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Results for 'music'

Results 1 - 7 of 7

Policy briefing: music, singing and wellbeing in adults with diagnosed conditions or dementia

WHAT WORKS WELLBEING
2016

Drawing on the available evidence, this briefing examines what music and singing interventions work to improve wellbeing of adults living with diagnosed conditions or dementia. While there is ample evidence looking at the impact of music and singing on clinical outcomes such as pain management, coping with hospitalisation, coping with symptoms and managing symptoms of dementia, this new evidence focuses on wellbeing for those living with diagnosed conditions or dementia. Specifically, it focuses on self-reported measures of quality of life; life satisfaction; and anxiety or depression. The paper suggests that there is strong evidence that brief music therapy is an effective intervention to support wellbeing of palliative care patients in hospital settings and initial evidence that music therapy can contribute to improved spiritual wellbeing in hospice patients. There is strong evidence targeted, culturally relevant music interventions can decrease depression in nursing students in a college environment and initial evidence that music therapy can alleviate anxiety in undergraduate students. There is promising evidence that targeted, culturally relevant music and singing interventions can enhance mental wellbeing and decrease depression in older people with chronic conditions in residential and community settings and initial evidence that participation in individual personalised music listening sessions can reduce anxiety and/or depression in nursing home residents with dementia and that listening to music may enhance overall wellbeing for adults with dementia. There is initial evidence that participation in extended community singing programmes can improve quality of life and social and emotional wellbeing in adults living with chronic conditions.

Systematic review: music, singing and wellbeing for adults living with diagnosed conditions

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

A systematic review of wellbeing outcomes of music and singing for adults, encompassing data from 1364 participants with identified health conditions such as stroke, COPD and mental health conditions. The review does not include clinical studies of music and singing, including interventions for patients in hospital, where the focus is on clinical outcomes such as pain management or coping with symptoms or hospitalisation. The evidence points to wellbeing outcomes including reduced depression and anxiety in people of all ages. In relation to adults with adults with chronic conditions such as stroke, COPD and cancer, the studies report reduced stress and improved wellbeing across a range of outcomes. Specifically, the review finds that there is high quality evidence that: targeted, culturally relevant music interventions can decrease depression in nursing students in a college environment; brief music therapy is an effective intervention to support wellbeing of palliative care patients in hospital settings. There is moderate quality evidence that: targeted, culturally relevant music interventions, including playing a musical instrument and singing, can decrease depression in older people with chronic conditions in residential and community settings; participants report a wide range of wellbeing benefits from singing including relaxation, distraction, reduction in anxiety, spiritual uplifting and improvements in mood, emotional wellbeing, confidence, enjoyment and a ‘feel good factor’; participation in a music project can raise participants’ awareness of the significance of music in their life. This in turn can have a positive effect on awareness of health and quality of life and can encourage behaviour change.

Systematic review: music, singing and wellbeing for adults living with dementia

VICTOR Christina, et al
2016

A systematic review of the subjective, self-reported wellbeing outcomes of music and singing in adults living with dementia. The review encompasses data from 249 participants in quantitative and qualitative studies from Australia, Canada, Finland, France, and the United Kingdom. It encompasses interventions focusing upon singing or listening to music. Three key domains of wellbeing are reported: quality of life, depression and anxiety. Studies and findings where the methodology entails observation by a researcher or clinician of the effects of music and singing on the wellbeing of people with dementia were excluded. In addition, the review excluded studies where the outcome was defined in terms of dementia or clinical symptoms or where the focus was on outcomes for carers. Given these caveats the key findings are that for people with dementia music and signing are important aspects of subjective wellbeing that can promote domains of subjective wellbeing, social connections and maintenance of identity. Active participation seemed to be less beneficial than listening to music but this is only a very tentative finding which needs support by further research. On the current evidence base, the review supports the development of policy and practice of support for music and singing interventions for wellbeing outcomes for people with dementia but suggests that interventions should reflect both active and passive forms of engagement.

