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Results for 'performance evaluation'

Results 11 - 20 of 23

The social and economic impact of the Rotherham Social Prescribing Pilot: main evaluation report

DAYSON Chris, BASHIR Nadia
2014

Provides a detailed assessment of the social and economic impact of the Rotherham Social Prescribing Pilot from the perspective of key stakeholders. Social prescribing provides a way of linking patients in primary care and their carers with nonmedical sources of support within the community. Over the course of the pilot: 24 voluntary and community organisations (VCOs) received grants with a total value of just over £600,000 to deliver a menu of 31 separate social prescribing services; 1,607 patients were referred to the service, of whom 1,118 were referred on to funded VCS services; the five most common types of funded services referred to were information and advice, community activity, physical activities, befriending and enabling. The evaluation looked at the impact on the demand for hospital care and the economic and social benefits. The findings demonstrate that economic and social outcomes have been created for three main stakeholder groups: patients with LTCs and their carers, who have experienced improved mental health and greater engagement with the community; the local public sector, in particular health bodies, which have benefited from the reduced use of hospital resources; and the local voluntary and community sector, which has benefited from a catalytic investment in community level service provision.

Arts for health and wellbeing: an evaluation framework

DAYKIN Norma, JOSS Tim
2016

Guidance on appropriate ways of documenting the impacts of arts for health and wellbeing, whether through small scale project evaluations or large scale research studies. The document suggests a standard framework for reporting of project activities that will strengthen understanding of what works in specific contexts and enable realistic assessment and appropriate comparisons to be made between programmes. Part one provides background discussion to help make sense of the framework and includes a discussion of evaluation principles and practice, encompassing project planning, the role of advocacy and the importance of consultation and stakeholder involvement. In part two the different types of evaluation are outlined, with suggested tools for arts for health and wellbeing evaluation, including outcomes measurement. Part three captures the key components of project delivery, including the nature of the intervention, the populations engaged, the settings where the project takes place, the resources needed to support it, procedures for quality assurance, and the outcomes that the project is designed to achieve. Evaluation details are also sets out to encourage clear identification of important aspects such as rationale, evaluation questions, evaluation design, sampling, data collection and analysis, process evaluation, ethics and consent, reporting and dissemination, evaluation management and the resources needed to undertake evaluation.

Shared-life communities for people with a learning disability: a review of evidence

CUMELLA Stuart
2015

A review of the evidence from research about shared-life communities for people with a learning disability, summarising the results from the small number of academic studies which have attempted to measure the quality of life of people with a learning disability living in such communities. This study shows how shared-life communities facilitate a high quality of life for their residents with a learning disability and in particular: high levels of meaningful employment - residents are able to work full time in a range of unskilled and skilled work essential to the daily life and economy of the community, while also exercising choice over where they are able to work; opportunities for friendship - a shared-life communities provide a large clustering of potential friends with the opportunity to meet in workplace and informal settings, while ease of communication enables friendships to be sustained; and long-term relationships - living in extended families in a long-term social relationship with co-workers/assistants enables both groups to become familiar with each other’s pattern of communication.

Delivering a healthier future: how CCGs are leading the way on prevention and early diagnosis

NHS CLINICAL COMMISSIONERS
2016

Focusing on prevention and early diagnosis, the case studies in this publication demonstrate the impact clinical commissioning groups are making in a wide range of areas including mental health care, early diagnosis of cancer and stroke prevention. They show how CCGs are taking the lead in preventing illness and the causes of ill health – and working to keep people out of hospital where possible; how they are helping to ensure that people are diagnosed earlier and given the support that they need; and they are working across boundaries to build on what people want and need to help them lead longer, healthier lives. More specifically the case studies provide examples of: working proactively with older people living with frailty; addressing preventable early deaths; supporting people to prevent and manage diabetes; reducing hospital admissions in people with COPD; managing c. difficile infections in the community; improving access to health services for homeless people; taking a strategic approach to stroke prevention; addressing early diagnosis of cancer; earlier diagnosis and prevention of HIV; improving early diagnosis and treatment of people with atrial fibrillation; working with the voluntary sector; impact of Living Well; and social prescribing to improve outcomes.

