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Results for 'wellbeing'

Results 51 - 60 of 68

Collaborative research between Aston Research Centre for Healthy Ageing (ARCHA) and the ExtraCare Charitable Trust: the final report

HOLLAND Carol, et al
2015

Report presenting findings from a longitudinal study to evaluate whether the ExtraCare Charitable Trust housing approach provides positive outcomes for healthy ageing which also results in health and social care cost savings. For the study 162 volunteer new residents were assessed prior to moving into ExtraCare accommodation in the 14 locations on their health, illness, well-being and level of activity. They were then assessed on the same measures at 6, 12 and 18 months after entry. Residents were compared against 39 control participants. The main focuse was to measure health, illness, well-being, activity and personal perceptions .Qualitative data were also collected through focus groups, interviews, and case studies to gather residents views and perceptions. Statistical modelling was used to identify the most important factors in predicting outcome measures of cost. Key findings identified: significant saving for NHS budgets, with total NHS costs reducing by 38% over a 12-month period for residents in the sample; a reduction in the duration of unplanned hospital stays; potential savings in the cost of social care; improvements in residents who were designated as in a 'pre-frail' state on entry to ExtraCare housing; and improvements in residents psychological wellbeing, memory and social interaction.

Nottinghamshire Micro-enterprise Project

Nottinghamshire County Council

Nottinghamshire County Council (NCC), in partnership with Community Catalysts CIC, have invested in and supported the growth of local micro-enterprises offering a broad range of care and support options. The aim was to ensure that local people have a high level of choice and diversity and are more likely to find support that is responsive to their personal needs. Micro-enterprises deliver care or support services with no more than five paid or unpaid full-time equivalent workers and are independent of any parent organisation.

Psychological Support Service

Age UK Warwickshire

Age UK Warwickshire’s Psychological Support Services provide a range of interventions aimed at improving wellbeing and supporting older people across the county. This includes ‘Support, Time and Recovery’ (STR), a service aimed at improving the wellbeing, increasing the self-management and preventing the isolation, of adults aged over 55 diagnosed with depression, anxiety or stress.

Building community-based support with older people: evidence from other research reports

OUTSIDE THE BOX
2015

This report, developed as a resource for community groups, draws on recent key reports, discussion papers and research studies to present evidence on creating and sustaining community-based support for older people, including those which older people lead. It provides definitions of terms and approaches used in community-based support; outlines the current the policy context in Scotland; and then provides an overview of the main findings on community capacity building, changes in public services and the impacts for older people. Points raised in the evidence include: older people who need extra support generally know what will make life better for them; community-based activities that focus on older people's wellbeing complement other services; and that providing community-based solutions and low-level support to older people before they need greater support can prevent or reduce the need for higher intensity services, bring benefits and better outcomes to the people involved. The final section summarises findings from the individual reports and research reviews identified. Although the policy and practice context for the report focuses on the situation in Scotland, most of the reports featured in the review come from the experience of services based in England.

Measuring national well-being: an analysis of social capital in the UK

SIEGLER Veronique
2015

This article provides a baseline analysis of social capital in the UK, using the latest available data. The data are based on 25 headline measures proposed by the Office for National Statistics, which cover four key aspects of social capital: personal relationships, social network support, civic engagement and trust and cooperative norms. Key findings include: around 1 in 10 people in the UK reported feeling lonely all, most, or more than half of the time in 2011/12 and just over a third said that they wish they could spend more time with their family and have more social contact. Nearly 1 in 5 people reported looking after or giving special help to someone sick, disabled or elderly and nearly a fifth of people had given unpaid help or worked as a volunteer in a local, national or international organisation or charity in the last 12 months in 2012/13. Half of people reported being very or quite interested in politics and around two-thirds thought people in their neighbourhood could be trusted. Nearly three-quarters of people felt people in their neighbourhood get along with each other and are willing to help each other.