Review of the grey literature: music, singing and wellbeing

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

This report reviews evidence from the grey literature on wellbeing outcomes for music and singing for adults. The evidence was received through a call for evidence placed on the What Works Wellbeing website in 2016. A total of 51 reports were received, of which 32 met the inclusion criteria. These included: 12 reports on music and singing interventions with healthy adults; 12 reports on participants with a range of diagnosed conditions including COPD, Parkinson’s, stroke and mental health conditions; and eight reports on participants living with dementia. An additional five unpublished PhDs were also identified. The report summarises the evaluation methods used in the projects; quantitative and qualitative wellbeing outcomes identified; and process evaluations carried out. The review found evidence of improved mental wellbeing in evaluations of two singing interventions for people in the community experiencing, or at risk of, mental health problems. Two studies of music interventions for older participants in hospital also reported improvements in observed wellbeing. Qualitative findings also suggest that participants involved in singing and music projects report positive outcomes such as improved mood, purpose and social interaction. Adults with dementia also experienced increased engagement, relaxation, and better connection with others. Key issues reported from process evaluations included: barriers to activity, such as lack of accessible transport; institutional barriers, particularly in care home settings where projects rely on the support of care staff and managers. Limitations of the evidence are also briefly discussed.

Evaluation of Music in Mind: findings to date

NEW ECONOMY
2014

This report details the interim findings of the evaluation of the third phase of the Music in Mind (MiM) project. MiM is a music therapy group run by Manchester Camerata that offers free music therapy sessions for people with dementia (PWD) and their carers. The sessions aim to improve the quality of life and wellbeing of the attendees through music making. The report provides a brief introduction to the MiM project and summarises the findings of a literature review. It then presents the participants’ views of the MiM, as recorded in their diaries or communicated through interviews, and discusses key findings. The key themes that emerge from the evaluation are linked to the mood of the service users: feeling calmer, happier, energised and/or relaxed. Improvements were also noted in PWD’s memory and recollection, confidence levels and relationships with carers. However the extent of other benefits appears to vary greatly depending on the type of dementia the service users’ are living with and the severity of their symptoms. The findings of this evaluation seem to be in line with the literature, suggesting that MIM appears to promote general wellbeing amongst participants and have a positive impact on relationships.

Tackling loneliness in older age: the role of the arts

CUTLER David
2012

This report looks at the scale and impact of loneliness among older people and argues that the arts are a powerful tool to tackle the problem. It suggests that older people need a broad range of opportunities and activities to help them maintain healthy social relationships. These can include care and befriending support, but just as important are opportunities that connect them to their communities, such as faith, learning, fitness, leisure and cultural activities. The arts are an effective way to tackle loneliness but can be overlooked by older people’s services. The report provides some practical actions for this activity to be increased and a list of resources. It contains an appended series of ten case studies drawn from some of the arts organisations currently funded by the Baring Foundation. These illustrate some of the many ways in which the arts can make a difference: in rural locations or in the inner city, in a residential care home, a community or an arts venue, through reinventing the tradition of the tea dance for the 21st century or in a major new festival.

Singing for successful ageing: the perceived benefits of participating in the Golden Oldies community-arts programme

TEATER Barbara, BALDWIN Mark
2014

Community-based preventative programmes are increasing in demand as the UK seeks alternative ways of supporting the growing number of older adults. As the use and promotion of preventative programmes increase, so does the need for evidence supporting their effectiveness. Through the use of mixed methods, this study explored a singing community-arts programme, the Golden Oldies, to determine the extent to which the programme contributes to participants' (n = 120) sense of health, self-development and social connectedness. Quantitative analyses found that between 73.1 and 98.3 per cent of participants agreed or strongly agreed that the Golden Oldies contributed to their self-development, health and sense of community as well as revealing a statistically significant increase in self-reported health prior to participation in the programme to the time of the study. Qualitative analysis (n = 5) revealed three themes—the Golden Oldies as: (i) a reduction in social isolation and increase in social contact; (ii) a therapeutic source; and (iii) a new lease for life. The results provide evidence of the preventative nature of the Golden Oldies programme through self-reported improvements in health and social relationships where social connections appeared to be the important thread that contributed to the perceived benefits. Implications for policy, practice and research are discussed.

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