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Adults resources and services

Results 1 - 10 of 17

Innovative models of health, care and support for adults

This briefing explains that innovative, often small-scale models of health, social care and support for adults could be scaled up to benefit as many people as possible. The challenge is to make scaling up successful. The briefing is based on research conducted during the spring of 2017 by Nesta, SCIE, Shared Lives Plus and PPL. It includes real life stories.

Self-neglect policy and practice: research messages for practitioners

Part of Self-neglect

This briefing highlights key findings for practitioners from research which looked policies and practices that have produced positive outcomes in self-neglect work. The original research drew on a survey 53 local authorities and a series of in-depth interviews with 20 managers, 42 practitioners in adult social care and in safeguarding, and 29 people who use services. Findings from the interviews found that that there was no clear lifestyle patters which led to self-neglect. Factors that were seen as instrumental in supporting good outcomes in self-neglect work included: the importance of relationships; 'finding’ the person through understanding their life history; understanding of legal duties and powers; making use of creative interventions; and effective multi-agency working. The final section looks at the organisational infrastructure for self-neglect work. Key themes were: strong inter-agency strategic ownership; clear referral pathways; reliable data; a range of coherent mechanisms for turning strategic commitments into operational reality.

Self-neglect policy and practice: research messages for managers

Part of Self-neglect

This briefing highlights key findings for managers from research which looked policies and practices that have produced positive outcomes in self-neglect work. The original research drew on a survey 53 local authorities and a series of in-depth interviews with 20 managers, 42 practitioners in adult social care and in safeguarding, and 29 people who use services. It begins by defining self-neglect and then looks at specific aspects of strategy and governance, including the location of self-neglect within adult safeguarding, the commissioning of reviews, and the development of policies for self neglect. It then looks at operational aspects, focusing on building multi-agency cooperation, configuring effective referral pathways and supporting frontline practice through training and guidance. Four questions for managers to consider when reviewing their organisation's self-neglect policy and practice are also included. Self-neglect practice was found to be more successful where practitioners built good relationships; worked at the individuals pace; were honest about risks and options; made use of creative and flexible interventions; and engaged in effective multi-agency working. Organisational arrangements that best supported self-neglect work included: a clear location for strategic responsibility for self-neglect; a shared understanding between agencies; clear referral routes; training and development for staff working with adults who self-neglect.

Self-neglect policy and practice: key research messages

Part of Self-neglect

This briefing highlights key findings from research which looked at learning from policies and practices that have produced positive outcomes in self-neglect work. The original research drew on a survey 53 local authorities and a series of in-depth interviews with 20 managers, 42 practitioners in adult social care and in safeguarding, and 29 people who use services. The findings identify factors that make self-neglect services more effective and organisational arrangements that could best help self-neglect work. Interviews of people who use services, practitioners and managers looked at: causes of self-neglect, accepting help, the experience and impact of self-neglect. Five areas which were most frequently identified as making a positive difference to self-neglect in practice were: the importance of relationships, 'finding' the person, legal literacy, creative interventions and effective multi-agency working. It concludes that the heart of self-neglect practice is a balance of knowing the person; being, in showing personal and professional qualities of respect; and doing, in the sense of balancing hands-on and hands-off approaches. The briefing is intended for people who use services, carers, non-specialist workers and the general public.

Results 1 - 10 of 17

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