Induction Standards for Northern Ireland

Standard 6: Develop as a worker: Knowledge and skill development

This concerns being clear about the duties and responsibilities of your role and being aware of the standards you must practise to. It is important to consider how your personal attitudes, beliefs and experiences may affect the way you work. There is an agreed Codes of practice for social care workers. This will help you to understand your responsibilities as well as the professional boundaries that apply to your work.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • In Standard 2 you looked at your job description. Look at it again and think about what you need to know and learn to do all the tasks involved. Think about the demands of your job – its purpose, how the tasks listed relate to that purpose and, most importantly, what it means to do the job well. Ask yourself what knowledge, skills and attitudes are required. If in doubt, ask your supervisor.
  • Write a list of all the skills, knowledge and attitudes you have thought of as necessary for your job. Are you surprised at some of these?
  • How would you explain your job to someone who had no experience of care work

Did you know?

  • There are approximately 30,000 social care workers in Northern Ireland. They all need the same wide range of basic skills and knowledge.

Record what you have learned

  • Your organisation may have a Learning Record Form. If so, use that to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have. Otherwise you can use our Learning Record Form.

Evaluating your own performance

There are certain basic skills that care and support workers need. These are: literacy, numeracy and communication skills. The aim of this section is to make sure you understand the skills you need for your role. One way to do this is to carry out the checks on the SCIE Care Skillsbase and to record what you have done. For example, do you know how to fill in a care plan? SCIE Care Skillsbase: Skills Check 09: Care Plans deals with this.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • Why are these skills so important? Write a short paragraph to explain. If you find this difficult, talk to your supervisor.

Did you know?

  • Many adults have problems with literacy and numeracy. If you are one of them, remember that you are not alone.

Record what you have learned

  • Your organisation may have a Learning Record Form. If so, use that to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have. Otherwise you can use our Learning Record Form.

Producing a personal development plan

You will need support for your personal development. Supervision is one way of getting this, as is discussion with other experienced colleagues. Your personal development plan should show what you need to learn and how this is to be done. It needs to be reviewed frequently, both by yourself and with your supervisor. A typical outline for a plan may have headings like these:

Another way of developing your skills is by listening to constructive feedback from colleagues.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • Start your own personal development plan and share it with your supervisor.

Did you know?

  • People learn in different ways, so it is important that you are aware of the best methods for you.

Record what you have learned

  • Your organisation may have a Learning Record Form. If so, use that to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have. Otherwise you can use our Learning Record Form.

Using learning opportunities and reflective practice to contribute to personal development

It is important that you think about the learning activities you are involved in. Your organisation is likely to have a system for recording your learning. This enables inspectors to see that employees are meeting the right standards. It is also important for you to keep a record of what you have done so that you know what other areas you need to cover and when you need training to refresh your knowledge and skills.

Look at the following resources:

You will need carry out the learning activities in your plan and then evaluate the results. What new knowledge and skills have you gained? How has this improved the way you work?

Check your understanding

  • Think of a recent activity you engaged in with a person you support. Were you satisfied with their behaviour and your response? Why do you think they behaved in this way? What can you learn from this interaction (contact between you)?

Did you know?

  • Learning can be achieved in many different ways – reading, going on courses, e-learning, reflecting and talking to colleagues.

Record what you have learned

  • Your organisation may have a Learning Record Form. If so, use that to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have. Otherwise you can use our Learning Record Form.