Induction Standards for Northern Ireland

Standard 1: Understand the principles of care: Person-centred approaches

Person-centred support is about valuing and respecting the person who is being supported. As a way of thinking about this you could start by reflecting on the sort of care you would like to receive. Here are some comments from people who are being supported in health and social care.

I want the people who care for me to:

Most important of all, I want the people who care for me to:

If the people who care for me cannot look after me in the way I want, then I hope they will:

These comments can be found in SCIE’s Care Skillsbase, Skills check 01: Talking about the Principles of Care.

You will find the Care Skillsbase a useful resource as it covers 40 learning activities to develop your skills and knowledge.

Promote person-centred values in everyday work

Promoting person-centred values means carrying out your role in a way that respects the people you work with so that they can live the life that they choose to. This should not be any different from what you would want or expect should you need care and support. When you go about your day-to-day work you must always be aware of the individual person that you are providing the service for. You may see these values expressed in the following way: individuality, independence, privacy, partnership, choice, dignity, respect, rights, equality and diversity.

In the course of your work you may come across the term ‘self-directed support’ or ‘personalisation’. These terms mean enabling people to be more in control of the services they receive.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • Make a list of things which are important in person-centred care. Here is one – choice.
  • Why is person-centred care important?

Did you know?

  • Person-centred approach and personalisation share the same values and essentially try to achieve the same goal. Personalisation may be seen as the entire process whereas a person-centred approach is one of the ways of bringing about personalisation.

Record what you have learned

  • Your organisation may have a Learning Record Form. If so, use that to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have. Otherwise you can use our Learning Record Form.

Working in a person-centred way

Your role is to help people choose the way their care needs are met and also to help them plan for the longer term. People’s choices will be different depending on the types of tasks you are doing together and their abilities. If a person makes a decision that you feel is risky, discuss your concerns with them, and if possible support them to understand the risks.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • Think of someone you care for and support. Make a list of things that would help you and others care for and support them in a person-centred way.
  • What type of things would you expect to see in a person-centred plan?
  • Check whether the people you work with have a person-centred care plan. If they haven’t, ask your supervisor why not.

Did you know?

  • People have a right to be treated as individuals. Their care plan should reflect this.

Record what you have learned

  • Your organisation may have a Learning Record Form. If so, use that to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have. Otherwise you can use our Learning Record Form.

Promoting spiritual and emotional wellbeing

Often we are concerned with physical care, but we need to understand that the people we care for and support have emotional and spiritual needs. This becomes clear as you form relationships with them as a result of your role. Even if you come into contact with a person and there is little or no response it is important to remember that during that person’s earlier life there will have been significant emotional and spiritual occasions.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • Look at the competencies in the Marie Curie document and make a list of the things you feel comfortable about. Make another list of anything you find difficult to understand and discuss this with your supervisor.

Did you know?

  • Freedom to practise one’s religion is affirmed in Article 9 of the Human Rights Act (HRA).

Record what you have learned

  • Your organisation may have a Learning Record Form. If so, use that to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have. Otherwise you can use our Learning Record Form.