COVID-19 resources

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“Coming second all the time”: life in lockdown for siblings of disabled children

Sibs

Findings of a survey of 876 parents, exploring the experience of siblings of disabled children during lockdown and the Covid-19 pandemic. The study examines the impact of the lockdown on the mental health and wellbeing of siblings; the challenges in supporting your sibling children; the difficulties faced by sibling children during lockdown; whether the lockdown meant that siblings had to provide more care to their brothers or sisters. The analysis shows that 75% of respondents felt that their sibling child’s mental health had worsened in lockdown; 50% of siblings were providing more care; and 1 in 3 siblings are feeling isolated and missing the support of family and friends. The survey also asked what would have helped parents and siblings during lockdown. The solutions put forward include: respite; financial support; space; exercise equipment; entertainment and toys; outdoor play equipment; having a safe and accessible garden; iPads, computers and electronic games; recognition and rewards.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

“Spend time with me”: children and young people’s experiences of COVID-19 and the justice system

Centre for Youth & Criminal Justice

This paper shares findings from research gathering the views of children and young people with experience of the justice system on COVID-19 and associated restrictions. Youth justice practitioners were also consulted, and shared practice examples as case studies. The study shows that the biggest issues facing children and young people in the justice system are isolation and lack of contact with others. Boredom, lack of activity and being stuck at home were also reported to be significant issues in complying with restrictions. This is in spite of almost all children and young people reporting they have been able to stay in touch with family and friends, and practitioners developing creative methods to sustain contact, and continue to support children, young people and their families. Particular challenges were identified with the operation of the justice system across all areas of the Whole System Approach. Some existing challenges such as delays to processes and release from custody have been exacerbated by COVID-19. A range of factors have worked in supporting children and young people: keeping in touch through creative methods; ensuring access to things to keep them occupied, practical resources and technology; working with partners; and the dedication of staff. This evidence has been used to inform the Alternative Child Rights Impact Assessment about the coronavirus, commissioned by the Children and Young People’s Commissioner Scotland.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

10 leaps forward: innovation in the pandemic. What we want to keep from this experience: going ‘back to better’

London South Bank University

An analysis of the findings of an online survey asking leaders and clinicians to reflect and play back in their own words the most important transformations that have happened due to COVID-19. The findings show that in a very short time healthcare services have learned to operate as a highly performing system and made significant advances. These include: staff being properly valued and supported; using 21st century tools; working with connected, visible, engaged leaders; care basics and inefficiencies have been fixed and sorted; local health systems have joined up together to get things done; staff working together as real teams; staff have stepped up and acted with professionalism and autonomy. As a result, the healthcare system is now better placed to make decisions based on needs and think pro-actively; to make mutual decisions with patients as partners; and to work in close collaboration with its community.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

A COVID-19 guide for care staff supporting an adult with learning disabilities/autism

Social Care Institute for Excellence

A guide to help care staff and personal assistants supporting adults with learning disabilities and autistic adults through the COVID-19 crisis.

Last updated on hub: 17 April 2020

A COVID-19 guide for carers and family supporting an adult with learning disabilities/autism

Social Care Institute for Excellence

A guide to help family members and carers supporting adults and children with learning disabilities and autistic adults through the COVID-19 crisis.

Last updated on hub: 17 April 2020

A COVID-19 guide for social workers supporting an adult with learning disabilities/autism

Social Care Institute for Excellence

A guide to help social workers and occupational therapists supporting autistic adults and adults with learning disabilities through the COVID-19 crisis.

Last updated on hub: 17 April 2020

Accessing support : the role of the voluntary and community sector during COVID-19

Local Government Association

A briefing paper to provide councils and community and voluntary sector with information on the role and contribution of the community and voluntary sector and the use of volunteers in local and national responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. It includes links to resources, guidance and tools to support councils to work effectively with national and local vountary and community services and in the use of volunteers. The briefing was published on 2 June 2020.

Last updated on hub: 04 June 2020

Accommodation for perpetrators of domestic abuse: emerging issues and responses due to COVID-19

Drive Project

Isolation and social distancing during the COVID-19 lockdown have led and are likely to continue to lead to an increase in domestic abuse, violence and coercive control at all levels of risk. This paper argues that, where it would be in the best interests of the victim and better ensure their safety and wellbeing, adequate housing provision is urgently needed for perpetrators of domestic violence. The lack of availability of such accommodation is limiting options available to victims and police in their endeavour to keep victims safe.

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2020

Accounting for the variation in the confirmed Covid-19 caseload across England: an analysis of the role of multi-generation households, London and time

New Policy Institute

This paper develops a model to measure the size of the impact of various socio-economic variables on the confirmed Covid-19 caseload. The model shows a statistical link across local authority areas between the confirmed Covid-19 caseload and the proportion of households where pensioners and working-age live together, especially in areas of high deprivation. The paper then draws out the short- and long-term implications and policy questions raised by the model. These include the policy response to the coronavirus over the coming months, such as advice on social distancing; and current housing policy, especially the standards that determine what counts as adequate accommodation.

Last updated on hub: 05 May 2020

Activities delivered at home by family carers to maintain cognitive function in people with dementia socially isolating during COVID-19: evidence for non-technology based activities / interventions

Centre for Evidence Based Medicine

A rapid review to identify evidence for which non-technology based activities that can be delivered at home by family carers are effective in maintaining cognitive function in people with dementia who are socially isolating during COVID-19. These interventions can include reminiscence therapy, cognitive stimulation therapy, music-based interventions, art therapy or meaningful activities. The review found very few studies where family carers were trained or supported to deliver an intervention within the home environment. However, it identified a small body of evidence to suggest that activities delivered at home by family carers may have some positive effects on cognition and mood. The evidence suggests that engaging people with dementia in activities that they find enjoyable or those that link to past work/hobbies can be helpful in giving a sense of purpose and meaning during a time of isolation. Non-technology based interventions may have some practical advantages for those currently isolating at home since they are inexpensive and do not require extensive training.

Last updated on hub: 01 June 2020