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Results for 'outcomes'

Results 1 - 10 of 26

Peer support in accommodation based support services: a social return on investment

NEWTON Angela, WOMER Jessica, WHATMOUGH Suzy
2017

This evaluation assessed the peer support delivered across three accommodation services in Hampshire to understand the ways in which it impacted people’s lives and what they valued most about it. The services provided support for people experiencing mental distress, many of who had multiple complex needs. A total of 12 volunteers delivered peer support both on-to-one support and group peer support. A total of 22 people completed questionnaires for the evaluation, which included 12 services users (71 per cent of all service users who had used peer support), and 10 Peer Supporters (83 per cent of all Peer Supporters). Costs of providing peer support and the number of hours of direct support provided by peer supporters were also collected. From this, the return on investment in peer support was calculated using a methodology for measuring the equivalent worth of activity in social terms. The results found that the majority of peer supporters and service users who took part in the study had improved levels of confidence, felt more able to manage their mental health; had an improved social life and support network; felt more accepted; and felt more hopeful about the future. It also calculated that every pound spent on peer support provided a social return worth £4.94. The findings demonstrate that peer support is valued by those involved and helps support people to achieve their outcomes and lead more independent and fulfilling lives. The results of the study will also help communicate the value of peer support in financial terms to with commissioners and funders.

Systematic review: music, singing and wellbeing for adults living with diagnosed conditions

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

A systematic review of wellbeing outcomes of music and singing for adults, encompassing data from 1364 participants with identified health conditions such as stroke, COPD and mental health conditions. The review does not include clinical studies of music and singing, including interventions for patients in hospital, where the focus is on clinical outcomes such as pain management or coping with symptoms or hospitalisation. The evidence points to wellbeing outcomes including reduced depression and anxiety in people of all ages. In relation to adults with adults with chronic conditions such as stroke, COPD and cancer, the studies report reduced stress and improved wellbeing across a range of outcomes. Specifically, the review finds that there is high quality evidence that: targeted, culturally relevant music interventions can decrease depression in nursing students in a college environment; brief music therapy is an effective intervention to support wellbeing of palliative care patients in hospital settings. There is moderate quality evidence that: targeted, culturally relevant music interventions, including playing a musical instrument and singing, can decrease depression in older people with chronic conditions in residential and community settings; participants report a wide range of wellbeing benefits from singing including relaxation, distraction, reduction in anxiety, spiritual uplifting and improvements in mood, emotional wellbeing, confidence, enjoyment and a ‘feel good factor’; participation in a music project can raise participants’ awareness of the significance of music in their life. This in turn can have a positive effect on awareness of health and quality of life and can encourage behaviour change.

Systematic review: music, singing and wellbeing for adults living with dementia

VICTOR Christina, et al
2016

A systematic review of the subjective, self-reported wellbeing outcomes of music and singing in adults living with dementia. The review encompasses data from 249 participants in quantitative and qualitative studies from Australia, Canada, Finland, France, and the United Kingdom. It encompasses interventions focusing upon singing or listening to music. Three key domains of wellbeing are reported: quality of life, depression and anxiety. Studies and findings where the methodology entails observation by a researcher or clinician of the effects of music and singing on the wellbeing of people with dementia were excluded. In addition, the review excluded studies where the outcome was defined in terms of dementia or clinical symptoms or where the focus was on outcomes for carers. Given these caveats the key findings are that for people with dementia music and signing are important aspects of subjective wellbeing that can promote domains of subjective wellbeing, social connections and maintenance of identity. Active participation seemed to be less beneficial than listening to music but this is only a very tentative finding which needs support by further research. On the current evidence base, the review supports the development of policy and practice of support for music and singing interventions for wellbeing outcomes for people with dementia but suggests that interventions should reflect both active and passive forms of engagement.

