Understanding common induction

Common Induction Standard 7: Person-centred support

Standard 7 is divided into the following six parts:

Overview

Person-centred support  is about valuing and respecting  the person who is being supported. As a way of thinking about this you could start by reflecting on the sort of care you would like to receive. Here are some comments from people who are being supported in health and social care.

I want the people who care for me to:

  • be polite to me and my family
  • be careful not to embarrass me
  • help me do as much as I safely can for myself
  • let me be alone when I want
  • share what they know about me only with people who need to know.

Most important of all, I want the people who care for me to:

  • ask me how I want to be cared for
  • listen to me when I tell them.

If the people who care for me cannot look after me in the way I want, then I hope they will:

  • explain why not
  • find another way to care for me that I am happy with.

These comments can be found in SCIE’s Care Skillsbase, Skills check 01: Talking about the Principles of Care.

You will find the Care Skillsbase a useful resource as it covers 40 learning activities to develop your skills and knowledge.

Which CQC Essential Standards does this relate to?

  • Outcome 1: respecting and involving people who use services: People are treated with respect, involved in discussions about their care and treatment and are able to influence how the service is run.
  • Outcome 2: consent to care and treatment: Where people who use services have capacity, they receive care treatment and support that they agree to.
  • Outcome 4: care and welfare of people who use services: People experience safe and appropriate care and support that meets their needs and protects their rights.

Promote person-centred values in everyday work

Promoting person-centred values means carrying out your role in a way that respects the people you work with so that they can live the life that they choose to. This should not be any different from what you would want or expect should you need care and support. When you go about your day-to-day work you must always be aware of the individual person that you are providing the service for. You may see these values expressed in the following way: individuality, independence, privacy, partnership, choice, dignity, respect, rights, equality and diversity. 

In the course of your work you may come across the term ‘personalisation’. Personalisation is about enabling people to be more in control of the services they receive.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • Make a list of things which are important in person-centred care. Here is one – choice.
  • Why is person centred-care important?

Did you know?

  • Person-centred approach and personalisation share the same values and essentially try to achieve the same goal. Personalisation may be seen as the entire process whereas a person centred approach is one of the ways of bringing about personalisation.

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.

Working in a person-centred way

Your role is to help people choose the way their care needs are met and also to help them plan for the longer term. People’s choices will be different depending on the types of tasks you are doing together and their abilities. If a person makes a decision that you feel is risky, discuss your concerns with them, and if possible support them to understand the risks.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • Think of someone you care for and support. Make a list of things that would help you and others care for and support them in a person-centred way.
  • What type of things would you expect to see in a person-centred plan?
  • Check whether the people you work with have a person-centred care plan. If they haven’t, ask your supervisor why not.

Did you know?

  • People have a right to be treated as individuals. Their care plan should reflect this.

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.

Recognising possible signs of dementia

Dementia is a term used to describe the symptoms that occur when the brain is affected by certain diseases and conditions. They have in common a serious loss of brain function that is usually progressive. It is a fact that more and more people are suffering from dementia, however, you may see similar symptoms that are not signs of dementia but are related to other treatable conditions. For example, confusion may be caused by an infection or low mood by depression.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • Think of some of the individuals you work with who are diagnosed as having dementia. What symptoms do they show?
  • Thinking about the same people, make a list of what you find difficult  about working with them.
  • What are some of the feelings that a person with dementia may have?
  • What might help you to work more effectively with a person with dementia?

Did you know?

  • The number of people with dementia in the UK is expected to double in the next 30 years.

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.

Supporting active participation

People who use services have a right to be seen as individuals with different preferences, skills and abilities. Respecting this basic right means involving them in the way their care and support is delivered. It is the key in moving from ‘doing to’ to ‘doing with’. This can happen informally with individuals or in more formal settings, such as residents’ meetings or service user groups.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • When you have watched the SCIE video, write down some of the key terms relating to active participation in care.
  • Think about the organisation you work for. Are people participating in their care? Make a list of the things that mean they are involved and a list of what might be improved.

Did you know?

  • The more people are involved in their care, the more positive will be their experience.

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.

Supporting an individual’s right to make choices

Supporting people to make their own choices means making sure they have the right information about the different options and any consequences.

Some people who work in care may find this hard. They may feel that the person’s choices are dangerous or unwise. This links back to Standard 5 on the duty of care where we saw that there could be conflict.

Look at the following resources:

  • Letting a person make their own choices often involves taking risks. People have rights to take risks. Look again at this statement from the Department of Health (DH) quoted in Standard 5:

Supporting people to make informed choices – Most of the choices that people make in life naturally involve some element of risk, and the decisions made by people using health and social care are no different. Avoiding risks altogether would constrain their choices and opportunities. Risk is a concept that tends to have negative connotations but people take considered risks all of the time and gain many positive benefits. As new health and social care choices and opportunities arise, they are likely to involve the consideration of taking risks.

Check your understanding

  • What are the things that you can do to support people to make their own choices? What might you do to support people who have communication difficulties to make their own choices?
  • Write down an occasion when a person you support took a risk that you felt was unwise. How did you deal with it ?

Did you know?

  • Risk is part of every decision we make in our daily lives.

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.

Promoting spiritual and emotional wellbeing

Often we are concerned with physical care, but we need to understand that the people we care for and support have emotional and spiritual needs. This becomes clear as you form relationships with them as a result of your role. Even if you come into contact with a person and there is little or no response it is important to remember that during that person’s earlier life there will have been significant emotional and spiritual occasions.  

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • Look at the competencies in the Marie Curie document and make a list of the things you feel comfortable about. Make another list of anything you find difficult to understand and discuss this with your supervisor.

Did you know? 

  • Freedom to practise one’s religion is affirmed in Article 9 of the Human Rights Act (HRA).

Record what you have learned

  • Use the Learning Record Form to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have.