People helping people: year two of the pioneer programme

NHS ENGLAND
2016

Describes the journey taken over the last year by the integrated care pioneers. The 25 pioneer sites are developing and testing new and different ways of joining up health and social care services across England, utilising the expertise of the voluntary and community sector, with the aim of improving care, quality and effectiveness of services being provided. The report describes the progress, challenges and lessons learnt across the pioneers. A number of key themes have emerged, including: population segmentation to determine people’s characteristics, their needs and care demands; using the experience of people; providing proactive care; providing integrated care services; supporting integration through using shared care records; using technology to support different access points; analysing impacts through data; and removing financial disincentives. Also included within the report are pioneers’ stories which describe the core elements of their care models and showcase how these are impacting real people.

Assisted living technology and services: a learning development framework

SKILLS FOR CARE
2013

A learning and development framework to support those involved in the commissioning, design or delivery of workforce development. The framework aims to help ensure that the social care workforce has the skills and knowledge to use assisted living technology to enhance the lives of vulnerable people and their carers. Five stages provide the structure for the framework: Readiness; Customer Flow Analysis (guidance to assist the identification of work or service flow in your or your partner's organisation); Workforce Analysis (which provides guidance on how to map tasks and roles to knowledge and skills needed); Learning Design and Delivery (providing tools and resources for learning) and Checking (helping to evaluate the impact of learning). The framework also provides definitions, terminology and language that can be used by all when preparing workforce development products in the assistive living technology field.

Measuring your impact on loneliness in later life

CAMPAIGN TO END LONELINESS
2015

This guidance offers information and advice on choosing and using a scale to measure the impact of services and interventions on loneliness in older age. A scale is simply a way of numerically measuring an opinion or emotion, and is one way to gather evidence about the effectiveness of a service. Using a scale enables service providers to ask about loneliness in a structured way – and produces numbers that can help illustrate how much of a difference they are making. In this guidance four different scales are described and evaluated and their strengths and limitations discussed. These are: the Campaign to End Loneliness Measurement Tool; the De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale; the UCLA Loneliness Scale; and the single-item ‘scale’. The paper explains how to use a chosen scale, focusing on sampling for a survey, gaining informed consent, reducing bias, data collection, asking open, follow-up questions, and keeping personal information confidential.

Avoiding unhappy returns: radical reductions in readmissions, achieved with volunteers

ROYAL VOLUNTARY SERVICE
2014

A summary of the achievements of the Royal Voluntary Service Hospital 2 Home service during its first year. Leicestershire County Council launched the scheme in hospitals in six districts, including the three university hospitals in Leicester in summer 2012. The service provides practical help and support following a discharge from hospital; helps users to regain confidence and reduce anxiety; reduces social isolation; promotes independent living and choice; helps users to maintain day to day activities; provides information/signpost to other organisations; and helps prevent readmissions to hospital. Designed to be short-term, friendly and confidential and people-centred, the service is provided free of charge and is normally available for up to six weeks. Over 600 people have been referred. Among the participants readmission rates to hospital have been very low, with readmissions of older people approximately half national rates.

Preventing Crisis for Carers: a Princess Royal Trust for Carers' programme funded by the Moffat Charitable Trust: final evaluation report

KELLY Timothy B., et al
2010

An independent evaluation of the Crisis Prevention Programme, which comprised four individual pilot projects operating in four NHS board areas in Scotland and aimed to get support and advice for carers at an early stage, offer them a carer's assessment, reduce the pressure on their health, get them involved in discharge planning and train health and social care professionals in carer awareness. The evaluation found that the programme resulted in many improvements in hospitals, including: professionals were more likely to identify carers at an early stage and put support for them in place at an earlier stage; there were changes to ways of working which benefited carers; carers reported feeling that professionals had more recognition of their expertise in caring and understood their needs as a carer; carers felt more able to have a say in shaping the services they, or the person they cared for, received; and carers were provided with more information, such as being told of their right to a carer's assessment. The evaluation recommended that funding for carer support workers in hospitals continues and that carer awareness training should be mandatory for all healthcare professionals.

Impact assessment toolkit: commissioning assistive technologies

SKILLS FOR CARE
2014

This online tool outlines the key steps of planning and implementing the impact assessment of assisted living technologies (ALT) and assistive living services (ALT). It includes practical tips, links to other sources of guidance and areas to discuss with partners. The toolkit covers designing an evaluation framework; assigning impact measures; establishing a sample of people to assess impact; establishing unit costs; developing data capture research tools; measuring return on investment; quality control; and using the findings to inform future delivery. The tool should be used in conjunction with two accompanying reports: 'Supporting commissioners of assisted living Services: stage 1: research report' and 'Commissioning assisted living technologies: guidance'.

Results 11 - 20 of 23

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