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Results for 'wellbeing'

Results 1 - 10 of 68

Report of the annual social prescribing network conference

SOCIAL PRESCRIBING NETWORK
2016

Report of the annual social prescribing network conference, which sets out a definition of social prescribing, outlines principles for effective service provision and the steps needed to evaluate and measure the impact of social prescribing. It also includes an analysis of a pre-conference survey, completed by 78 participants to explore their experience of social prescribing. Key ingredients identified that underpin social prescribing included: funding, healthcare professional buy-in, simple referral process, link workers with appropriate training, patient centred care, provision of services, patient buy-in and benefits of social prescribing. The benefits of social prescribing fell into six broad headings: physical and emotional health and wellbeing; behaviour change; cost effectiveness and sustainability; capacity to build up the voluntary community; local resilience and cohesion; and tackling the social determinants of ill health. Afternoon sessions covered the following topics: obtaining economic data on social prescribing; engaging different stakeholders in social prescribing; standards and regulations that could be applied to social prescribing services; qualities and skills necessary to commission high quality social prescribing services; designing research studies on social prescribing. Short case studies are included. There was consensus from participants that social prescribing provides potential to reduce pressures on health and care services through referral to non-medical, and often community-based, sources of support.

Understanding local needs for wellbeing data measures and indicators

BROWN Helen, ADBALLAH Saamah, TOWNSELY Ruth
2017

This report presents a new Local Wellbeing Indicator set for local authorities, public health leaders and Health and Wellbeing boards to help local decision-makers better understand the wellbeing of their local populations, and how they can act to improve it. The set is the product of a six-month scoping project co-commissioned by the Office for National Statistics (ON) and Public Health England (PHE), in collaboration with the What Works Centre for Wellbeing and Happy City. The report outlines the rationale for the selection of indicators, details the methodology used, and presents the indicators. The final framework consists of an ‘ideal’ set and a ‘currently available’ set of Local Wellbeing indicators, recognising that some of the indicators proposed in the ideal set are not yet available at the local authority level. The ‘ideal’ set is based on a core of 26 indicators of individual wellbeing and its determinants. The ‘currently available’ set contains 23 indicators. Both the ‘ideal’ and ‘currently available’ sets are built around seven domains: personal wellbeing, economy, education and childhood, equality, health, place and social relationships. The report also includes recommendations for additional ‘deeper dive’ support indicators that provide more detailed insight in specific areas and contexts. The indicators aim to meet the need for a practical local translation of the Measuring National Wellbeing programme Office, introduced by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) in 2011.

A summary of Age UK's Index of Wellbeing in Later Life

GREEN Marcus, et al
2017

The Wellbeing in Later Life Index, developed by Age UK and the University of Southampton, provides a measure to assess the wellbeing of older people in the UK. The measure looked at wellbeing across 40 indicators covering five key areas – social, personal (living arrangements, thinking skills, family status), health, financial and environmental. This report summarises the work carried out to develop the index and presents results of an analysis of data from 15,000 people aged 60. It provides a picture of older people’s wellbeing across the population and factors that contributed to people having the highest and lowest wellbeing scores. The analysis found that a range of factors under each of the key areas play a part in contributing to a person’s overall sense of wellbeing in later life. It also identified a large gap between older people with the highest and lowest wellbeing. The results identified the importance of being engaged in the world around you, whether through social or creative or physical activities or belonging to a community group. Other domains also played a supporting role, as adequate income, good health, good social network, and access to local facilities make it easier to participate in society. Those in the lowest wellbeing group were more likely to report being on means-tested benefits, having poor health and low satisfaction with local services.

Enabling change through communities of practice: Wellbeing Our Way

KOUSSA Natalie
2017

Summarises learning from a National Voices programme, Wellbeing Our Way, which aimed to explore how communities of practice could contribute to large-scale change across the health and care voluntary and community sector. The programme brought together people from charities, community organisations and people with experience of using health and care services to enable people to increase their knowledge and skills around a range of person- and community-centred approaches. The report provides an overview and learning from the national communities of practice and from two place-based communities of practice in Greater Manchester, which focused on peer support and self-management. Key learning for facilitating change through communities of practice identified includes: the importance of co-design; good facilitation; identifying specific expertise within the community of practice; having a clear area of focus of the community; having a clearly defined goal when looking to enable organisational change; and involving senior leaders to increase the chance of encouraging change. Individuals involved in the programme also explain how it has helped them initiate change in their practice and organisation. Results from the programme evaluation found that 79 per cent of participants were able to increase their knowledge and skills and 64 per cent were enabled, partly enabled, to create change in their organisation.

