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Results for 'voluntary sector'

Results 11 - 20 of 29

Altogether Better working together to create healthier people and communities: bringing citizens and services together in new conversations

ALTOGETHER BETTER
2015

An evaluation report of the Altogether Better Wellbeing 2 Programme, working with citizens and services keen to find new ways to improve the health and well-being of their local community. Through the two year programme, funded by the Big Lottery Fund, people were invited to become health champions, they were then nurtured as a group and encouraged to take action to improve local health and well-being in ways that their local NHS or statutory services wanted to support. The report finds that champions, and participants in the groups and activities that they have run, have benefited significantly from their involvement in a wide range of activities; with over 98 per cent reporting increased involvement in social activities and social groups and over 86 per cent reporting increased levels of confidence, well-being and new knowledge related to health and well-being. The NHS and statutory organisations have come to a greater recognition of the resourcefulness and generosity of the citizens who use their services. They are beginning to recognise that it is legitimate and effective for them to divert more of their time and resources into supporting volunteers who themselves support the health and well-being of their communities. This in turn raises the possibility of these organisations radically changing the way they provide services. The report concludes by arguing that the success of the approach depends critically on the quality of the working relationship between health champions and their organisation and that there are grounds for optimism, as a result of these relationships, that support for health champions will be sustainable into the long term, becoming simply ‘how we do things round here’.

The social and economic impact of the Rotherham Social Prescribing Pilot: main evaluation report

DAYSON Chris, BASHIR Nadia
2014

Provides a detailed assessment of the social and economic impact of the Rotherham Social Prescribing Pilot from the perspective of key stakeholders. Social prescribing provides a way of linking patients in primary care and their carers with nonmedical sources of support within the community. Over the course of the pilot: 24 voluntary and community organisations (VCOs) received grants with a total value of just over £600,000 to deliver a menu of 31 separate social prescribing services; 1,607 patients were referred to the service, of whom 1,118 were referred on to funded VCS services; the five most common types of funded services referred to were information and advice, community activity, physical activities, befriending and enabling. The evaluation looked at the impact on the demand for hospital care and the economic and social benefits. The findings demonstrate that economic and social outcomes have been created for three main stakeholder groups: patients with LTCs and their carers, who have experienced improved mental health and greater engagement with the community; the local public sector, in particular health bodies, which have benefited from the reduced use of hospital resources; and the local voluntary and community sector, which has benefited from a catalytic investment in community level service provision.

Delivering a healthier future: how CCGs are leading the way on prevention and early diagnosis

NHS CLINICAL COMMISSIONERS
2016

Focusing on prevention and early diagnosis, the case studies in this publication demonstrate the impact clinical commissioning groups are making in a wide range of areas including mental health care, early diagnosis of cancer and stroke prevention. They show how CCGs are taking the lead in preventing illness and the causes of ill health – and working to keep people out of hospital where possible; how they are helping to ensure that people are diagnosed earlier and given the support that they need; and they are working across boundaries to build on what people want and need to help them lead longer, healthier lives. More specifically the case studies provide examples of: working proactively with older people living with frailty; addressing preventable early deaths; supporting people to prevent and manage diabetes; reducing hospital admissions in people with COPD; managing c. difficile infections in the community; improving access to health services for homeless people; taking a strategic approach to stroke prevention; addressing early diagnosis of cancer; earlier diagnosis and prevention of HIV; improving early diagnosis and treatment of people with atrial fibrillation; working with the voluntary sector; impact of Living Well; and social prescribing to improve outcomes.

Improving the health and wellbeing of communities

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION
2014

This paper is part of the ‘Tailor-made’ series, which aims to demonstrate the valuable contribution that the community sector makes to people’s lives and society as a whole. Specifically, this paper explores the significant role that community groups play in improving the health and wellbeing of communities. Key points include: the community sector is well placed to support wellness, rather than just treat illness through connecting organisations and supporting people with wider factors that affect health, including poverty, education and social isolation; the community sector has unique qualities that allow it to provide tailor-made support - they are trusted and understand the needs of their community, they can reach people that find it hard to access traditional support and they take a person-centred approach meaning they can support people’s multiple-needs; the community sector contributes significant social and economic value by improving physical and mental health, improving quality of life and reducing health inequalities.

Joint review of investment in voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations in health and care sector

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health, et al
2015

This report summarises the initial findings of a review developed in co-production with the statutory and voluntary sectors, exploring how the sector could: maximise and demonstrate its impact; build sustainability and capacity; promote equality and address health inequalities. From January to March 2015 around 4,500 people and organisations were consulted, sharing their views on the current state of the statutory and VCSE sectors, the key challenges they face, including reduced funding, and the potential of the sector, particularly in relation to equality and health inequalities, prevention and resilience, and personalisation and co-production.

