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Results for 'prevention'

Results 31 - 40 of 77

Supporting the independence of older people: are councils doing enough?

THOMAS Huw Vaughan
2015

This report examines how effective councils in Wales have been in providing strategic leadership on older person’s issues. It analyses the Welsh Government’s and councils’ budgets, looking at the range and availability of preventative services across Wales, focusing on four core aspects that support older people to continue to live independently: practical support services; community based facilities; advice and information services; and housing and housing based services. The report also assesses councils’ performance management arrangements for overseeing services to older people, examining the information that is used by councils to judge performance. The review argues that Councils’ strategies and leadership focus too much on delivery of social services and do not always recognise the important contribution that other services can make in supporting and sustaining the independence of older people. Despite some innovative examples of councils supporting older people, the wider preventative services that can help reduce demand for health and social services are undervalued. A lack of data is making it difficult for councils to demonstrate the impact of their services in supporting the independence of older people, and this weakens their decision making and scrutiny when setting future priorities.

Prevention: a shared commitment: making the case for a Prevention Transformation Fund

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

This document identifies and collates key pieces of evidence about the cost effectiveness of prevention in order to make the case for greater investment in prevention interventions. The report recommends that the Government should introduce a Prevention Transformation Fund, worth at least £2 billion annually. This would enable some double running of new investment in preventative services alongside ‘business as usual’ in the current system, until savings can be realised and reinvested into the system – as part of wider local prevention strategies. Based on the analysis of an extensive range of intervention case studies that have provided a net cost benefit, the report suggests that investment in prevention could yield a net return of 90 per cent.

Bibliography and map of community-centred interventions for health and wellbeing

BAGNALL A.M., et al
2015

This bibliography and map present the results of a scoping review undertaken as part of a national knowledge translation project ‘Working with Communities – Empowerment, Evidence and Learning’ (2014-2015), jointly funded and steered by NHS England and Public Health England (PHE). This project aimed to support better, more effective working with communities on health and wellbeing through improving access to existing evidence and learning. The first part of this report presents the bibliography, with a total of 168 publications organised into types of study/resource, whether they relate specifically to UK practice or are non-UK studies covering international research. The second part of the report describes the scoping review methods and results of the mapping, in terms of the spread of evidence resources and characteristics. In terms of the types of outcomes that were reported in the included studies, process outcomes (i.e. how an intervention was implemented) were the most frequently reported, followed by service delivery and organisational outcomes, wellbeing outcomes and health outcomes. Economic outcomes were reported in 43 studies, and outcomes relating to the social determinants of health were reported in only 41 studies. Wellbeing outcomes were slightly more likely to be reported at a community level than were health outcomes.

From evidence into action: opportunities to protect and improve the nation's health

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2014

Strategic document setting out Public Health England's priorities for the next five years. The report provides a brief overview of the state of health in England today, the key health drivers, prevention plans, and future trends. It identifies and examines seven priorities for PHE working with local and central government, clinical commissioning groups and the wider NHS, universities, industry, employers, and the voluntary and community sector. These are: tackling obesity; reducing smoking; reducing harmful drinking; ensuring every child has the best start in life; reducing dementia risk; tackling antimicrobial resistance; and reducing tuberculosis.

Response to the regulations and guidance of the Care Act 2014: section 2: prevention, reducing or delaying needs

CARE AND SUPPORT ALLIANCE
2015

Sets out the response of the Care and Support Alliance to the Government consultation on draft regulations and guidance of the Care Act 2014. The response focuses on section 2 which covers prevention, reducing or delaying needs. Overall, the Alliance is pleased with the draft of both the regulations and guidance, but notes areas that could be strengthened and identifies scope to improve the read across to other chapters. Areas covered in the response include the description of prevention used and the examples of preventative services and resources listed in the guidance.

