Understanding common induction

Common Induction Standard 3: Communicate effectively

Standard 3 is divided into the following four parts:

Overview

Standard 3 covers the area of communication, both with the people you care for and their families, as well as your colleagues and other professionals. It looks at different types of communication as well as the related area of confidentiality. When communication breaks down, problems always follow.

If you are employed directly to support someone in their own home, how do you think this standard applies to you? The majority of people who work in care tend to do so because they find it rewarding and they want to make a difference. Whether you have worked in care for a long time or only recently started it is important to take time to reflect on how you practice in your role. This can be done in supervision and also by taking time to step back from your daily tasks.

One of the areas for reflection is how we communicate with others. We use communication to establish relationships with people whether personal or professional.

Which CQC Essential Standards does this relate to?

  • Outcome 1: Respecting and involving people who use services: People should be treated with respect, involved in discussions about their care and treatment and able to influence how the service is run.
  • Outcome 6: Cooperating with other providers: People should receive safe and coordinated care when they move between different services.

Importance of effective communication in the work setting

Apart from communicating with people you support, part of your role is communicating with colleagues and other professionals who also work with that person. For example, the person you support may need to see a doctor because of a health problem. How can you assist?  

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • Think of the people you care for. Choose three of them and explain how you communicate with them.
  • Think about how you communicate with other colleagues and professionals in relation to the person you support. In what way is it different?

Did you know?

  • Research shows that one of the things that promotes dignity in care is good communication. Follow the link to find out more about Dignity factors

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.

Meeting the communication and language needs, wishes and preferences of individuals

It is really important to recognise that people are individuals. The way you communicate with Mrs A will probably be different from the way you communicate with Mrs B. Similarly, each of them will communicate with you in different ways. You need to know what is important for each of them, including very basic things such as what they want to be called or how they like their tea. Every individual has different ways of communicating.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • How easy is it for you to communicate with the people you support? What are the problems? How do you think they can be solved?
  • Think of one person you work with who has problems with communication. Make a list of the ways you and your colleagues communicate with one another.

Did you know?

  • Sensory impairment can refer to the impairment of any of the senses, however, ‘dual sensory impairment’ usually refers to the impairment of hearing and vision. How might you communicate with someone with dual sensory impairment?

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.

Overcoming difficulties in promoting communication

You need to know how to break down difficulties in communication. Often a person’s care plan will help you in this. For example, it might say that because Mr C is deaf in his left ear, you need to stand so that you are facing his right-hand side. Communication can be facilitated with some service users by the use of images and symbols. Some people may not have a sensory impairment for there to be difficulties in communication: they may not have English as their first language or they may have a learning disability.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • On the left-hand side of the table, make a list of five things that can make communication difficult. Then make a note of any solutions you can think of.
  DIFFICULTY SOLUTION
1    
2    
3    
4    
5    

Did you know?  

  • It isn’t always obvious that someone finds communication difficult.

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.

Understanding principles and practices relating to confidentiality

If you work in social care you have privileged access to information about the people you care for. They depend on you and you become involved in their personal affairs. If the carer cannot be trusted to keep information safe, service users will feel insecure and unsafe. Confidentiality is the key to the confidence that people have in you as a social care worker. Confidence and confidentiality go hand in hand.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • On occasions, it may be appropriate for you to breach confidentiality. Make a list of the circumstances when this might happen and go through it with your supervisor.
  • Mrs B has just had a visit from her general practitioner (GP). He has told her some very upsetting news about her condition. She shares this news with you but asks you not to tell her son and daughter, as ‘she doesn’t want to worry them’. What do you do when her daughter asks you directly if her mother’s health is getting worse?

Did you know?

  • The right to confidentiality is guaranteed partly by the Data Protection Act, 1998, partly by the Human Rights Act 1998 and partly by common law.

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.