#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'loneliness'

Results 31 - 38 of 38

'When I get off the phone I feel like I belong to the human race': evaluation of the Silver Line Helpline pilots

CENTRE FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE
2013

An evaluation of the Silver Line helpline and befriending service which was set up in response to loneliness and isolation of older people in the UK. The service has been piloted in the North West of the UK, and in the Isle of Man since the end of November 2012 and provides a helpline offering information, referrals to other organisations and someone to talk to 24 hours a day. The evaluation included a literature review, interviews by phone and in person, and fieldwork in the three call centres. The results found that the service was fulfilling its three key objectives of providing a referral service, delivering a befriending service to combat loneliness, and to help identify those who are vulnerable and may be suffering abuse or neglect. The evalution also highlights the skills and values that staff and volunteers considered to be essential when operating the service. Key recommendations for the future included extending the pilot across the country through partnership.

Preventing loneliness and social isolation among older people

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, CONTACT THE ELDERLY
2012

This At a glance briefing explains the importance of tackling social isolation and loneliness, particularly among older people. It highlights the adverse effects of feeling isolated and describes a number of services that have been found to help reduce the problem. It draws on research evidence from SCIE's 'Research briefing 39: preventing loneliness and isolation: interventions and outcomes'. It also includes case study examples of two services - a befriending scheme and social group - that help to help mitigate loneliness and isolation and improve the wellbeing of older people.

Loneliness and isolation: evidence review

AGE UK
2012

Loneliness and isolation are not the same. The causes of loneliness are not just physical isolation and lack of companionship, but also sometimes the lack of a useful role in society. Estimates of prevalence of loneliness tend to concentrate on the older population and they vary widely, with reputable research coming up with figures of 6%-13% of the UK population being described as often or always lonely. This evidence review has been produced in order to provide evidence to underpin decision-making for people involved in commissioning, service development, fundraising and influencing. It discusses: the policy context; what is known about loneliness and isolation in older people; and what has been done (including one-to-one services, group services, and community involvement) and how effective they were. The key messages from the evidence are listed.

Evidence review: loneliness in later life

DAVIDSON Susan, ROSSALL Phil
2014

A summary of available evidence from research on loneliness in the community in later life. Loneliness can be understood as an individual’s personal, subjective sense of lacking desired affection, closeness, and social interaction with others. Over 1 million older people say they are always or often feel lonely and nearly half of them say that television or pets are their main form of company. The report reviews the literature on measuring and quantifying loneliness and on factors associated with loneliness in later life, including age, ethnicity and language, sex, living arrangements and marital status, geography, housing, health, income, informal care and sexual orientation. The review considers the evidence on the impact of loneliness on older people and the most common social interaction interventions for older people. These include: specialised groups targeting older people, community engagement, befriending, gatekeeping, and the internet. The review includes an appendix on social support and its sources.

Combatting loneliness: a guide for local authorities

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2012

Loneliness is a significant and growing issue for many older people.  Research over decades has found that acute loneliness has been consistently estimated to affect around 10-13% of the population of older people. Over the same time period, there has been a growing percentage of older people who sometimes feel lonely. Loneliness makes older people vulnerable to developing chronic health problems, depression and increases the need for social care services or residential care. This guide offers a brief summary of key research on the issue of loneliness, and some practical steps every local authority, working in partnership with other statutory bodies and their partners, can take to tackle loneliness, setting them in the context of an overall framework for action. The described framework comprises 3 tiers of actions: at the strategic level across the local authority; at the level of the community; and at the level of the individual. Suggested practical steps are illustrated by case studies drawn from around the country.

Can a neighbourhood approach to loneliness contribute to people's well-being?: report

COLLINS Angela B., WRIGLEY Julie
2014

This report evaluates the overall impact of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation Neighbourhood approaches to loneliness programme. The main principles of the Neighbourhood approaches to loneliness programme are that community activities can contribute to the well-being of people at risk of, or experiencing, loneliness; that such people can play a central role in these activities; and that this involvement can also enhance community well-being. This report is based on consultation with community researchers, professional stakeholders, programme staff and community members. The report highlights that good practice requires skilled staff who are able to communicate effectively and provide pastoral support to volunteers; reveals changes in community researchers resulting from their involvement in the programme; demonstrates where there has been community impact; and shares wider lessons which can be learnt from taking a neighbourhood approach.

Building dementia-friendly communities: a priority for everyone

GREEN Geraldine, LAKEY Louise, ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
2013

The National Dementia Declaration for England (2010) identified that people with dementia want to live in communities that give them choice and control over their lives, provide services and support designed around their needs, and to feel valued and understood, and part of family, community and civic life. This report provides evidence of dementia-friendly communities in England, Wales and Northern Ireland from the perspective of people affected by dementia. It uses the results of a survey of people with dementia (510 respondents) distributed by Alzheimer’s Society staff and other networks in Autumn 2012 (referred to as the DFCsurvey) to explore the barriers that people face in their community, how they would like to be engaged in their local area, and the support they need to enable them to do so. Overall, the report aims to provide guidance to areas that are looking to become dementia-friendly, and to provide extra evidence for those already committed to becoming dementia-friendly. Evidence from people with dementia and their carers is collated alongside examples of projects that are making a difference for people with dementia. This information is used both to provide a definition of a dementia-friendly community, and to suggest 10 key areas of focus for communities to consider in working to become dementia friendly. These 10 key areas are: challenge stigma and build understanding; accessible community activities; acknowledge potential; ensure an early diagnosis; practical support to enable engagement in community life; community-based solutions; consistent and reliable travel options; easy to navigate environments; and respectful and responsive businesses and services. While there are some excellent examples of communities that are adapting themselves to the needs required by dementia, many people with dementia do not feel supported and a part of their local area; and are not able to take part in activities that they enjoyed before they developed the condition. Loneliness, feeling isolated and lack of confidence were identified as major barriers.

Ageing alone: loneliness and the 'oldest old'

KEMPTON James, TOMLIN Sam
2014

Loneliness occurs at all stages of life but little attention has been paid to its incidence and impact in the oldest old (85+), the fourth generation. This report begins by exploring: loneliness and why it matters; the incidence of loneliness in older people; and what is known about loneliness in the oldest old (85+). It then looks six contextual criteria that should be considered when initiating or commissioning interventions to tackle loneliness: rural and urban living; gender; health; living alone; community resilience; intergenerational interaction and ageism. Using case study analysis of projects that are tackling loneliness effectively, the report then explores practical steps that can be taken to reduce levels of loneliness among the oldest old. The case studies include one-to-one interventions, group services and building social networks; and encouraging wider community engagement. The case studies also illustrate the continued willingness of individuals of all ages to get involved in their local community. Whereas people might once have volunteered informally to help people they knew, ‘permission’ to initiate contact, through formalised and structured opportunities, is important. This is an important pointer as to how our modern society can organise itself to help address loneliness.

Results 31 - 38 of 38

#EXCLUDE#
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
Related SCIE content
Related NICE content
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#