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Results for 'prevention'

Results 41 - 50 of 77

Making the case for public health interventions: public health spending and return on investment

KING'S FUND, LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2014

These infographics from the King's Fund and the Local Government Association set out key facts about the public health system and the return on investment for some public health interventions. They show the changing demographics with a growing ageing population and the impact of social and behavioural determinants on people’s health. The document also highlights the costs of key health and social services and estimates the potential returns on investment on preventative interventions. For instance, Birmingham’s Be Active programme of free use of leisure centres and other initiatives returned an estimated £23 in quality of life, reduced NHS use and other gains for every £1 spent. Every £1 spent on improving homes saves the NHS £70 over 10 years. Befriending services have been estimated to pay back around £3.75 in reduced mental health service spending and improvements in health for every £1 spent. Every £1 spent on drugs treatment saves society £2.50 in reduced NHS and social care costs and reduced crime.

A call to action: commissioning for prevention

NHS ENGLAND
2013

This document sets out a framework intended to help clinical commissioning groups think about how to commission for effective prevention. Commissioning for prevention is one potentially transformative change that CCGs can make, together with Health and Wellbeing Boards and their other local partners. The paper argues that whether on grounds of health need, cost or public expectations the case for developing a wellness rather than solely an illness service is compelling. This can be achieved by effectively commissioning for prevention through the following steps: analysing the most important health problems at population level; working together with partners and the community, setting common goals or priorities; identifying high-impact prevention programmes focused on the top causes of premature mortality and chronic disability; planning the resource profile needed to deliver prevention goals; and measuring impact and experimenting rapidly.

ADASS budget survey 2015: report

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2015

An analysis of the state of adult social care finances, providing in-depth intelligence on how adult social care is responding to the twin challenges of meeting increased demand and managing reducing resources. The survey seeks to explore the views of Directors of Adult Social Services across English Local Authorities on how councils are reconciling the growing numbers of people, often with increasingly complex needs, requiring care and support with the significant and sustained reductions in the funding available. The survey data sets out the concerns of councils in making increasingly difficult choices and the attempts to minimise impacts upon front line services. The report suggests that taking the growth in numbers of older and disabled people into account an additional £1.1 billion would be needed to provide the same level of service as last year. The care provision market is becoming increasingly fragile and 56 per cent of directors report that providers are facing financial difficulties. Many local authorities are going to have to pay more if providers are to be able to attract workers as unemployment falls. While directors see increased prevention and integration as their top two areas for savings for this year, next and beyond, many are struggling to balance investment in reducing future demand and costs at a time when budgets to meet existing statutory duties to provide care and support to those most in need are under such pressure. The paper calls upon the Government to urgently ensure that social care funding is protected and aligned with the NHS, including making provision for the social care funding gap alongside the funding gap for the NHS.

Emerging practice in outcome-based commissioning for social care: discussion paper

BOLTON John
2015

This paper is a progress report exploring the lessons learnt from a variety of approaches taken by councils to outcome-based commissioning in adult social care (sometimes called 'payment by results'). It considers some of the opportunities and risks that arise from taking this approach. The paper puts the emerging practice in social care in a context with other developments within the public sector; explores current practices in social care from a small number of councils and looks at the advantages and risks in taking this approach. It suggests that this approach could deliver better outcomes for people at a lower cost if the transaction costs can be limited. The paper draws on discussions with providers, commissioners and customers receiving services. The development of thinking in local authorities in recent times has shown a new emphasis on interventions that either prevent or reduce someone’s need for longer term care. This is supported by the evidence for the benefits from reablement for older people, the recovery model in mental health and the emerging progression model in learning disability services. Outcomes based commissioning is, in part, a natural evolution of the way in which commissioning might take place when a council is seeking improved outcomes for its customers as a result of the resources it purchases or deploys. The report argues that the overall expectation is that if a provider can produce outcomes for customers that may reduce their need for longer term care they should be rewarded. At the same time if fewer people need longer term care this will reduce the overall costs to the council. The benefits can then be shared between commissioners and providers of services.

