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Results for 'social prescribing'

Results 21 - 30 of 30

At the heart of health: realising the value of people and communities

WOOD Suzanne, et al
2016

This report explores the value of people and communities at the heart of health, in support of the NHS Five Year Forward View vision to develop a new relationship with people and communities. It seeks to bring together in one place a wide range of person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing. It provides an overview of the existing evidence base with a particular focus on the potential benefits of adopting these approaches. The report suggests that there is evidence from research and practice to demonstrate the benefits of person- and community-centred approaches, across three dimensions of value: mental and physical health and wellbeing – these approaches have been shown to increase people’s self-efficacy and confidence to manage their health and care, improve health outcomes and experience, to reduce social isolation and loneliness, and build community capacity and resilience, among other outcomes; NHS sustainability – these approaches can impact how people use health and care services and can lead to reduced demand on services, particularly emergency admissions and A&E visits; and wider social outcomes: these approaches can lead to a wide range of social outcomes, from improving employment prospects and school attendance to increasing volunteering. They also can potentially contribute to reducing health inequalities for individuals and communities. The report includes an outline of the ‘Realising the Value’ programme, which is designed to develop the field of person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing by building the evidence base and developing tools, resources and networks to support the spread and increase the impact of key approaches.

More than medicine: new services for people powered health

LANGFORD Katharine, BAECK Peter, HAMPSON Martha
2013

Examines the constitutive elements of the ‘more than medicine’ approach, looking at social prescribing, signposting through link workers, health trainers and navigators, and community-based services. ‘More than medicine’ creates a set of tools for clinicians to use with patients to address the behavioural and social aspects of long term conditions. It connects the clinical consultation with interventions such as peer support groups, debt counselling, walking groups, befriending, one-to-one coaching and community cooking classes that help people to manage their long-term conditions and improve their health and wellbeing. These activities, places and people help service users and patients to live healthier lives, make friends and learn new skills. The report provides a description of each element of ‘more than medicine’ - social prescribing, signposting and community services - and illustrates the discussion with case studies and summaries of the evidence.

Community navigation in Brighton and Hove: evaluation of a social prescribing pilot

FARENDEN Clair, et al
2015

An evaluation of the community navigation service, a one-year social prescribing pilot. The model for the pilot was based on Age UK national templates, drawing from their vast knowledge and experience of delivering other similar services across the UK. Community navigators work in GP surgeries to assess patients non-medical support needs and help them access groups, services and activities that can broadly improve their health and wellbeing. The evaluation found that navigation is effective for patients, GP surgeries and volunteers. Patients feel listened to and understood by navigators, have increased access to the right services at the right time and are able to take the next steps towards improving their health and wellbeing. GPs continue to increase referrals, are satisfied with the quality of the service and are seeing positive benefits for their patients. Navigators value their volunteering role and suggest the training and support provided by the staff team enables them to carry it out effectively. 393 patients were referred across 16 surgeries during the first 12 months of the pilot and 741 referrals were made to groups, services and activities patients would not have otherwise accessed. The service attracted a highly experienced and skilled volunteer team to carry out the community navigator role. Most navigators have a previous or current career in healthcare, social services, teaching or counselling. The evaluation examines in detail: the impact on primary and secondary care; community navigation activities, outputs and outcomes; the social value; cost-benefit analysis; lessons, challenges and successes; and risk and opportunities. A set of key recommendations derived from the learning from the pilot are included.

Social prescribing: a review of the evidence

KINSELLA Sarah
2016

A brief review of the literature on social prescribing. Social prescribing is a way of linking primary care patients with psycho-social issues, with sources of appropriate, non-medical support in the community. Suitable referrals to social prescribing initiatives are vulnerable and at risk groups such as: people with mild to moderate depression and anxiety; low income single parents; recently bereaved older people; people with long term conditions and frequent attendees in primary and secondary care. The review highlights that prescribed activities have typically included arts and creative activities, physical activity, learning and volunteering opportunities and courses, self-care and support with practical issues such as benefits, housing, debt and employment. The evidence on the impact of social prescribing is currently limited and inconsistent. While some initiatives have shown improved outcomes for patients and potential for cost-savings (in the longer term), few have been subject to economic analysis or the kind of rigorous evaluation which would inform commissioners. The report recommends that any new, local social prescribing initiatives should aim to add to the current evidence base and conduct transparent and thorough.

