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Results for 'quality of life'

Results 11 - 20 of 20

Shared-life communities for people with a learning disability: a review of evidence

CUMELLA Stuart
2015

A review of the evidence from research about shared-life communities for people with a learning disability, summarising the results from the small number of academic studies which have attempted to measure the quality of life of people with a learning disability living in such communities. This study shows how shared-life communities facilitate a high quality of life for their residents with a learning disability and in particular: high levels of meaningful employment - residents are able to work full time in a range of unskilled and skilled work essential to the daily life and economy of the community, while also exercising choice over where they are able to work; opportunities for friendship - a shared-life communities provide a large clustering of potential friends with the opportunity to meet in workplace and informal settings, while ease of communication enables friendships to be sustained; and long-term relationships - living in extended families in a long-term social relationship with co-workers/assistants enables both groups to become familiar with each other’s pattern of communication.

What role for extra care housing in a socially isolated landscape?

KNEALE Dylan
2013

This report for the Housing Learning and Improvement Network explores the likely impact of housing with care in helping to limit social isolation and loneliness from being an integral part of the ageing experience. The report questions the ways in which living in extra care housing could reduce or lower the risk of social isolation, and how this could in turn translate to lower dependency on state services. The report also presents case studies that outline the mechanisms through which living in extra care housing reduces the risk of social isolation. It begins through reviewing current government standpoints on social isolation and loneliness.

The adult social care outcomes framework 2014/15: handbook of definitions

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
2014

This handbook sets out the indicators for measuring adult social care outcomes in 2014 and 2015 using the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF). The framework is designed to support councils to improve the quality of care and support services they provide and give a national overview of adult social care outcomes. The handbook provides technical detail of each measure, with examples to minimise confusion and inconsistency in reporting and interpretation. The indicators are structured around the four key domains set out in the framework, including: enhancing quality of life for people with care and support needs; delaying and reducing the need for care and support; ensuring people have a positive experience of care and support; and safeguarding people whose circumstances make them vulnerable and protecting from avoidable harm.

Wiltshire Council: help to live at home service: an outcome-based approach to social care: case study report

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
2012

The case study describes the process that Wiltshire Council has used to develop its new ‘Help to Live at Home Service’ for older people and others who require help to remain at home. The approach focused on the outcomes that the older people wish to gain from social care. It involved a complete overhaul of the social care system from the role of the social worker working alongside the customer to determine the required outcomes to the role of the providers of the service who must deliver these outcomes and receive payment based on that delivery. The report aims to promote discussion about how outcomes-based, personalised support can best work in social care in England in the future.

Building dementia-friendly communities: a priority for everyone

GREEN Geraldine, LAKEY Louise, ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
2013

The National Dementia Declaration for England (2010) identified that people with dementia want to live in communities that give them choice and control over their lives, provide services and support designed around their needs, and to feel valued and understood, and part of family, community and civic life. This report provides evidence of dementia-friendly communities in England, Wales and Northern Ireland from the perspective of people affected by dementia. It uses the results of a survey of people with dementia (510 respondents) distributed by Alzheimer’s Society staff and other networks in Autumn 2012 (referred to as the DFCsurvey) to explore the barriers that people face in their community, how they would like to be engaged in their local area, and the support they need to enable them to do so. Overall, the report aims to provide guidance to areas that are looking to become dementia-friendly, and to provide extra evidence for those already committed to becoming dementia-friendly. Evidence from people with dementia and their carers is collated alongside examples of projects that are making a difference for people with dementia. This information is used both to provide a definition of a dementia-friendly community, and to suggest 10 key areas of focus for communities to consider in working to become dementia friendly. These 10 key areas are: challenge stigma and build understanding; accessible community activities; acknowledge potential; ensure an early diagnosis; practical support to enable engagement in community life; community-based solutions; consistent and reliable travel options; easy to navigate environments; and respectful and responsive businesses and services. While there are some excellent examples of communities that are adapting themselves to the needs required by dementia, many people with dementia do not feel supported and a part of their local area; and are not able to take part in activities that they enjoyed before they developed the condition. Loneliness, feeling isolated and lack of confidence were identified as major barriers.

Prevention services, social care and older people: much discussed but little researched?

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH. School for Social Care Research
2013

A scoping study investigated approaches to prevention services in local authorities which enable older people to retain their independence for as long as possible to maintain their quality of life and reduce pressure on local authority and NHS budgets. The study involved a survey of Directors of Adult Social Services in 9 local authorities to identify what they viewed as their top 3 investments in prevention services for older people, and interviews with lead managers for each intervention. It also reviewed local and national evidence as to whether these interventions lead to a delay or reduction in uptake of social care services This paper summarises the key findings from the research. It explains that the top 3 interventions were reablement (a top 3 approach for all of the local authorities surveyed), technology-based interventions (among the top 3 interventions in 6 authorities), and information and advice (among the top 3 in 3 authorities), while a number of other prevention interventions were identified by one local authority each. It reports on how local authorities seek evidence and guidance on prevention services and factors influencing how local funding was spent, and on assessment of the outcomes and impact of prevention interventions. It also summarises national and local evidence for the top 3 interventions.