Building community-based support with older people: evidence from other research reports

OUTSIDE THE BOX
2015

This report, developed as a resource for community groups, draws on recent key reports, discussion papers and research studies to present evidence on creating and sustaining community-based support for older people, including those which older people lead. It provides definitions of terms and approaches used in community-based support; outlines the current the policy context in Scotland; and then provides an overview of the main findings on community capacity building, changes in public services and the impacts for older people. Points raised in the evidence include: older people who need extra support generally know what will make life better for them; community-based activities that focus on older people's wellbeing complement other services; and that providing community-based solutions and low-level support to older people before they need greater support can prevent or reduce the need for higher intensity services, bring benefits and better outcomes to the people involved. The final section summarises findings from the individual reports and research reviews identified. Although the policy and practice context for the report focuses on the situation in Scotland, most of the reports featured in the review come from the experience of services based in England.

Living Well for Longer: one year on

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
2015

Sets out progress to reduce premature avoidable mortality as set out in 'Living Well for Longer: National support for local action to reduce premature avoidable mortality.' The report argues that there has been improved prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of the five big killers: cancer, stroke, heart disease, lung disease, and liver disease. It also outlines the next steps for ongoing improvements across the system in reducing premature mortality, focusing on shared system leadership, accountability and transparency, ensuring prevention is front and centre, and improving outcomes for patients.

Occupational therapy and physical activity interventions to promote the mental health wellbeing of older people in primary care and residential care: evidence update March 2015

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
2015

Summarises selected new evidence published since the original literature search was conducted for the NICE guidance 16 Occupational therapy and physical activity interventions to promote the mental health wellbeing of older people in primary care and residential care (2008). A search was conducted for new evidence from 1 June 2011 to 28 July 2014 and a total of 8,973 pieces of evidence were initially identified. The 21 most relevant references underwent a critical appraisal process and then were reviewed by an Evidence Update Advisory Group, which advised on the final list of 6 items selected for the Evidence Update. The update provides detailed commentaries on the new evidence focussing on the following themes: occupational interventions, physical activity, walking schemes, and training. It also highlights evidence uncertainties identified.

The prevention revolution: transforming health and social care

ACEVO. Taskforce on Prevention in Health
2013

This report sets out a number of recommendations aimed at shifting focus and investment towards the provision of integrated, preventative care and support. It looks at three key areas: changing the culture and practices at the local level; changing national-level frameworks and incentives; and the role of long-term investment in driving transformation. The report calls for a ‘prevention revolution’, in which preventative support, advice and treatment is fully integrated into all stages of the care pathway, with the aim of addressing the wider determinants of ill-health, supporting people to manage long-term conditions more effectively, and providing treatment and support in community settings wherever possible, reducing the need for treatment in acute settings. Throughout the report, there is an emphasis on the role played by voluntary organisations in: providing preventative, holistic care in community settings; fostering innovation; strengthening patient engagement; and catalysing cultural change.

Hidden citizens: how can we identify the most lonely older adults?

GOODMAN Anna, SWIFT Hannah J., ADAMS Adrian
2015

This report summarises the findings from the Hidden Citizens project, providing insights regarding the pathways into and out of loneliness and examples of how interventions and services identify the loneliest older adults. The project was conducted in two parts. First, a meta-review was conducted to explore the features of loneliness, its underlying mechanisms and how intervention programs identify and recruit their participants. The findings of the meta-review informed the second part of the project in which a number of interviews and focus groups with older people, service commissioners, service organisation CEO’s, managers and practitioners were conducted. This report also contains specific recommendations for policy makers, service providers and service commissioners on how to improve services and service provision, and identifies avenues for future research to explore. It shows that the experience of loneliness is likely to be a culmination of one or more factors, or set of circumstances, which include: membership of different social groups; personality; psychological response; environmental factors; life events, traumas and transitions; and personal circumstances. The report sets out recommendations considering ways to identify people experiencing loneliness across three different levels: the population, organisational and individual level.

Inside out and upside down: community based approaches to social care prevention in a time of austerity

MILLER Robin, WHITEHEAD Christine
2015

Reflects the experiences of six local authorities in the West Midlands who were identified by the regional ADASS group as seeking to deploy community based approaches within their prevention strategies. These approaches focus on opening up and sharing resources, insights and influence as a means to support individuals and local communities develop their capacity and resilience, shifting from a crisis solution model to a more preventative based social care system. The report begins with a short overview of the six community based approaches based on interviews with the leads in each local authority, and then pulls out key themes relating to the development of such approaches and lessons learnt. These are: community based approaches to prevention can take different forms; it is important to build on the local context; transformation of practice can be achieved in multiple ways; gathering relevant data is difficult but worthwhile; and genuine engagement and co-production with community and staff are central.

Results 41 - 50 of 77

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