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Results for 'older people'

Results 11 - 20 of 141

Social isolation and loneliness in the UK: with a focus on the use of technology to tackle these conditions

IOTUK
2017

This report provides an overview of social isolation and loneliness in the UK and highlights innovative uses of technology in addressing the issue. It considers the factors that contribute to the development of social isolation and loneliness, the people most at risk, the impact on an individual's health and wellbeing, and the impact on public services. It outlines three main approaches and interventions used to address social isolation and loneliness: enabling people to maintain existing relationships, facilitating the creation of new connections, and psychological approaches to change the perceptions of individuals that are suffering from loneliness. In particular, it highlights innovative uses of technology to show their potential to increase access to initiatives and deliver interventions in new ways. Local and international best practice case-studies are included. The final section looks at the challenges that exist when trying to finance interventions aiming to combat social isolation and loneliness, and introduces an outcome-based financing model, Social Impact Bonds, which has the potential to allow commissioners and delivery partners to deliver more innovative solutions.

The shed effect: stories from shedders in Scotland

AGE SCOTLAND
2017

This report outlines the positive impact that the growing men’s shed movement is having on later life, and how it is improving men’s health and wellbeing. It gathered individual stories, experiences and observations from 8 men’s sheds, recording 30 individual conversations with shedders, to find out why sheds work for them. It also held 2 conversations with shed supporters. Using direct quotations from the conversations, the report looks at the following themes: how people got involved in their shed; what makes the shed work for them; the importance of sheds as a place to develop new skills and knowledge; the social, health and welfare benefits – including the development of friendships and reduction in loneliness and social isolation; and the positive impact on communities, such as helping other community groups and promoting connections between the generations. The personal stories may be helpful in promoting the benefits of sheds other men and other communities, raising awareness of the shed movement amongst the general public, and providing funders and policy makers with a better understanding of the importance of men’s sheds’ importance, and of why they should continue to value and support them.

HenPower

Equal Arts

“I’ve made some great friends through HenPower. What I like about HenPower is that you’re not entertained, you’re involved” (Tommy Appleby, 91, Hensioner, member of HenPower). HenPower was developed by Equal Arts in 2011 as a pilot project, funded by the Big Lottery Silver Dreams Programme with clear outcomes: to both assist and improve the health and wellbeing, and reduce the loneliness of thirty older people, specifically men. These activities were coupled by the project aiming to demonstrate the benefits of keeping hens in care homes alongside taking part in creativity and as ‘Hensioners’, introduce the hen-related activities and arts sessions to the wider community, such as school children. A Hensioner, like Tommy Appleby, fulfils the role of an active HenPower volunteer who can their use existing skills and knowledge to develop an expertise in hen-keeping. When the project was piloted, the eligibility of recruiting each Hensioner was that they had an interest to help others, who are less able then themselves. As champions of HenPower, the project established in care settings through volunteers, artists and project workers meeting with each of the care staff, residents and relatives to introduce creativity and hen-keeping in north-east England.

Health, care and housing workshop

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER, ANCHOR, HANOVER
2017

Summarises discussions from workshop with people across the health, care and housing sectors to develop joint solutions to enable people to live independently for longer and alleviate pressure on the NHS and social care. The workshops aimed to identify the blockages preventing integration between health, care and housing; solutions to transform the system; and the implications for housing supply, commissioning decisions and care pathways. The three fictional personas were used to explore the experiences of individuals through the current health, care and housing system, and to identify what this might look like in an ideal world. Seven main themes emerged from the discussions: learning from good practice, focussing on the individual and their outcomes, rather than systems and cost savings; leadership from Government in relation to older people and older people’s housing; differences between housing and health that can create barriers to joint working; a more active role for local government and local citizens; the need to monitor the impact of early intervention and prevention; and improvements in current and new housing stock. A list of key actions and links to examples of good practice are included.

North London Cares and South London Cares

North London Cares/ South London Cares

North London Cares (NLC) and South London Cares (SLC) are community networks mobilising young professionals to volunteer to spend time with and support their older neighbours in Camden and Islington (NLC) and Lambeth and Southwark (SLC), in order to reduce loneliness and isolation amongst older people (and young professionals alike); to improve the skills, confidence, wellbeing and resilience so that all participants can better navigate the rapidly changing modern world; and to reduce the division across social and generational divides in London.

Music In Mind Camerata in the Community

Manchester Camerata

Manchester Camerata’s involvement with older members of the community began almost ten years ago, in which they ran music composition sessions for people living in care homes alongside Age Friendly Manchester. Since 2012, Camerata runs a programme entitled ‘Music in Mind’, a music-therapy based project for people living with dementia and their carers. This was in response to a growing number of people living with dementia in Greater Manchester, and an interest from Camerata orchestral musicians to deliver this work in partnership with Music Therapists.

ExtraCare's Wellbeing Programme

The ExtraCare Charitable Trust

ExtraCare’s Wellbeing Programme was developed in 2002, in partnership with older people who live at ExtraCare’s Schemes and Villages. The concept was launched following a survey, which highlighted that 75% of residents at one location had not accessed any health screening via their GPs or the NHS. A pilot screening scheme subsequently identified 122 previously undetected conditions amongst a population of just 136, highlighting a clear need for the Programme.

Care Homes Reading Project

University of Exeter

The Exeter Care Homes Reading Project began in the English Department at Exeter University in October 2011. Pioneered by Dr Johanna Harris and strongly supported by the student-led English Society, the Project quickly became one of the University’s most successful student volunteer initiatives. The project aim is to strengthen links between young adults and older people, and to promote understanding, recognising that positive intergenerational relationships are key to a healthy community. Through a shared love of stories and poems, the conversations they spark and the human emotions they speak of and into, common ground is found.

No one should have no one: working to end loneliness amongst older people

MORTIMER Jill
2016

This report aims to raise awareness about the importance of addressing chronic loneliness amongst older people. It looks at recent initiatives of Age UK and includes early findings from ‘Testing Promising Approaches to Reducing Loneliness’, an Age UK programme with eight local Age UKs developed to services to find and help older people experiencing loneliness. Taking a community-based approach to combatting widespread loneliness the programme been successfully reduced isolation among the majority of trial participants. The programme identified learning in a number of areas, including: the benefits of building, developing and joining up local services rather than introducing a range of new services; the need for training to carry out guided conversations to identify people’s needs; that phone calls play an important role as part of a range of services; that there are costs involved in supporting networks and volunteers; and measuring levels and changes in loneliness. The report also highlights the action local councillors and MPs can take to prevent and tackle loneliness.

Reducing delayed transfer of care through housing interventions: evidence of impact. Case study

ADAMS Sue
2016

A case study and independent evaluation of a housing intervention designed to help older patients to return home from hospital more rapidly and safety. The initiative is delivered by West of England Care & Repair (WE C&R), who organise clutter clearance/deep cleaning; urgent home repairs, emergency heating repairs and essential housing adaptations for older people in hospital. The evaluation examined all case records, interviewed 15 hospital staff and undertook an in depth analysis of a sample of 4 cases. Analysis of the case records estimated a saving in hospital bed days of £13,526. The cost of housing interventions was £948, resulting in a cost benefit ratio of 14:1. Additional savings in hospital staff time amounted to a further £897. A short case study illustrates how the service was able to help one woman return home from hospital. It concludes that the small scale evaluation is indicative of the potential savings that a practical and effective home from hospital housing intervention service can generate for the health service.

Results 11 - 20 of 141

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