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Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

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Results for 'wellbeing'

Results 21 - 30 of 44

Measuring mental wellbeing in children and young people

BRYANT Gillian, HEARD Heather, WATSON Jo
2015

This document outlines the importance of measuring mental wellbeing in children and young people. It is intended to provide guidance on the use of targeted, evidence driven intelligence and practical support to those wishing to develop local joint strategic needs assessments (JSNAs) and the evaluation of interventions which improve the mental wellbeing of children and young people. In particular, the briefing examines what children and young people’s mental wellbeing is, and why is it important; it describes some of the tools which are currently available to measure mental wellbeing and identify its determinants; it discusses risk and protective factors; and explains how using intelligence can improve children and young people’s outcomes. The technical appendix has measures to quantify mental wellbeing and its determinants, information on using the measures and links to examples of evidence based practice.

Growing healthy communities: the Health and Wellbeing Index

GRANT THORNTON UK LLP
2015

This report highlights the extent to which economic, social and environmental determinants translate to good or bad health outcomes in their broadest sense. It also shows the scale and nature of inequality across the country and reiterates the need for a local, place-based approach to tackling health outcomes. The report is based on league tables that assess 33 key health determinants and outcomes at local authority district level. The analysis reveals that the top three determinants that most strongly correlate to health outcomes are child poverty, deprivation and unemployment. Crime ranks as only seventh strongest with childhood education, social cohesions and occupations all proven as having a bigger impact on overall health outcomes. Case studies from Barnet, Greenwich and Richmond and Kingston outline some of the lessons that can be learnt from these and where collaboration has been seen to address an area’s determinants to improve health outcomes. That nine of the ten fall within London, where the boundaries of health commissioning are coterminous with those of the local authority may imply more readily facilitated joint-working leading to improved outcomes.

Community capital: the value of connected communities

PARSFIELD Matthew, et al
2015

The final report of the Connected Communities for Mental Wellbeing and Social Inclusion programme, which looked at how different interventions can contribute to the development of resilient, inclusive communities with higher wellbeing. This report examines how interventions affect relationships and attitudes, and how relationships and attitudes affect individuals' and communities' ability to develop social value. The programme involved a survey residents in seven ward-sized localities, an analysis of the data for insight into local social networks and wellbeing, and work with local people to develop projects to support social connections. Results found that community-led action and targeted interventions can strengthen local communities and lead to substantial benefits. It is argued that by investing in interventions which build and strengthen networks of social relationships, four kinds of social value or ‘dividend’ shared by people in the community will develop: wellbeing, citizenship, capacity, and an economic dividend through improved employability and health.

Bibliography and map of community-centred interventions for health and wellbeing

BAGNALL A.M., et al
2015

This bibliography and map present the results of a scoping review undertaken as part of a national knowledge translation project ‘Working with Communities – Empowerment, Evidence and Learning’ (2014-2015), jointly funded and steered by NHS England and Public Health England (PHE). This project aimed to support better, more effective working with communities on health and wellbeing through improving access to existing evidence and learning. The first part of this report presents the bibliography, with a total of 168 publications organised into types of study/resource, whether they relate specifically to UK practice or are non-UK studies covering international research. The second part of the report describes the scoping review methods and results of the mapping, in terms of the spread of evidence resources and characteristics. In terms of the types of outcomes that were reported in the included studies, process outcomes (i.e. how an intervention was implemented) were the most frequently reported, followed by service delivery and organisational outcomes, wellbeing outcomes and health outcomes. Economic outcomes were reported in 43 studies, and outcomes relating to the social determinants of health were reported in only 41 studies. Wellbeing outcomes were slightly more likely to be reported at a community level than were health outcomes.

