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Results for 'needs'

Results 1 - 7 of 7

The crises facing our independent living service users: research, evaluation and impact

BLANCHARD Catherine, BRITTAIN Andrea
2016

British Red Cross Independent Living services such as Support at Home, Home from Hospital, and Mobility Aids provide time-limited support to help people live independently in their own home. This study explores the challenges facing people using these services, whose increasingly complex needs are creating greater obstacles to their ability to live independently. Phase one of the study conducted interviews with 29 service users, eight volunteers and 22 staff members into the problems service users face to living independently. Phase two used follow up questionnaires with 170 service users to explore key issues in more depth, including carers, mobility, information and advice, social isolation and loneliness. The results of the questionnaires found high levels of mobility reported-difficulties, which could impact on people's ability to maintain existing relationships and over half of respondents found difficult to find information and advice; The research also found that high numbers of service users live alone and also have high levels of social isolation and loneliness that require long-term intervention. Of the167 service users who answered questions on social isolation, 64 per cent experienced 'some' social isolation and a quarter fell into the 'most isolated' group. Drawing on findings, the report makes recommendations for the Independent Living service in relation to service development, advocacy and communications and data collection. These include: for services to be person-centred, consider partnerships and employ good practice in signposting; for the collection of data on whether people live alone, how long they have lived alone; and being clear in communications that loneliness and social isolation are different concepts.

Trapped in a bubble: an investigation into triggers for loneliness in the UK

CO-OPERATIVES UK, BRITISH RED CROSS
2016

This research investigates potential triggers for loneliness across life stages, focusing on the causes, experiences and impacts of loneliness for six selected groups. It also looks at the support available for people experiencing loneliness, the services people would like, and how they would like that support to be delivered. The research focuses on: young new mums; individuals with mobility limitations; individuals with health issues; individuals who are recently divorced or separated; individuals living without children at home ('empty-nesters') and retirees; and the recently bereaved. It also draws on the views of experts and public opinion on loneliness gathered through a survey. The research found that the causes of loneliness of often complex, stemming from a combination of personal, community, and UK-wide factors. It also confirmed that people experiencing life events which can disrupt existing connections or change their role in society are at risk of loneliness. Other factors contributing to loneliness included: difficulty in accessing statutory services and support, the rapid disappearance of social spaces, and inadequate transport infrastructure. Loneliness can have physical, psychological and social impacts which can negatively impact on communities and people’s ability to connect. Experts recommend a combination of the following three models of support to tackle loneliness, depending on individual circumstances: preventative; responsive, which is shaped by the needs of those already experiencing loneliness and restorative, helping people to rebuild connections and prevent people slipping into chronic loneliness. Participants experiencing loneliness had a preference for face-to-face services, with digital services seen as important but supplementary. All those involved in the research supported the need for small, personal steps to help build community connectedness.

Making progress on personal and joined up support: report of a roundtable discussion. Implementing the NICE guideline on older people with social care needs and multiple long-term conditions (NG22)

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
2016

This report summarises discussions from a roundtable event attended by older people and carer representatives, practitioners, providers and commissioners to identify how the NICE guideline on supporting older people with multiple long-term conditions and their carers could best be used and implemented. It also sets out practical examples, actions and ideas to help improve local practice. Small groups discussed how the guideline can help achieve three priorities that the Guideline Committee identified as most important for potential impact and the likely significant challenges. These were: empowering older people and carers; empowering health and social care practitioners; and integration of different care and support options to enable person-centred care. Suggested actions and practice examples in each of the three priority areas.

Fit for frailty: consensus best practice guidance for the care of older people living with frailty in community and outpatient settings

TURNER Gillian
2014

The first of a two-part guidance on the recognition and management of older patients with frailty in community and outpatient settings. This guide has been produced in association with the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) and Age UK and aims to be an invaluable tool for social workers, ambulance crews, carers, GPs, nurses and others working with older people in the community. The guidance will help them to recognise the condition of frailty and to increase understanding of the strategies available for managing it. In the guidelines, the British Geriatrics Society (BGS) calls for all those working with older people to be aware of, and assess for frailty. It dispels the myth that all older people are frail and that frailty is an inevitable part of age. It also highlights the fact that frailty is not static. Like other long term conditions it can fluctuate in severity.

Building community-based support with older people: evidence from other research reports

OUTSIDE THE BOX
2015

This report, developed as a resource for community groups, draws on recent key reports, discussion papers and research studies to present evidence on creating and sustaining community-based support for older people, including those which older people lead. It provides definitions of terms and approaches used in community-based support; outlines the current the policy context in Scotland; and then provides an overview of the main findings on community capacity building, changes in public services and the impacts for older people. Points raised in the evidence include: older people who need extra support generally know what will make life better for them; community-based activities that focus on older people's wellbeing complement other services; and that providing community-based solutions and low-level support to older people before they need greater support can prevent or reduce the need for higher intensity services, bring benefits and better outcomes to the people involved. The final section summarises findings from the individual reports and research reviews identified. Although the policy and practice context for the report focuses on the situation in Scotland, most of the reports featured in the review come from the experience of services based in England.

Care Act 2014: a strengths-based approach

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2015

One of the aims of the Care Act 2014 is to promote people's wellbeing and independence. By using a strengths-based approach to the assessment process, people can be supported to understand their needs, realise what they can do, and how to best use their skills and networks, to achieve their outcomes. This film looks at what is meant by a strengths-based approach and how practitioners through the assessment process can enable people to be at the centre of their own care and support needs.

Improving later life: services for older people: what works

AGE UK
2014

This report presents jargon-free summaries of research on key aspects of services for older people, each written by experts in their field. It also draws out seven major themes from the research covering service design, the role of carers, the need for regular assessment, and the importance of social interaction. Contributors cover the following areas: service cost-effectiveness, what works in integrating health and care, dignity of older service users, safeguarding, supporting older people and their carers, council managed personal budgets, paying for social care, involving older people in evaluation and research, preventing isolation and loneliness, promoting inclusion in rural communities, housing with care, home telecare, supporting older people in the community, services for men, falls prevention, assistive technology for people with dementia, cognitive stimulation therapy for people with dementia, and memory services.

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