The social and economic impact of the Rotherham Social Prescribing Pilot: main evaluation report

DAYSON Chris, BASHIR Nadia
2014

Provides a detailed assessment of the social and economic impact of the Rotherham Social Prescribing Pilot from the perspective of key stakeholders. Social prescribing provides a way of linking patients in primary care and their carers with nonmedical sources of support within the community. Over the course of the pilot: 24 voluntary and community organisations (VCOs) received grants with a total value of just over £600,000 to deliver a menu of 31 separate social prescribing services; 1,607 patients were referred to the service, of whom 1,118 were referred on to funded VCS services; the five most common types of funded services referred to were information and advice, community activity, physical activities, befriending and enabling. The evaluation looked at the impact on the demand for hospital care and the economic and social benefits. The findings demonstrate that economic and social outcomes have been created for three main stakeholder groups: patients with LTCs and their carers, who have experienced improved mental health and greater engagement with the community; the local public sector, in particular health bodies, which have benefited from the reduced use of hospital resources; and the local voluntary and community sector, which has benefited from a catalytic investment in community level service provision.

Social prescribing for mental health: a guide to commissioning and delivery

FRIEDLI Lynne
2008

This guidance describes the use of non-medical interventions, sometimes called ‘social prescribing’ or ‘community referral’, to improve mental health and wellbeing. Social prescribing supports improved access both to psychological treatments and to interventions addressing the wider determinants of mental health. It can contribute to greater awareness of the relative contribution to mental wellbeing of individual psychological skills and attributes (e.g. autonomy, positive affect and self-efficacy) and the circumstances of people’s lives: housing, employment, income and status. The guide: examines the benefits of social prescribing; outlines the policy context and evidence base for social prescribing; gives guidance on commissioning social prescribing; provides information on interventions and how to deliver social prescribing; and describes the findings of a social prescribing development project commissioned by Care Services Improvement Partnership (CSIP) North West. Overall, the guidance aims to support localities in developing, implementing and evaluating social prescribing schemes, with a special focus on mental health and wellbeing. The report recommends that social prescribing is made available as part of prevention and early intervention within primary care, and also to support recovery from severe mental distress.

Evidence to inform the commissioning of social prescribing

UNIVERSITY OF YORK. Centre for Reviews and Dissemination
2015

Summarises the findings of a rapid appraisal of available evidence on the effectiveness of social prescribing. Social prescribing is a way of linking patients in primary care with sources of support within the community, and can be used to improve health and wellbeing. For the review searches were conducted on the databases: DARE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and NHS EED for relevant systematic reviews and economic evaluations. Additional searches were also carried out on MEDLINE, ASSIA, Social Policy and Practice, NICE, SCIE and NHS. Very little good quality evidence was identified. Most available evidence described evaluations of pilot projects but failed to provide sufficient detail to judge either success or value for money. The briefing calls for better evaluation of new schemes. It recommends that evaluation should be of a comparative design; examine for whom and how well a scheme works; the effect it has and its costs.

Books on prescription

Warwickshire County Council

Warwickshire County Council in 2009 launched a local initiative whereby people are helped to manage a range of commonly experienced mental health problems, including depression, anxiety and stress through the prescription of accredited self-help titles, available in their local public library. Books can be prescribed by GPs or other health professionals. The scheme is entirely confidential - staff do not give out or keep information about who is borrowing the book or what it is about.

Prevention in Bexley

London Borough of Bexley

The London Borough of Bexley is currently supporting different groups of people using a prevention approach: promoting citizenship for adults with learning disabilities; following a community-based recovery model in mental health day services and providing an integrated reablement service to enable older people to regain their independence and stay in their homes for longer.

Co-producing approaches to the management of dementia through social prescribing

BAKER Keith, IRVING Adele
2015

A promising approach to the management of dementia is ‘social prescribing’. Social prescribing is a form of ‘co-production’ that involves linking patients with non-clinical activities, typically delivered by voluntary and community groups, in an effort to improve their sense of well-being. The success of social prescribing depends upon the ability of boundary-spanning individuals within service delivery organisations to develop referral pathways and collaborative relationships through ‘networks’. This article examines the operation of a pilot social prescribing programme in the North East of England, targeted at older people with early onset dementia and depression, at risk of social isolation. It is argued that the scheme was not sustained, in part, because the institutional logics that governed the actions of key boundary-spanning individuals militated against the collaboration necessary to support co-production.

Results 21 - 30 of 30

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