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  • A-Z subject topic: Select a letter (above) to see a list of social and health care subject topics. Choose your topic to produce a list of SCIE resources on that subject.
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    Results 601 - 610 of 1269

    Self-neglect policy and practice: research messages for practitioners

    Part of Self-neglect

    This briefing highlights key findings for practitioners from research which looked policies and practices that have produced positive outcomes in self-neglect work. The original research drew on a survey 53 local authorities and a series of in-depth interviews with 20 managers, 42 practitioners in adult social care and in safeguarding, and 29 people who use services. Findings from the interviews found that that there was no clear lifestyle patters which led to self-neglect. Factors that were seen as instrumental in supporting good outcomes in self-neglect work included: the importance of relationships; 'finding’ the person through understanding their life history; understanding of legal duties and powers; making use of creative interventions; and effective multi-agency working. The final section looks at the organisational infrastructure for self-neglect work. Key themes were: strong inter-agency strategic ownership; clear referral pathways; reliable data; a range of coherent mechanisms for turning strategic commitments into operational reality.

    Self-neglect policy and practice: research messages for managers

    Part of Self-neglect

    This briefing highlights key findings for managers from research which looked policies and practices that have produced positive outcomes in self-neglect work. The original research drew on a survey 53 local authorities and a series of in-depth interviews with 20 managers, 42 practitioners in adult social care and in safeguarding, and 29 people who use services. It begins by defining self-neglect and then looks at specific aspects of strategy and governance, including the location of self-neglect within adult safeguarding, the commissioning of reviews, and the development of policies for self neglect. It then looks at operational aspects, focusing on building multi-agency cooperation, configuring effective referral pathways and supporting frontline practice through training and guidance. Four questions for managers to consider when reviewing their organisation's self-neglect policy and practice are also included. Self-neglect practice was found to be more successful where practitioners built good relationships; worked at the individuals pace; were honest about risks and options; made use of creative and flexible interventions; and engaged in effective multi-agency working. Organisational arrangements that best supported self-neglect work included: a clear location for strategic responsibility for self-neglect; a shared understanding between agencies; clear referral routes; training and development for staff working with adults who self-neglect.

    Self-neglect policy and practice: key research messages

    Part of Self-neglect

    This briefing highlights key findings from research which looked at learning from policies and practices that have produced positive outcomes in self-neglect work. The original research drew on a survey 53 local authorities and a series of in-depth interviews with 20 managers, 42 practitioners in adult social care and in safeguarding, and 29 people who use services. The findings identify factors that make self-neglect services more effective and organisational arrangements that could best help self-neglect work. Interviews of people who use services, practitioners and managers looked at: causes of self-neglect, accepting help, the experience and impact of self-neglect. Five areas which were most frequently identified as making a positive difference to self-neglect in practice were: the importance of relationships, 'finding' the person, legal literacy, creative interventions and effective multi-agency working. It concludes that the heart of self-neglect practice is a balance of knowing the person; being, in showing personal and professional qualities of respect; and doing, in the sense of balancing hands-on and hands-off approaches. The briefing is intended for people who use services, carers, non-specialist workers and the general public.

    Adult safeguarding practice questions

    Part of Safeguarding adults in practice

    This resource uses a series of practice questions to identify a number of challenging safeguarding dilemmas. The questions and answers aim to provide guidance on how these dilemmas should be handled within the new legal framework of the Care Act 2014. It does not address strategic commissioning issues or discuss the role of Safeguarding Adults Boards (SABs). It is relevant for frontline practitioners and managers who work with adults who have care and support needs and who may be at risk of abuse or neglect. This includes people in health, housing, the police, as well as in social care, both statutory social workers, and staff in the regulated and non-regulated provider sectors. The guide is part of a range of products to support implementation of the adult safeguarding aspects of the Care Act 2014. The questions were originally published in 2015, and updated in July 2018.

    Transition from children's to adult services - early and comprehensive identification

    Part of Care Act 2014

    This resource explains how local authorities can ensure early and comprehensive identification of children, children’s carers and young carers where there is a likely need for care and support after the child in question turns 18 and a transition assessment would be of ‘significant benefit’. It also examines what some authorities are doing in practice and considers some of the principles behind that practice which align with the Care Act 2014, including: co-production and power-sharing; building good relationships with young people and their families; engaging with black and minority ethnic families; proactive early identification; integrated IT systems; and joined-up thinking. It looks at mental health transitions and transition from youth justice and includes a checklist for the identification of seldom heard groups. The Hampshire, Newham and Stoke-on-Trent practice examples set out in detail the approaches to identification and transition in three councils.

    Adult carer transition in practice under the Care Act 2014

    Part of Care Act 2014

    The resource explores how the provisions in the Care Act around transition can be put into practice for adult carers as the young person they care for moves into adulthood. This can be a difficult time for adult carers, because the young person they care for will often be leaving full-time education and require very different care and support as an adult building an independent life. Adult carers have in the past had to give up full-time work in order to provide more support. The Care Act places a duty on local authorities to assess adult carers before the child they care for turns 18, so that they have the information they need to plan for their future. This is referred to as a transition assessment. This resource brings together useful publications, practice examples and a process map with suggestions on how to put the stages into action.

    Young carer transition in practice under the Care Act 2014

    Part of Care Act 2014

    This resource explores how the provisions in the Care Act around transition can be put into practice for young carers moving from children’s to adult services to ensure that they are appropriately supported and encouraged to fulfil their education and employment potential. One young carer’s journey through transition (Emma’s story) will provide an example of how several services worked together to support her into adulthood. The resource covers: transition in the Care Act 2014 and the Children and Families Act 2014; identifying support needs of young carers; timing of a transition assessment; transition assessments under the Care Act 2014; approaches to assessments; information and advice; transition planning; transition of young carers; practice examples, describing young carers’ journeys through transition; and a process map with suggestions on how to put the stages into action.

    What does a good IMHA service look like?

    Part of Independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA)

    A self-assessment tool which enables IMHA providers to self-assess their service within a clear quality framework and help them understand what a good IMHA service looks like. The tool lists ten indicators with suggested evidence sources for self-assessment. The quality indicators covered are: values, independence, role clarity, co-production, relationships to other forms of advocacy provision, staffing, equality and diversity, accessibility of the service, relationship with mental health services, and monitoring and self-evaluation. A third column allows IMHA providers to rate themselves using red, amber and green traffic lights. Providers can then summarises their key strengths and areas for development.

    Results 601 - 610 of 1269

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