Review of the grey literature: music, singing and wellbeing

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

This report reviews evidence from the grey literature on wellbeing outcomes for music and singing for adults. The evidence was received through a call for evidence placed on the What Works Wellbeing website in 2016. A total of 51 reports were received, of which 32 met the inclusion criteria. These included: 12 reports on music and singing interventions with healthy adults; 12 reports on participants with a range of diagnosed conditions including COPD, Parkinson’s, stroke and mental health conditions; and eight reports on participants living with dementia. An additional five unpublished PhDs were also identified. The report summarises the evaluation methods used in the projects; quantitative and qualitative wellbeing outcomes identified; and process evaluations carried out. The review found evidence of improved mental wellbeing in evaluations of two singing interventions for people in the community experiencing, or at risk of, mental health problems. Two studies of music interventions for older participants in hospital also reported improvements in observed wellbeing. Qualitative findings also suggest that participants involved in singing and music projects report positive outcomes such as improved mood, purpose and social interaction. Adults with dementia also experienced increased engagement, relaxation, and better connection with others. Key issues reported from process evaluations included: barriers to activity, such as lack of accessible transport; institutional barriers, particularly in care home settings where projects rely on the support of care staff and managers. Limitations of the evidence are also briefly discussed.

The role of advice services in health outcomes: evidence review and mapping study

PARKINSON Andy, BUTTRICK Jamie
2015

Evidence review, undertaken through a joint project between the Low Commission and the Advice Services Alliance, to examine the impact of social welfare advice services on health outcomes. The review outlines key findings from 140 research studies and also provides an overview of 58 integrated health and welfare advice services. Advice services covered in the review included those providing advice on debts, welfare benefits, housing, employment and discrimination advice. The results of the evidence review are discussed across the following areas: health inequalities; debt and mental health; primary care; secondary and tertiary care, including mental health services. The analysis finds that welfare advice provided in health context results in better individual health and well-being and lower demand for health services. Positive effects on health and welbeing include: lower stress and anxiety, better sleeping patterns, more effective use of medication, smoking cessation, and improved diet and physical activity. It shows how the right welfare advice in the right place produces real benefits for patient health especially where advice services work directly with the NHS and care providers, and presents evidence to show that early and effective advice provision reduces demand on the NHS. It provides recommendations for NHS, Local Authority Commissioners, Health and Wellbeing Boards, and the advice sector for the use welfare advice services to improve health outcomes, address health inequalities and reduce demand on the NHS.

The art of commissioning: how commissioners can release the potential of the arts and cultural sector

SLAY Julia, ELLIS-PETERSEN Madeleine
2016

Drawing the experiences from two pilot sites in Kent and Gloucestershire, this report aims to help commissioners of public services understand how they can improve outcomes for people and communities through closer integration of arts and cultural into public services. As part of the Cultural Commissioning Programme (CCP), New Economics Foundation worked with NHS and local authority partners in Kent and Gloucestershire over an 18 month period. This report brings together examples, case studies, templates and resources that share the successes of, and challenges faced by, the commissioners in the two pilot site. As part of the project the NHS Gloucestershire Clinical Commissioning Group has funded nine projects that are applying arts and culture across a range of clinical pathways including cancer, mental health and diabetes. They are also exploring how arts and cultural activities can be aligned with the county wide social prescribing scheme. Services developed in Kent include community-based mental health service which includes formal arts and cultural organisations, such as local museums and theatres, as well as smaller, informal arts and cultural groups, such as reading groups and dance classes. Kent County Council has also been involving arts and cultural organisations in their early help and preventative service worth around £8 million. Recommendations for other commissioners include: raising awareness within public services bodies of the benefits of working with arts and cultural providers; building provider capacity and knowledge; involving the arts and cultural sector in market engagement; improving procurement processes; and improving monitoring and evaluation processes.