Social prescribing and health and well-being

WELSH NHS CONFEDERATION
2017

This briefing paper sets out the important role that social prescribing has on the health and well-being of the population in Wales and highlights some of the social prescribing initiatives already in place which show how patients are benefiting from integrated, person-centred and non-medical services. The initiatives include the Valleys Steps programme which considers alternatives for seeking medical treatment for ongoing mental health issues; Gofal Community Food Co-ops, which provide opportunities for mental health patients to interact with members of the local community; and Care and Repair Cymru’s Warm Homes Prescription Scheme. It also highlights existing evidence which shows the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of social prescribing.

Ways to Wellbeing

York Council for Voluntary Service

Ways to Wellbeing York is a social prescribing service which aims to improve health and wellbeing through working with people referred by GPs to identify their needs and identify local services offering non-medical interventions which may be able to help. The pilot which started in 2016 offers a whole system approach to wellbeing, enabling people attending their GP to be referred to a range of support providing by over 40 voluntary and community services in the city. The service is hosted by York CVS and funded by the City Council and currently offers access to social prescription referrals through four surgeries in York based in areas of greater deprivation. The longer term aim if funding is secured is to provide a city-wide service with a target of 1,000 referrals.

Herts Independent Living Service

Hertfordshire Independent Living Service

Hertfordshire Independent Living Service (HILS) was established with support from Hertfordshire County Council in 2007 to provide a meals on wheels service. HILS has developed over the last ten years to provide a range of caring services to support vulnerable and older people to live happily, healthily, and independently at home. HILS supports local statutory health and social care partners by offering much-needed services to some of the most vulnerable living independently in Hertfordshire, which are easily accessed by professionals through established referral processes.

Dance to Health: evaluation of the pilot programme

AESOP
2017

Outlines the results of Aesop's falls prevention dance programme for older people, Dance to Health. This arts based intervention address older people's falls and problems with some current falls prevention exercise programmes, by incorporating evidence-based exercise programmes into creative, social and engaging dance activity. The programme was developed using the Aesop 7-item checklist, which lists the features an arts programme should have for it to be taken up by the health system and made available to every patient who could benefit. The report outlines the rationale for creating the programme, the outcomes achieved - in addition to reduced falls, cost effectiveness, and the wider impact of the programme. It reports that the pilot successfully brought people from the worlds of dance and older people's exercise together, was able to train dance artists in the evidence-based falls programme, and also developed six evidence-based falls prevention programmes with 196 participants. A total of 73 per cent of participants achieved the target of 50 hours’ attendance over the six months, compared with a national average for completing standard falls prevention exercise programmes of 31 per cent for primary prevention and 46 per cent for secondary prevention. Additional outcomes identified included increases in group identification, relationships and reduced loneliness, functional health and wellbeing, and mental health and wellbeing.

A very general practice: how much time do GPs spend on issues other than health

CAPER Kathleen, PLUNKETT James
2015

Drawing on the results of interviews with 824 general practitioners (GPs) in England carried out in 2015, this briefing looks at the amount of time and money GPs spend dealing with non-health issues. GPs responding to the survey report spending almost a fifth of their time on social issues that are not principally about health, including relationship problems, housing, unemployment and social isolation. This time has an implied cost to the health service of almost £400 million a year. Although approximately half the GPs surveyed said that time spent on non-health issues helped them understand their local community, this can leave less time for other patients' health care needs. In addition, many issues raised with GPs, require specialist knowledge that many GPs do not have. Whist the report acknowledges that discussion of non-health issues can be helpful in developing GP-patient relationships, it concludes that finding other ways to meet some of the non-health demand facing GPs would free up time and money to be reinvested in patient care. Possible suggestions put forward include the co-locating of non-health services and advice services in GP surgeries and ensuring GPs know how to best signpost patients to other local services in the community.

Social isolation and loneliness in the UK: with a focus on the use of technology to tackle these conditions

IOTUK
2017

This report provides an overview of social isolation and loneliness in the UK and highlights innovative uses of technology in addressing the issue. It considers the factors that contribute to the development of social isolation and loneliness, the people most at risk, the impact on an individual's health and wellbeing, and the impact on public services. It outlines three main approaches and interventions used to address social isolation and loneliness: enabling people to maintain existing relationships, facilitating the creation of new connections, and psychological approaches to change the perceptions of individuals that are suffering from loneliness. In particular, it highlights innovative uses of technology to show their potential to increase access to initiatives and deliver interventions in new ways. Local and international best practice case-studies are included. The final section looks at the challenges that exist when trying to finance interventions aiming to combat social isolation and loneliness, and introduces an outcome-based financing model, Social Impact Bonds, which has the potential to allow commissioners and delivery partners to deliver more innovative solutions.

Results 1 - 10 of 68

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