Occupational therapy and physical activity interventions to promote the mental health wellbeing of older people in primary care and residential care: evidence update March 2015

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
2015

Summarises selected new evidence published since the original literature search was conducted for the NICE guidance 16 Occupational therapy and physical activity interventions to promote the mental health wellbeing of older people in primary care and residential care (2008). A search was conducted for new evidence from 1 June 2011 to 28 July 2014 and a total of 8,973 pieces of evidence were initially identified. The 21 most relevant references underwent a critical appraisal process and then were reviewed by an Evidence Update Advisory Group, which advised on the final list of 6 items selected for the Evidence Update. The update provides detailed commentaries on the new evidence focussing on the following themes: occupational interventions, physical activity, walking schemes, and training. It also highlights evidence uncertainties identified.

An analysis of the economic impacts of the British Red Cross Support at home service

DIXON Josie, et al
2014

This independent economic evaluation of the British Red Cross Support at Home service focuses on four services which were found to improve outcomes in an earlier British Red Cross evaluation. The services all aim to help people to build their confidence and regain their independence during times of particular difficulty.Those evaluated were 'Next Steps', where volunteers provide home visits and monitor how people are coping following hospital discharge; 'Care in the Home' services delivered by staff and volunteers providing social visits, support and help with household tasks; and a Neighbourhood/Community service in Scotland which focused on linking people to existing services and volunteer-led services such as befriending. The final sample for this analysis consisted of a total of 52 people, the majority of who were over 65. Two outcomes were used in the economic analysis: an increased ability to manage daily activities and improved wellbeing. The evaluation identified cost savings that were related to a reduced need for formal/ informal care and general help around the home; a reduced risk of falls and malnutrition, particularly amongst those with unmet care needs; and, to a lesser degree, a reduced need for treatment of depressive symptoms. The total savings identified amounted to more than five times the cost of the service. The average cost of the intervention was £169 per person (based on the services and sample data in the Red Cross evaluation) and the identified savings came to £880 per person.

Guidance for commissioning public mental health services

JOINT COMMISSIONING PANEL FOR MENTAL HEALTH
2013

The Joint Commissioning Panel for Mental Health (JCP-MH) is a new collaboration co-chaired by the Royal College of General Practitioners and the Royal College of Psychiatrists, which brings together leading organisations and individuals with an interest in commissioning for mental health and learning disabilities. Public mental health involves: an assessment of the risk factors for mental disorder, the protective factors for wellbeing, and the levels of mental disorder and wellbeing in the local population; the delivery of appropriate interventions to promote wellbeing, prevent mental disorder, and treat mental disorder early; and ensuring that people at ‘higher risk’ of mental disorder and poor wellbeing are proportionately prioritised in assessment and intervention delivery. This guide is about the commissioning of public mental health interventions to reduce the burden of mental disorder, enhance mental wellbeing, and support the delivery of a broad range of outcomes relating to health, education and employment. It is the second version of the public mental health guide: It has been revised and updated to include new sources of data and information.

Commissioning befriending: a guide for adult social care commissioners

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2014

A guide developed to inform commissioners of adult social care about how befriending services are being delivered across the South West and how to effectively commissioning high quality befriending services. It describes what befriending is; the different ways it can be delivered; and the positive benefits it can have through improving health, well being and increasing independence. It also explains how people and communities can be involved in delivering and developing services through volunteering. Case study examples of current befriending practice are used throughout. The guide also draws upon materials and guidance produced by the Mentoring and Befriending Foundation (MBF) and feedback from commissioners and befriending providers through a series of consultations undertaken by the MBF.

Supporting commissioners of assisted living services: stage 1: research report

CONSILIUM
2014

This report presents the findings of research to examine the skills and knowledge that are unique to those commissioning assisted living technologies (ALT). These technologies include : telecare; digital participation services which educate, entertain and encourage social interaction to enrich the lives of people in need of social support; and wellness services which encourage people to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles. They are referred to collectively as assistive living services (ALS). The research methodology included desk based review of the evidence and consultation with a range of local authority commissioners in England. The report presents a summary of different commissioning models used, provides examples of good practice and what is working well, areas that need improvement and challenges facing commissioners. It also discusses workforce development issues and measuring impact.

Results 51 - 60 of 68

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