Understanding common induction

Common Induction Standard 4: Equality and inclusion

Standard 4 is divided into the following three parts:

Overview

Standard 4 covers equality and inclusion. Equality and inclusion relate to areas such as race, gender, disability, age, sexual orientation and religious beliefs. People have the same right to receive care whatever their background or beliefs. A care worker needs not only to be aware of this but also to be active in promoting it in their practice. Equality and inclusion apply not only to the people you support but also your work colleagues. They are two of the essential values which underpin social care.

If you are employed directly to support someone in their own home, how do you think equality and inclusion applies to you?

Which CQC Essential Standards does this relate to?

  • Outcome 1: respecting and involving people who use services: People should be treated with respect, involved in discussions about their care and treatment and able to influence how the service is run.
  • Outcome 7: safeguarding people who use services from abuse: People should be protected from abuse and staff should respect their human rights.

The value and the importance of equality and inclusion

Every care worker needs to understand what this means for them personally. Often it will mean reflecting on their own views and behaviour. Supervision can help with this. Equality and inclusion are a key part of social care. The  Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) is the government body set up to oversee this area and states:

A decent quality of life where people can live with dignity and respect is a basic human right. For millions today and many millions more in the future, only effective care and support has the power to translate that right from an aspiration into an everyday reality.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • What is meant by discrimination?
  • Think of one person you care for. Are there things you can do to make sure they are treated equally and included?
  • Why do think it is important that a care worker needs to know about differences in cultures?

Did you know?

  • Equality and inclusion are basic human rights – not a special category of behaviour.  In England there is a piece of legislation called The Equality Act 2010 which allows legal action to be taken in cases of discrimination.

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.

Providing inclusive support

A care worker needs to be able to support people in a way that maintains their dignity and self-esteem. Each person is an individual and needs to be treated as such. This can often be a challenge to care and support workers.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

Fill in the gaps using the words underneath. The first one has been done for you

Diversity (1) difference. Care work brings us (?) contact with people from diverse (i.e. different) backgrounds. Equality means treating people fairly. Everyone has the same right to be treated with dignity and (?). Discrimination means treating people unfairly. Discrimination happens when we (?) to respect individuals. Inclusion means (?) people in a way that makes them feel welcome. Treating individuals fairly and respecting the differences between them makes it (?) to include them.

Key: (1) means. (2) fail. (3) easier. (4) into. (5) including. (6) respect

Did you know?

  • If you don’t respect people’s dignity and treat everyone equally, you are not really seeing them as people in their own right.

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.

Access information, advice and support about equality and inclusion

There are various ways of obtaining information on diversity, equality and inclusion. You can access government websites that list all the current legislation in place to protect the rights of individuals. You can obtain leaflets to give to your service users informing them of their rights. You can contact certain groups, such as Age UK, who can supply materials to hand out to your service users on discrimination, equality and other issues. Your local library and Citizens’ Advice Bureau will also have some leaflets. You may need such information to help an individual who is seeking advice on a particular subject.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • York College has devised this Challenge Yourself quiz. See how well you can do.
  • Read your employer’s policy again. Do you understand it more clearly now?

Did you know? 

  • Equality and inclusion are extremely important in a successful care business.

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.