#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find resources by subject topic

Access to information resources and services

Results 1 - 10 of 21

The road ahead?: information for young people with learning difficulties, their families and supporters at transition

This report for the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) brings together the findings from three inter-linked investigations relating to the information needs of young people, their parents and supporters at transition. It was undertaken over a six month period between October 2003 and March 2004 and included: focus group interviews with young people, their parents and supporters; a systematic review of the literature on transition; and a review of the information already available for young people, parents and professionals, including an evaluation of materials by young people and parents. The project was carried out by the Norah Fry Research Centre (NFRC) in partnership with North Somerset People First (NSPF) and the Home Farm Trust (HFT).

Young carer transition in practice under the Care Act 2014

Part of Care Act 2014

This resource explores how the provisions in the Care Act around transition can be put into practice for young carers moving from children’s to adult services to ensure that they are appropriately supported and encouraged to fulfil their education and employment potential. One young carer’s journey through transition (Emma’s story) will provide an example of how several services worked together to support her into adulthood. The resource covers: transition in the Care Act 2014 and the Children and Families Act 2014; identifying support needs of young carers; timing of a transition assessment; transition assessments under the Care Act 2014; approaches to assessments; information and advice; transition planning; transition of young carers; practice examples, describing young carers’ journeys through transition; and a process map with suggestions on how to put the stages into action.

Dignity in care: privacy

Privacy is a major contributor to providing dignity in care. It can mean making sure that a confidentiality policy is in place; or making issues of privacy and dignity part of staff induction and training.

Safeguarding adults: lessons from the murder of Steven Hoskin

This film for adult social services, health, and police shows the story of Steven Hoskin, a man who was tortured and murdered by people who targeted him because of his learning disabilities. It demonstrates that partnership between agencies and procedures for sharing information are vital to adult safeguarding.

Managing knowledge to improve social care: a day in the life

Part of e-Learning courses

This interactive module is the first of nine modules that comprise the e-learning resource ‘Managing knowledge to improve social care’. It uses video and audio to explore how social care practitioners use knowledge in their day-to-day work lives, including: day-to-day contexts in which they encounter a need to use various sources of knowledge; different sources and features of knowledge that contribute to professional practice; constraints and uncertainties with regard to information and knowledge used on a daily basis; making an initial decision about how useful and how reliable different sources of knowledge are; and recognising that the usefulness of sources is determined by the context in which they are to be used. The estimated time to complete the module is 20-30 minutes. It includes three sections: 1. Introduction; 2. A day in the life (knowledge management in daily working life); 3. Conclusion (summary of the main points). The module concludes with a self-assessment exercise.

Managing knowledge to improve social care: using technology to improve knowledge sharing

Part of e-Learning courses

This interactive module is the sixth of nine modules comprising the e-learning resource ‘Managing knowledge to improve social care’. It uses video and audio to: describe a range of technologies that can support improved knowledge-sharing across the team; identify and demonstrate the most appropriate technology to support everyday tasks and activities; identify ways to make the technology work for the user and not the other way round. The estimated time to complete the module is 20-30 minutes. It includes four sections: 1. Introduction; 2. The technology landscape; 3. Choosing the right technology for the job; 4. Making the best use of technology. The module concludes with a self-assessment exercise.

Managing knowledge to improve social care: social care 2.0: innovation through technology

Part of e-Learning courses

This interactive module is the last of nine modules comprising the e-learning resource ‘Managing knowledge to improve social care’. It uses video and audio to explain: the term web 2.0 and its associated technologies including online social networking, micro-blogging (Twitter) and wikis; the evidence that web 2.0 tools can support user centred care; how web 2.0 tools can be used to support practice; how web 2.0 tools can be used to improve the health and experience of care service users. The estimated time to complete the module is 20-30 minutes. It comprises five sections: Introduction; Defining web 2.0; Web 2.0 in social care; Web 2.0 for you; and Conclusion, which provides a summary of main points. The module concludes with a self-assessment exercise.

Results 1 - 10 of 21

#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
View all our free e-learning resources
STUDY NOW
View all our free Social Care TV videos
WATCH NOW
CPD accredited training. Book an open course, or ask about tailored training
TRAINING
SCIE consultants can help you review, plan and deliver improvements
CONSULTANCY
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#