE FOUNDATION
2014

This report, commissioned by Friends of the Elderly, looks at the key factors likely to shape the future of older-age loneliness in the UK over the next 15 years. It identifies the challenges and opportunities in reducing loneliness and highlights possible interventions and preventative measures. The report draws on existing research resources, in-depth interviews with six older people who lived alone, and data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing and Government Actuaries' Department forecasts on age, marital status and partnership status. Areas discussed include: the implications of demographic change; wealth and work; leisure and social life; family and friends; the use of new technologies for contact and communication; and independence and connectedness at home. Key findings include: a connection between low contact with family members and loneliness, a link between poverty and loneliness; and the potential of technology to reduce loneliness.

Relationships in the 21st century: the forgotten foundation of mental health and wellbeing

MENTAL HEALTH FOUNDATION
2016

Examines how investing in building and maintaining good relationships and tackling the barriers to forming them positively impact on mental health and wellbeing. The evidence shows that people who are more socially connected to family, friends, or their community are happier, physically healthier and live longer, with fewer mental health problems than people who are less well connected. The paper looks at relationships across the life course and why they matter, focusing on children and young people, adults and later life. Higher rates of mental health problems such as depression and anxiety have been associated with loneliness, isolation and social rejection during adolescence and similarly having few close relationships has been linked to higher rates of depression and stress in older adults. The report calls on national governments, public bodies and employers to promote good relationships and tackle barriers, including mounting pressures on work–life balance and the impact of bullying and unhealthy relationships.

The missing million: in search of the loneliest in our communities

CAMPAIGN TO END LONELINESS
2016

A guide to help commissioners and service providers to develop ways of identifying older people experiencing loneliness or who are at risk of being lonely. Section one identifies methods of identifying older people who may be at risk of loneliness. These include top down approaches which use available data and data mapping to identifying geographical areas likely to contain more people at risk; and bottom up approaches, which draw on the local knowledge and capacity of communities to identify and engage with older people experiencing loneliness in their area. Section two illustrates how these different methods can be used and provides case studies to show how they have been used successfully by other organisations. Section three provides advice to help staff and volunteers to speak to people at risk of loneliness in a way that can bring about positive change. It shows the importance of using empathy, openness and respect when holding conversations and also taking a problem-solving approach to help people identify and plan their own solutions. Each section includes summary learning points and provides advice to help providers and commissioners to help change their ways of working. The report makes 10 key recommendations for service providers and commissioners.

At the heart of health: realising the value of people and communities

WOOD Suzanne, et al
2016

This report explores the value of people and communities at the heart of health, in support of the NHS Five Year Forward View vision to develop a new relationship with people and communities. It seeks to bring together in one place a wide range of person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing. It provides an overview of the existing evidence base with a particular focus on the potential benefits of adopting these approaches. The report suggests that there is evidence from research and practice to demonstrate the benefits of person- and community-centred approaches, across three dimensions of value: mental and physical health and wellbeing – these approaches have been shown to increase people’s self-efficacy and confidence to manage their health and care, improve health outcomes and experience, to reduce social isolation and loneliness, and build community capacity and resilience, among other outcomes; NHS sustainability – these approaches can impact how people use health and care services and can lead to reduced demand on services, particularly emergency admissions and A&E visits; and wider social outcomes: these approaches can lead to a wide range of social outcomes, from improving employment prospects and school attendance to increasing volunteering. They also can potentially contribute to reducing health inequalities for individuals and communities. The report includes an outline of the ‘Realising the Value’ programme, which is designed to develop the field of person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing by building the evidence base and developing tools, resources and networks to support the spread and increase the impact of key approaches.

Peer support for people with dementia resource pack: promoting peer support opportunities for people with dementia

HEALTH INNOVATION NETWORK SOUTH LONDON
2015

Bringing together examples of good practice and evidence-based guidance, the pack aims to help groups and organisations better support people with dementia in their communities. The pack was developed in partnership with leading dementia and older people charities, with contributions from Innovations in Dementia, The Alzheimer’s Society, AGE UK and Mental Health Foundation. The Health Innovation Network dementia team worked with people with dementia across south London to provide case studies and contribute to the films within the pack. The guide includes: information about what peer support is and how different types of groups can support people with dementia; why peer support can help people with dementia stay connected with their communities; guidance and resources to help people who want to run groups for or including people with dementia; and some ideas for how to tell if the group is doing well.

Only the lonely: a randomized controlled trial of a volunteer visiting programme for older people experiencing loneliness

LAWLOR Brian, et al
2015

Loneliness is a significant problem among older people living in Ireland. The negative effects of loneliness on physical and emotional health are well documented in the literature. This study was established in the context of a dearth of effective interventions to alleviate loneliness. A peer visiting intervention for community dwelling older adults experiencing loneliness was designed and subjected to the rigour of a randomised controlled trial. It consisted of ten home visits to the intervention participants from a volunteer, themselves an older person. The volunteer built up a rapport with the participant and encouraged them to identify a social connection they wished to establish. Several participants made new social connections outside their home while most continued to receive visits from their volunteer following the end of the study period. The main study finding was very positive. The primary outcome, loneliness, decreased in the intervention group at one month and three month follow up. Potential benefits for the volunteers were also identified, in particular a decrease in loneliness. Both participants and volunteers reported that they enjoyed the intervention. The intervention is low cost and could be incorporated into existing support services or non-government organisations caring for community dwelling older adults. It is a potentially scalable model to deal with the major societal challenge of loneliness.

People, places, possibilities: progress on Local Area Coordination in England and Wales

BROAD Ralph
2015

This report outlines the progress made in implementing Local Area Coordination in England and Wales between 2012 and 2015. This intervention aims to reduce demand for health and social care by intentionally working to support individuals, families, carers and communities to stay strong, diverting people from formal services wherever possible through sustainable, local, flexible individual and community solutions. The report, which include examples of implementation, stories of success and data describing the improved outcomes and efficiency, suggests that early development sites are demonstrating significant improvements in the quality of people's lives while also providing savings to public services. The stories in this report illustrate how Local Area Coordination: builds individual, family and community resilience; reduces demand for services; reduces isolation and loneliness; increases choice, control and contribution; builds inclusion and citizenship; is a catalyst for reform; and simplifies the system for local people. The report concludes with the suggestion that the strength of Local Area Coordination rests in its ability to act as a single, local, accessible point of contact - simplifying the system, reducing duplication and focusing on strength, inclusion, leadership and citizenship for all.

Results 11 - 20 of 38

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