Supporting influence on health and wellbeing boards: report from survey 2015

REGIONAL VOICES
2015

This report lays out the results from a survey for the voluntary and community sector (VCS), between December 2014 and January 2015, about how it is engaging with health and wellbeing boards. 119 people responded sharing their experiences from across England. While some good practice for how boards involve the VCS is emerging, some challenges remain. VCS appears to be under-utilised by local partners in health and care. Although there is considerable desire in the VCS to work with HWBs, only 22 per cent of respondents reported being able to link in with local Healthwatch or a sub-group of the HWB and around 30 per cent were able to raise issues with a VCS representative and only 9 per cent of respondents felt their organisation was linked with the work of the HWB (a reduction since the last survey). There is strong awareness that resources for local engagement are limited - with reduced capacity of local authority officers, commissioners (health and LA), the VCS and Healthwatch to work together. VCS organisations ask for clearer routes of engagement; timely involvement; and for information about developments to be shared from the board.

Social action: harnessing the potential: a discussion paper

GREAT BRITAIN. Cabinet Office
2015

This discussion paper explains what social action is and how it plays an important role in helping to respond to long-standing challenges. Social action is about people coming together to help improve their lives and solve the problems that are important in their communities. The paper provides an update on government programmes to develop its reach and impact. It sets out how social action: empowers local groups, enabling local solutions and building resilient communities; increases the resources available to achieve social goals; offers new sources of expertise and knowledge; enables broader and better targeted support; creates new models for how society can respond to challenges; and helps reduce demands on public services.

Community-led care and support: a new paradigm

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2015

Reports on the key messages from a roundtable discussion on community-led care. The event was hosted by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) and is one of a series of roundtable discussions exploring how to improve care and support at a time of growing demand, demographic change and financial constraint. The discussion aimed to identify, celebrate, support and learn from community-led activity and support and identify practical steps stakeholders can take to support community-led services. The report includes summaries of the presentations from those attending from the organisations: Skillnet Group Community Interest Company, Community Catalysts, Carers UK, Sheffield City Council, and Lloyds Bank Foundation. It also includes views from the round table. Key messages from the event are summarised in four key areas: the positive impact of community-led services; challenges and barriers; building and sustaining community-led services, and enabling community-led services to thrive. The roundtable identified the need to reduce the unnecessary barriers that small, local, user-led services often face in terms of regulations and in building up evidence to support commissioning and investment.

The prevention revolution: transforming health and social care

ACEVO. Taskforce on Prevention in Health
2013

This report sets out a number of recommendations aimed at shifting focus and investment towards the provision of integrated, preventative care and support. It looks at three key areas: changing the culture and practices at the local level; changing national-level frameworks and incentives; and the role of long-term investment in driving transformation. The report calls for a ‘prevention revolution’, in which preventative support, advice and treatment is fully integrated into all stages of the care pathway, with the aim of addressing the wider determinants of ill-health, supporting people to manage long-term conditions more effectively, and providing treatment and support in community settings wherever possible, reducing the need for treatment in acute settings. Throughout the report, there is an emphasis on the role played by voluntary organisations in: providing preventative, holistic care in community settings; fostering innovation; strengthening patient engagement; and catalysing cultural change.

A guide to community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing: full report

SOUTH Jane
2015

Outlines a 'family' of approaches for evidence-based community-centred approaches to health and wellbeing. The report presents the work undertaken in phase 1 of the 'Working with communities: empowerment evidence and learning' project, which was initiated jointly by PHE and NHS England to draw together and disseminate research and learning on community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing. The report provides a guide to the case for change, the concepts, the varieties of approach that have been tried and tested and sources of evidence. The new family of community-centred approaches outlined in this document represents some of the available options that can be used to improve health and wellbeing, grouped around four different strands: strengthening communities - where approaches involve building on community capacities to take action together on health and the social determinants of health; volunteer and peer roles - where approaches focus on enhancing individuals' capabilities to provide advice, information and support or organise activities around health and wellbeing in their or other communities; collaborations and partnerships - where approaches involve communities and local services working together at any stage of planning cycle, from identifying needs through to implementation and evaluation; and access to community resources - where approaches connect people to community resources, practical help, group activities and volunteering opportunities to meet health needs and increase social participation.

Results 11 - 20 of 29

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