Understanding common induction

Common Induction Standard 1: Role of the health and social care worker

Standard 1 is divided into the following four parts:

Overview

It is important for all workers to know exactly what is expected of them in their role.

This standard deals with your responsibility in relation to the person you care for or support. It looks at the aims of your organisation and its values, how you work with others in relation to your professional role and how you record and share information.

This standard sets out the importance of good working relationships with:

  • the people you care for
  • your colleagues in the workplace
  • those you work with from other agencies.

Which CQC Essential Standards does this relate to?

  • Outcome 1: respecting and involving people who use services: People should be treated with respect, involved in discussions about their care and treatment and be able to influence how the service is run.
  • Outcome 6: cooperating with other providers: People should receive safe and coordinated care when they move between different services.
  • Outcome 7: safeguarding people who use services from abuse: People should be protected from abuse and staff should respect their human rights.
  • Outcome 21: records: People’s personal records, including medical records, should be accurate and kept safe and confidential.

Responsibilities and limits of your relationship with an individual

This is about your responsibility to people in your care. It is important to recognise that this is a professional relationship which has boundaries. One way to think about this is to consider how the relationship differs from your relationships with family and friends.

Consider the following statement:

For me, dignity is about seeing the individual person and respecting their own space and their way of life.

What do you think this means? Follow the link to SCIE’s Dignity in Care guide. It is worth noting that this approach is basic to everything you do in your work with people who use services.

Look at the following resources:

  • SCIE Care Skillsbase, Skills check 32: Understand the job: role of the Health and social care worker. This will help you understand a number of tasks that come with your role. You will also see how important it is to communicate clearly with the person you are caring for and the person you are responsible to.
  • The Codes of Practice for Social Care Workers. This covers a set of behaviours (and values) that you must adopt. It will help you to understand your responsibilities as well as the limits to your role.
  • Your job description. This should give you an outline of what your employer expects of you. If you don’t have one, ask for one.

Check your understanding

  • Think of an individual you care for or support. Write down what you do to support them.
  • Think about how you communicate with this person.
  • Refer to your job description. Note down anything you are not clear about and ask your supervisor or manager.

For discussion

  • How might you support someone you are providing care for to access a doctor?

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.

Working in ways that are agreed with your employer

Your employer will have policies and procedures in place that you will need to follow. Some of them come from various laws which govern the way we work (e.g. health and safety, confidentiality and equality). Others relate to good care practice and some explain how your particular employer expects things to be done. It is important that you know where to access such policies and who to ask about them.

Look at the following resources:

  • Care Skillsbase, Understand the job: role of the health and social care worker. Go to the section that discusses following the proper procedures. Answer the questions there.
  • Find out about the role of a care worker in a domiciliary care setting and in a care home setting for older people here: Social Care TV (2012).
  • Many employers provide a staff handbook. If you have access to one, make sure you read it carefully.

Check your understanding

  • Are there any policies or procedures that you don’t understand? Make a note of them and ask your supervisor or manager to explain further.

Did you know?

  • People at the frontline of services like yourself are important to providing good quality care.

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.

Working in partnership with others

It is essential that you work in partnership with other professionals, volunteers and carers in order to provide the best possible care. This includes paid and unpaid workers as well as friends and family. Other people such as relatives, health professionals will be able to provide useful information to help you in your work with service users and you may be able to provide useful information to support them.

Look at the following resources:

Skill Check 3: working together. Look at the diagram under ‘Care partnership’.  Now consider the following three questions:

  • What would you say was the shared goal of the care partnership?
  • Each person in the partnership has a role to play. No one role is more important than any other. Is this true? Why?
  • Good relationships are at the heart of care. Easy to say. What does it mean?

Check your understanding

  • Why do you think it is important to work in partnership?
  • Make a list of all the people you work with. What do they all do? How do you relate to them?
  • Think about a service user’s friends and family members. Should you relate to them in a different way to the way you relate to professionals?
  • When would trust between a carer and a service user be important? What about trust between two carers?
  • What might happen if the public lost confidence in our care service?

Did you know?

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.

Be able to handle information in agreed ways

A care or support worker has to learn how to best communicate with the people they work with. Some may not be able to hear. Some may not be able to understand even if they can hear. You will need to find out the best way of communicating with each individual. You will also need to know what to do with any information you receive and who you are able to share it with. In some circumstances you will find out things which you must share with your manager or supervisor even if this is something you find difficult.

Look at the following resources:

  • There is a section on communication in the SCIE Guide 15 Dignity in Care. Although some of it is more relevant to your employer, there is much to help you think about all the issues involved.
  • Sometimes people are unable to make decisions for themselves (they ‘lack capacity’). The Mental Capacity Act (MCA) is designed to assist in decision-making in these circumstances. SCIE’s learning resource on the MCA will help you to understand how to support people to make decisions.

Check your understanding

  • How does your record-keeping benefit the people you care for?
  • What communication skills do you need for record-keeping?
  • How could you improve your record-keeping skills?
  • Are you confident in your own ability to communicate clearly, both when speaking and writing? If not, ask your supervisor for ideas to help you improve.
  • Think of some situations where you may not be able to keep something confidential. Make a note of them and discuss them with your supervisor.
  • What does it mean ‘to lack capacity’? If you are still not sure, check with your supervisor.

Did you know?

  • Poor communication is very often the reason why things go wrong in care situations.

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.