Well-being and dementia - how can it be achieved?

WOODS Bob
2012

In this article, the author reviews findings in dementia care on interventions and on quality of life with the aim of identifying factors associated with quality of life which can form the basis for interventions enhancing quality of life for people with dementia. The article looks at evaluation of well-being and quality of life in people with dementia, including the importance of "hearing the voice of people with dementia", and the key factors predicting quality of life in people with dementia. Drawing on this, it suggests potential strategies and interventions for improving quality of life in people with dementia: improve mood, maintain health, hopeful staff attitudes, reduce use of anti-psychotic medication, enhance relationship with carer, encourage family involvement, cognitive stimulation and cognitive rehabilitation, and creative activities and approaches.

The effect of telecare on the quality of life and psychological well-being of elderly recipients of social care over a 12-month period: the Whole Systems Demonstrator cluster randomised trial

HIRANI Shashivadan Parbati, et al
2014

Background: Home-based telecare (TC) is utilised to manage risks of independent living and provide prompt emergency responses. This study examined the effect of TC on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety and depressive symptoms over 12 months in patients receiving social care. Design: A study of participant-reported outcomes [the Whole Systems Demonstrator (WSD) Telecare Questionnaire Study; baseline n = 1,189] was nested in a pragmatic cluster-randomised trial of TC (the WSD Telecare trial), held across three English Local Authorities. General practice (GP) was the unit of randomisation and TC was compared with usual care (UC). Methods: Participant-reported outcome measures were collected at baseline, short-term (4 months) and long-term (12 months) follow-up, assessing generic HRQoL, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Primary intention-to-treat analyses tested treatment effectiveness and were conducted using multilevel models to control for GP clustering and covariates for participants who completed questionnaire measures at baseline assessment plus at least one other assessment (n = 873). Results: Analyses found significant differences between TC and UC on Short Form-12 mental component scores (P < 0.05), with parameter estimates indicating being a member of the TC trial-arm increases mental component scores (UC-adjusted mean = 40.52; TC-adjusted mean = 43.69). Additional significant analyses revealed, time effects on EQ5D (decreasing over time) and depressive symptoms (increasing over time). Conclusions: TC potentially contributes to the amelioration in the decline in users’ mental HRQoL over a 12-month period. TC may not transform the lives of its users, but it may afford small relative benefits on some psychological and HRQOL outcomes relative to users who only receive UC.

Pervasive interactions: a purposive best evidence review with methodological observations on the impact of housing circumstances and housing interventions on adult mental health and well-being

JOHNSON Robin
2013

There is a widespread view, derived primarily from the lived experience of mental health service staff and service users, that housing has a significant impact on mental health. The aim of this purposive review is to describe the current state of evidence on the effect of housing circumstances, and housing-related interventions, on adult mental health and well-being. The review covers the entire range of health from chronic illness to positive thriving, and both individual and community-level/public health. It gives priority to research relevant to public policy considerations, in particular to the UK context.  The complexity of methodological issues emerges as a key challenge for research in this field, and for the prospect of evidence-based national policy. The limited available evidence gives conditional support to: policies accentuating empowerment at individual and community levels; early intervention; locality or place-based interventions; and integrated working practice.

Exploring the difference made by Support at home

JOY Sarah, CORRAL Susana, NZEGWU Femi
2013

An evaluation of the British Red Cross Support at Home services, which provide time-limited care and support to people at a time of crisis who are finding it difficult to cope at home. Overall the research highlighted that the common area of major impact of Support at Home is the enhancement of service users’ quality of life. The support provided is characterised by a strong sense of trust by service users in the Red Cross brand alongside a compassionate, caring, non-judgemental, time-flexible and person-enabling approach. In particular, the findings show that four service user outcomes were significantly improved or increased following receipt of support. These include: improved wellbeing; increased ability to manage daily activities; increase in leisure activities; and improved coping skills. Other positive changes were also reported related to the wider benefits of the service beyond the service user outcomes alone, including enabling safe discharge, supporting carers and enabling patient advocacy. The report identifies a series of action points to help further develop the services: champion Red Cross strengths, respond to the changing profile of service users, develop active partnerships to extend reach and maximise impact, clarify the Red Cross’ position for people in need who fall outside of commissioned contracts, collect consistent and routine local and national data to inform service learning and development, develop signposting to ensure long-term impact and grow skills in order to advocate on behalf of service users.

Results 11 - 20 of 20

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