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Results for 'policy'

Results 1 - 4 of 4

Implementing the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health

NHS ENGLAND
2016

Implementation plan which outlines a roadmap for delivering the commitments made in the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health to people who use services and the public in order to improve care. It prioritises objectives for delivery by 2020/21 and is intended as a blueprint for the changes that NHS staff, other organisations and other parts of the system can make. Key principles of the plan include co-production, working in partnership with local public, private and voluntary sector organisations; early interventions and delivering person-centred care. The plan also gives a clear indication to the public and people who use services what they can expect from the NHS, and when. It also outlines future funding commitments, shows how the workforce requirements will be delivered in these priority areas, and how data and payment will support transparency. Separate sections cover: children and young people’s mental health; perinatal mental health; adult mental health – including community, acute, crisis care and secure care; mental health and justice, and suicide prevention. These individual chapters set out national-level objectives, costs and planning assumptions. Chapters also describe cross-cutting work to help sustain transformation, including testing new models of care and ensuring the health and wellbeing of the NHS workforce.

Framework for patient and public participation in primary care commissioning

NHS ENGLAND
2016

A guide for primary care commissioners in NHS England and Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) on how to involve patients, service users, carers and the public in the commissioning of primary care services. This includes involving throughout the commissioning process in the planning, policy making, buying and monitoring primary care services such as general practice, community pharmacy, dental, and eye health services. The Framework looks at how NHS England involves people in commissioning at national and local levels; co-commissoning with CCGs; and individual responsibilities as a policy or commissioning manager in primary care. It also includes short case study examples, provides details of additional sources of information, and key partner organisations and networks with an interest in public participation. It has been co-designed with members of the Working Group for Patient and Public Participation in Primary Care Commissioning and also incorporates feedback received from key stakeholders. The document will also be of interest to patients and the public, the voluntary sector, and providers of health and social care services. It is designed to be read with the NHS England Patient and Public Participation Policy and the Statement of Arrangements and Guidance on Patient and Public Participation in Commissioning.

The NHS in 2030: a vision of a people-powered, knowledge-powered health system

BLAND Jessica
2015

This report explores four big ways that knowledge power and people power will affect the NHS in 2030 and the wider health system, through precision medicine, new forms of health data, people–powered health, and the use of behavioural insights. Section 1, in particular, concentrates on where new kinds of medical information about individuals will come from, as well as how it is interpreted in stratified care. Section 2 moves onto people managing their own health information and new digital platforms for supporting patient–led research and care. Section 3 looks at the possibility of a social movement for health: people being trusted to have a more active role in their own health and to look after others, supported by the NHS, as well as people supporting health services. Section 4 explores how insights into human behaviours can help redesign health services, products and treatments in a way that reflects better how people live their lives and make choices. This is followed by a summary of how these developments will change the function of the NHS. The final sections focus on the challenges involved in getting to the best version of this future and ideas for how these changes can be supported today. Concentrating on the widest gaps between these ideas and current policy, the conclusion includes four proposals that would support new functions in the health system. These are: developing digital platforms and widely agreed protocols for developing new kinds of health knowledge; creating prototypes for health data sharing that concentrate on understanding emerging attitudes to digital privacy; establishing an institution that supports and evaluates people powered health research; and creating a central institution to set standards and mandate processes that will maximise the clinical and research value of large genomic and other data sets as they become available.

Loneliness and isolation: evidence review

AGE UK
2012

Loneliness and isolation are not the same. The causes of loneliness are not just physical isolation and lack of companionship, but also sometimes the lack of a useful role in society. Estimates of prevalence of loneliness tend to concentrate on the older population and they vary widely, with reputable research coming up with figures of 6%-13% of the UK population being described as often or always lonely. This evidence review has been produced in order to provide evidence to underpin decision-making for people involved in commissioning, service development, fundraising and influencing. It discusses: the policy context; what is known about loneliness and isolation in older people; and what has been done (including one-to-one services, group services, and community involvement) and how effective they were. The key messages from the evidence are listed.

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