Q&As

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What is a 'one-page profile'?

What is a 'one-page profile'?

A one-page profile is a simple summary of what is important to someone, how best to support them and what other people say about them (or what they say about themselves).

It can help care and support workers get to know the person they are supporting as an individual – not as a list of needs or conditions.

As a person working in health and social care, why do I need a one-page profile?

As a person working in health and social care, why do I need a one-page profile?

Your one-page profile helps your managers and colleagues know more about you as a person (for example, your interests and hobbies). It also tells everyone what they need to know or do to support you to be as effective in work as possible. This can make it more likely that you get the support you need to do your job well.

There is an ethical dimension to this too. If you expect others to complete a one-page profile, it's only fair that you complete one yourself.

As a member of the public, why do I need a one-page profile?

As a member of the public, why do I need a one-page profile?

Your one-page profile helps everyone you share it with to know more about you. It tells people what they need to do to support you when you are very busy or unwell.

Think of your profile as preparation for the future. None of us likes to consider that a time will come when we need support and can't tell others what we want. Sadly, health problems and ageing can place us in this situation.

If you care for family, friends or neighbours, exchanging information via one-page profiles can be of great help in promoting the happiness of everyone.

 

As a person using support services, why do I need a one-page profile?

As a person using support services, why do I need a one-page profile?

Your one-page profile helps everyone you share it with to know more about you. It tells people what they need to do to support you if you are unwell.

Think of your profile as preparation for the future. None of us likes to consider that a time will come when we can't tell others what we want. Sadly, health problems and ageing can place us in this situation quite suddenly.

Completing and exchanging profiles with everyone involved in your care can be a great way to learn about each other and promote the happiness of everyone.

Why should I help to complete a one-page profile for another person?

Why should I help to complete a one-page profile for another person?

You can't do a good job of supporting someone unless you know what matters to them and how they want to be supported.

A one-page profile is a way to record this information. This then makes it more likely that people can direct their own support and are supported in a person-centred way.

It also means that people don't have to share the same information over and over again.

What is the history of one-page profiles?

What is the history of one-page profiles?

They have their roots in a style of person-centred planning called Essential Lifestyle Planning, developed by Michael Smull and The Learning Community for Person Centered Practices.

Helen Sanderson (then the Department of Health expert adviser for person-centred practices) developed a shorter version on one page, originally to help her daughter Laura at school. Now they are used in education, health and social care, from antenatal classes to end of life.

 

What is 'personal data'?

What is 'personal data'?

'Personal data' is any information about a person that allows the person to be identified or named. The following are examples of 'personal data': names and addresses, birth dates, bank account details and national insurance numbers.

A one-page profile contains the person's name, but it should not contain other identifiable data of the type listed above.

Common sense also tells us not to include anything else on a profile that puts the person at risk (so don't write down details of where they keep the family silver, for example).

What is 'sensitive personal data'?

What is 'sensitive personal data'?

'Sensitive personal data' is information that is defined under the Data Protection Act 1988 as personal information relating to:

  • Sex life and sexual orientation
  • Race, religion and political beliefs
  • Trade union membership
  • Medical conditions
  • Criminal offences (alleged or proven)
  • Punishments received for proven offences

Sensitive personal data must be kept especially secure because revealing this type of data can cause problems for a person in their work or home life. This data must also be kept up to date and not stored for longer than is necessary.

How must data, including 'sensitive personal data', be stored?

How must data, including 'sensitive personal data', be stored?

All data (information about a person) must be kept secure.

For more information on data protection, see:

The Information Commissioner's Office

www.ico.gov.uk/for_organisations/data_protection.aspx

The Care Leavers' Association

www.careleavers.com/accesstorecords/dataprotection/act

 

How do I make sure I have a person's consent (agreement) to complete their one-page profile?

How do I make sure I have a person's consent (agreement) to complete their one-page profile?

Under the Data Protection Act 1988, consent must be given freely (without force) and explicitly (by the person writing or signing a document to say they give consent).

Consent can only be given by a person who has been fully informed about what they are consenting or agreeing to. So, you need to explain what a one-page profile is and how the information will be used, before a person can consent to having a one-page profile. You must also be sure that the person has understood your explanation.

Are one-page profiles only for people who have personal budgets?

Are one-page profiles only for people who have personal budgets?

One-page profiles are for anyone who would find them useful. There are schools where everyone – pupils and teachers – has a one-page profile. In many hospices a one-page profile is developed with the person when they are admitted.

They can form the first page of support plans for personal budgets in health and social care, and are key in the 0–25 Education, Health and Care Plans.

How do I find out more about one-page profiles and person-centred practices?

How do I find out more about one-page profiles and person-centred practices?

Completing a one-page profile is the best way to learn about them. When you've done this, go to the 'Resources list' on the 'Resources' tab. On this tab you'll find links to related information and resources.