Evidence to inform the commissioning of social prescribing

UNIVERSITY OF YORK. Centre for Reviews and Dissemination
2015

Summarises the findings of a rapid appraisal of available evidence on the effectiveness of social prescribing. Social prescribing is a way of linking patients in primary care with sources of support within the community, and can be used to improve health and wellbeing. For the review searches were conducted on the databases: DARE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and NHS EED for relevant systematic reviews and economic evaluations. Additional searches were also carried out on MEDLINE, ASSIA, Social Policy and Practice, NICE, SCIE and NHS. Very little good quality evidence was identified. Most available evidence described evaluations of pilot projects but failed to provide sufficient detail to judge either success or value for money. The briefing calls for better evaluation of new schemes. It recommends that evaluation should be of a comparative design; examine for whom and how well a scheme works; the effect it has and its costs.

Arts for health and wellbeing: an evaluation framework

DAYKIN Norma, JOSS Tim
2016

Guidance on appropriate ways of documenting the impacts of arts for health and wellbeing, whether through small scale project evaluations or large scale research studies. The document suggests a standard framework for reporting of project activities that will strengthen understanding of what works in specific contexts and enable realistic assessment and appropriate comparisons to be made between programmes. Part one provides background discussion to help make sense of the framework and includes a discussion of evaluation principles and practice, encompassing project planning, the role of advocacy and the importance of consultation and stakeholder involvement. In part two the different types of evaluation are outlined, with suggested tools for arts for health and wellbeing evaluation, including outcomes measurement. Part three captures the key components of project delivery, including the nature of the intervention, the populations engaged, the settings where the project takes place, the resources needed to support it, procedures for quality assurance, and the outcomes that the project is designed to achieve. Evaluation details are also sets out to encourage clear identification of important aspects such as rationale, evaluation questions, evaluation design, sampling, data collection and analysis, process evaluation, ethics and consent, reporting and dissemination, evaluation management and the resources needed to undertake evaluation.

Peer support for people with dementia: a social return on investment (SROI) study

SEMPLE Amy, WILLIS Elizabeth, de WAAL Hugo
2015

Reports on a study using Social Return on Investment (SROI) analysis to examine the impact and social value of peer support groups as an intervention for people with dementia. Three peer support groups in South London participated in the study. A separate SROI analysis was carried out for each individual group to find out what people valued about the groups and how they helped them. The report presents the outcomes for each group, the indicators for evidencing these outcomes and the quality and duration of outcomes experienced. It then provides detail on the methodology used to calculate the impact and the social return on investment. Overall, the study found that peer support groups provide positive outcomes for people with dementia, their carers and the volunteers who support the groups. The benefits of participating in peer support groups included: reduced isolation and loneliness; increased stimulation, including mental stimulation; and increased wellbeing. Carers experienced a reduction in carer stress, carer burden and reduction in the feeling of loneliness. Volunteers had an increased sense of wellbeing through their engagement with the group, improved knowledge of dementia and gained transferrable skills. Overall the study found that for every pound (£) of investment the social value created by the three groups evaluated ranged from £1.17 to £5.18.

Collaborative research between Aston Research Centre for Healthy Ageing (ARCHA) and the ExtraCare Charitable Trust: the final report

HOLLAND Carol, et al
2015

Report presenting findings from a longitudinal study to evaluate whether the ExtraCare Charitable Trust housing approach provides positive outcomes for healthy ageing which also results in health and social care cost savings. For the study 162 volunteer new residents were assessed prior to moving into ExtraCare accommodation in the 14 locations on their health, illness, well-being and level of activity. They were then assessed on the same measures at 6, 12 and 18 months after entry. Residents were compared against 39 control participants. The main focuse was to measure health, illness, well-being, activity and personal perceptions .Qualitative data were also collected through focus groups, interviews, and case studies to gather residents views and perceptions. Statistical modelling was used to identify the most important factors in predicting outcome measures of cost. Key findings identified: significant saving for NHS budgets, with total NHS costs reducing by 38% over a 12-month period for residents in the sample; a reduction in the duration of unplanned hospital stays; potential savings in the cost of social care; improvements in residents who were designated as in a 'pre-frail' state on entry to ExtraCare housing; and improvements in residents psychological wellbeing, memory and social interaction.

Results 1 - 10 of 26

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