Peer support for people with dementia: a social return on investment (SROI) study

SEMPLE Amy, WILLIS Elizabeth, de WAAL Hugo
2015

Reports on a study using Social Return on Investment (SROI) analysis to examine the impact and social value of peer support groups as an intervention for people with dementia. Three peer support groups in South London participated in the study. A separate SROI analysis was carried out for each individual group to find out what people valued about the groups and how they helped them. The report presents the outcomes for each group, the indicators for evidencing these outcomes and the quality and duration of outcomes experienced. It then provides detail on the methodology used to calculate the impact and the social return on investment. Overall, the study found that peer support groups provide positive outcomes for people with dementia, their carers and the volunteers who support the groups. The benefits of participating in peer support groups included: reduced isolation and loneliness; increased stimulation, including mental stimulation; and increased wellbeing. Carers experienced a reduction in carer stress, carer burden and reduction in the feeling of loneliness. Volunteers had an increased sense of wellbeing through their engagement with the group, improved knowledge of dementia and gained transferrable skills. Overall the study found that for every pound (£) of investment the social value created by the three groups evaluated ranged from £1.17 to £5.18.

A call to action: commissioning for prevention

NHS ENGLAND
2013

This document sets out a framework intended to help clinical commissioning groups think about how to commission for effective prevention. Commissioning for prevention is one potentially transformative change that CCGs can make, together with Health and Wellbeing Boards and their other local partners. The paper argues that whether on grounds of health need, cost or public expectations the case for developing a wellness rather than solely an illness service is compelling. This can be achieved by effectively commissioning for prevention through the following steps: analysing the most important health problems at population level; working together with partners and the community, setting common goals or priorities; identifying high-impact prevention programmes focused on the top causes of premature mortality and chronic disability; planning the resource profile needed to deliver prevention goals; and measuring impact and experimenting rapidly.

Collaborative research between Aston Research Centre for Healthy Ageing (ARCHA) and the ExtraCare Charitable Trust: the final report

HOLLAND Carol, et al
2015

Report presenting findings from a longitudinal study to evaluate whether the ExtraCare Charitable Trust housing approach provides positive outcomes for healthy ageing which also results in health and social care cost savings. For the study 162 volunteer new residents were assessed prior to moving into ExtraCare accommodation in the 14 locations on their health, illness, well-being and level of activity. They were then assessed on the same measures at 6, 12 and 18 months after entry. Residents were compared against 39 control participants. The main focuse was to measure health, illness, well-being, activity and personal perceptions .Qualitative data were also collected through focus groups, interviews, and case studies to gather residents views and perceptions. Statistical modelling was used to identify the most important factors in predicting outcome measures of cost. Key findings identified: significant saving for NHS budgets, with total NHS costs reducing by 38% over a 12-month period for residents in the sample; a reduction in the duration of unplanned hospital stays; potential savings in the cost of social care; improvements in residents who were designated as in a 'pre-frail' state on entry to ExtraCare housing; and improvements in residents psychological wellbeing, memory and social interaction.

Nottinghamshire Micro-enterprise Project

Nottinghamshire County Council

Nottinghamshire County Council (NCC), in partnership with Community Catalysts CIC, have invested in and supported the growth of local micro-enterprises offering a broad range of care and support options. The aim was to ensure that local people have a high level of choice and diversity and are more likely to find support that is responsive to their personal needs. Micro-enterprises deliver care or support services with no more than five paid or unpaid full-time equivalent workers and are independent of any parent organisation.

Psychological Support Service

Age UK Warwickshire

Age UK Warwickshire’s Psychological Support Services provide a range of interventions aimed at improving wellbeing and supporting older people across the county. This includes ‘Support, Time and Recovery’ (STR), a service aimed at improving the wellbeing, increasing the self-management and preventing the isolation, of adults aged over 55 diagnosed with depression, anxiety or stress.

Building community-based support with older people: evidence from other research reports

OUTSIDE THE BOX
2015

This report, developed as a resource for community groups, draws on recent key reports, discussion papers and research studies to present evidence on creating and sustaining community-based support for older people, including those which older people lead. It provides definitions of terms and approaches used in community-based support; outlines the current the policy context in Scotland; and then provides an overview of the main findings on community capacity building, changes in public services and the impacts for older people. Points raised in the evidence include: older people who need extra support generally know what will make life better for them; community-based activities that focus on older people's wellbeing complement other services; and that providing community-based solutions and low-level support to older people before they need greater support can prevent or reduce the need for higher intensity services, bring benefits and better outcomes to the people involved. The final section summarises findings from the individual reports and research reviews identified. Although the policy and practice context for the report focuses on the situation in Scotland, most of the reports featured in the review come from the experience of services based in England.

Results 21 - 30 of 44

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