Evaluation of Redcar and Cleveland Community Agents Project: outputs and outcomes summary report

WATSON Pat, SHUCKSMITH Janet
2015

The Community Agents Project, a programme jointly funded through health and adult social care services, is an innovative approach to meeting the social needs of the elderly and vulnerable population. Community agents act as a one-stop shop, signposting people to the appropriate service that meets their needs. This could be an organisation or voluntary group that can help with shopping, arrange transport to the GP surgery or hospital appointments, help to complete forms, offer encouragement to maintain a care plan, organise a befriender, accompany to a local social activity or signposting to other agencies. The project has received a total of 486 referrals across the borough of Redcar & Cleveland for the period September 2014-September 2015, generating positive outcomes in the following areas: maintaining independence; faster discharge from hospital; reducing admissions to hospital; reducing isolation; improved financial status; appropriate use of health and social services; cost saving; and increases in community capacity. The report estimates a social return on investment of £3.29 for every £1 invested in the Community Agents Project.

Beyond fighting fires: the role of the fire and rescue service in improving the public's health

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

The case studies contained within this publication explore the activities of fire and rescue service to help the most vulnerable individuals and families in their communities. The trust placed in these services and the comprehensive access to the public that this provides means they have a unique ability to provide critical interventions, promote health messages and refer to appropriate services. These case studies include programmes spread across England, covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. They show a range of ways in which the fire and rescue service supports prevention and contributes to tackling health inequalities by: supporting people with dementia; using firefighters to be ‘health champions’; tackling child obesity; reaching out to the most vulnerable; looking out for babies and toddlers; getting people active; working with others to save lives; and reducing falls in the home.

Is integration or fragmentation the starting point to improve prevention?

MILLER Robin
2014

The importance of health, social care and other sectors working together has been recognised for many decades by governments of all political persuasion. This is true within the current policy environment, in which integration has been proposed as the binding force to connect an increasingly diverse range of providers around individual patients and their families. Initiatives to promote integration are being introduced at all levels of the system, with a patient experience based narrative setting the standard against which success should be judged. This integration is being encouraged not only in respect of statutorily funded clinical, public health and social care services but also with other policy areas such as housing and leisure and other sectors (in particular the third sector). Despite this continued belief in policy that integration will lead to a more preventative focus, there is not a strong research base to support this view. However, accepting the limitations of the evidence base, this Policy Paper looks at five key lessons which can still be drawn for national policy makers with responsibility for promoting integration and prevention. These are to: start with what is fragmented; be clear what is meant (by integration); know what success looks like; understand the impact; and be wary of further change. The paper draws attention to key findings from reviews of integrated care; and notes that the interventions that have been most effective have been those with more preventative approaches. It concludes that patients and service users have to integrate support from statutory services, community resources and their personal networks to improve their quality of life and maintain their health and independence. To understand how and when to integrate, we first need to be clear what links are required and how they could operate in practice. That is why fragmentation rather than integration should be the starting point to achieve a prevention orientated health and social care system. This policy paper is based on a discussion paper which was commissioned by the Institute for Social Change at Manchester University as part of a series of Knowledge Exchange Trials workshops which brought together academics, policy makers and programme stakeholders to facilitate exchange of ideas, expertise and research.

Housing, prevention and early intervention at work: a summary of the evidence base

PORTEUS Jeremy
2011

This summary briefing explores the latest research and findings on the preventive aspects of both capital and revenue housing interventions in local care economies and the wider benefit realisation. In particular, it captures research that evidences the cost benefit of support for older and vulnerable adults with a long term condition in extra care housing as an alternative to residential care, preventing unnecessary hospital admissions and speeding up patient discharges. This evidence shows the care efficiencies that can be achieved and the potential for savings on the public purse. The paper concludes that that for prevention and early intervention to be effective a multi-dimensional approach is required, rewarding closer integration, offering incentives to encourage innovation and market development, and supporting investment in physical and social capital.

Joint review of investment in voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations in health and care sector

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health, et al
2015

This report summarises the initial findings of a review developed in co-production with the statutory and voluntary sectors, exploring how the sector could: maximise and demonstrate its impact; build sustainability and capacity; promote equality and address health inequalities. From January to March 2015 around 4,500 people and organisations were consulted, sharing their views on the current state of the statutory and VCSE sectors, the key challenges they face, including reduced funding, and the potential of the sector, particularly in relation to equality and health inequalities, prevention and resilience, and personalisation and co-production.

Results 31 - 40 of 77

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