SCIE Report 36: Enabling risk, ensuring safety: Self-directed support and personal budgets

Practitioner attitudes

'Practitioners may be selective in terms of [who] they offer cash payments, which can impact on opportunities for people with mental health problems, dementia or learning difficulties' (Arksey, 2008)

Attitudes to competence and capacity

In their 2007 review on attitudes to risk, Mitchell & Glendinning found very little research on physically disabled people or those with sensory impairments. Studies tended to concentrate on:

The majority of the research also focused on practitioners rather than people who use services.

Additional findings indicated that:

Findings on professional assumptions or anxieties about people with mental health problems were clear:

'…..the issue of competence on the part of the people with mental health difficulties was inextricably linked to widespread perceptions of their status as dangerous individuals.' (Spandler & Vick 2005).

This was particularly true for black people. This was reflected in other findings about black and minority ethnic people with mental health problems sometimes having less access to direct payments, often due to practitioner perceptions of risk.

Further reading

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