COVID-19 resources

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4 reasons housing providers must revise their telecare needs post COVID-19

Appello

This guide highlights the changing landscape for the delivery of technology enabled care services (TECS). It draws on findings from interviews and independent research undertaken with the Housing Learning and Improvement Network (LIN) of 120 senior executives from providers of supported, sheltered and retirement housing. The analysis indicates that 85% housing providers report their perceptions on the use of technology have changed as a result of COVID-19 while 74% feel that their requirements for telecare and wellbeing technologies have changed as a result of the pandemic. The document sets out four key reasons that support the strengthening and consolidation of the telecare offer within housing settings and makes recommendations on how to achieve this. The four reasons are: vulnerable communities need support to maintain their social connections – there is huge potential for housing providers to harness communication technologies to help connect older people and promote digital inclusion; remote working will be here to stay – 80% of housing providers believe video communication between residents and staff is becoming more important to their organisation because of COVID-19; how we access healthcare services will change – for instance, it is likely that the pandemic will be the catalyst for greater use of video appointments within the health sector; more services are being accessed online – in an uncertain world, with shielding and social distancing it is becoming even more vital to help older and vulnerable people to access support, and services from paying bills online to accessing pensions and shopping from home while keeping safe.

Last updated on hub: 04 August 2020

MCR pathways lockdown survey: how to build back better: listening to the voices of our young people

MCR Pathways

Findings of a survey of 1,347 care-experienced and disadvantaged young people (aged 13 -18) from across Scotland, gaining insight into their experience of the COVID-19 lockdown, specifically in relation to mental wellbeing, home learning, and impact on career plans and future expectations. Key findings on the impacts of the lockdown include: impact on mental wellbeing – two thirds (66.8%) of young people are feeling low, more anxious and stressed since lockdown and 88.8% said their sleeping patterns have changed and over a quarter (26.5%) said they were experiencing significantly disrupted sleep; impact on education and return to school – since lockdown, 68.2% did not use any learning materials provided by the school while, significantly, over a quarter had caring duties that impacted on their capacity for home learning; impact on the future – 64.8% of young people say that COVID-19 has not changed their future plans for what they want to do when they leave school and 38.5% of leavers are feeling confident about their next steps. The report makes a number of recommendations, including ensuring education is provided on a full-time basis, schools offer a recovery curriculum, and disadvantaged young people are systematically and comprehensively consulted as a matter of course throughout the formation of all recovery and rebuild plans.

Last updated on hub: 04 August 2020

National food strategy: part one

National Food Strategy

Part one of the two-part National Food Strategy contains urgent recommendations to enable the food system to cope with the turbulence caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, and to prepare for the end of the EU exit transition period on 31 December 2020. The report and recommendations cover two main themes: making sure the most disadvantaged children do not get left behind, ensuring all children get the nutrition they need; and grasping the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to decide what kind of trading nation the UK want to be. The report calls on the Government to move quickly to shore up the diets of the most deprived children using existing, proven mechanisms, expanding eligibility for the Free School Meal scheme, extending the Holiday Activity and Food Programme, increasing the value of Healthy Start vouchers to £4.25 per week, and extending the work of the Food to the Vulnerable Ministerial Task Force for a further 12 months up until July 2021.

Last updated on hub: 04 August 2020

Adult social care: seven principles for reform

Local Government Association

Sets out seven principles that should underpin social care and support reform in light of COVID-19. Taken together, these principles and their accompanying asks of Government are intended to chart a way forward for ensuring the very best local care and support in the future, so that people can live their very best life. The principles, which are endorsed by thirty-two leading organisations, are: people first and the value of social care; the importance of ‘local’; funding for a person-centred and preventative model of social care, which promotes resilience in local public services and communities; a new deal for the care workforce; a commissioning model that creates more person-centred services that help prevent, delay or reduce the need for more formal care services; securing greater parity of esteem between health and social care; and ensuring the scope of and ambition for social care reform encompass support for adults of all ages including unpaid carers, and a commitment to the Care Act wellbeing principle and to improving people’s choice and control of the care and support they use to live their best life.

Last updated on hub: 04 August 2020

COVID-19 Insight: issue 3

Care Quality Commission

Explores the need for providers and other organisations to collaborate to tackle COVID-19. The briefing focuses on better care through collaboration, looking at the importance of collaboration among providers, views on shared local vision for services, the importance of shared governance, and the challenge of ensuring enough staffing capacity; responding to feedback about care services, looking at the issues that have prompted CQC to inspect a number of services and the campaign ‘Because we all care’; financial viability and stability in the adult social care sector; the impact of COVID-19 on the use of Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards; and protecting people's rights under the Mental Health Act.

Last updated on hub: 04 August 2020

Five key insights on COVID-19 and adult social care

The Health Foundation

Summarises key messages emerging from recent reports on COVID-19 and adult social care. The messages include: the impact of COVID-19 on social care has been devastating; there are multiple possible reasons for outbreaks in care homes; access to hospital and social care were reduced; central government support for social care was too slow and too narrow; the pandemic played out against a backdrop of political neglect.

Last updated on hub: 04 August 2020

Personal assistants returning from shielding

Mark Bates Ltd

Fact sheet offering support to people who employ personal assistants with regards to their employee returning to work, following the lifting of shielding measures by the Government.

Last updated on hub: 04 August 2020

Adult social care and COVID-19: assessing the impact on social care users and staff in England so far

The Health Foundation

An overview of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on social care in England, describing how the pandemic unfolded in the social care sector from March until June 2020, and examining the factors that contributed to the scale and severity of outbreaks in care homes. The briefing also attempts to quantify the disruption to health and social care access from February until the end of April 2020. The findings demonstrate that the pandemic has had a profound impact on people receiving and providing social care in England – since March, there have been more than 30,500 deaths among care home residents than it would be normally expected, and a further 4,500 excess deaths among people receiving care in their own homes (domiciliary care); and while deaths in care homes have now returned to average levels for this time of year, the latest data (up until 19 June) shows that there have continued to be excess deaths reported among domiciliary care users. Social care workers are among the occupational groups at highest risk of COVID-19 mortality, with care home workers and home carers accounting for the highest proportion (76%) of COVID-19 deaths within this group. The analysis also shows that there was a substantial reduction in hospital admissions among care home residents which may have helped reduce the risk of transmission but potentially increased unmet health needs. The briefing argues that long-standing structural issues have exacerbated the crisis in social care and hindered the response to the pandemic. It suggests that action is needed now to prevent further harm including by filling the gaps in data, particularly for those receiving domiciliary care, and by developing a new data strategy for social care.

Last updated on hub: 03 August 2020

Adult social care and COVID-19: assessing the policy response in England so far

The Health Foundation

An analysis of national government policies on adult social care in England related to COVID-19 between 31 January and 31 May 2020. This briefing considers the role that social care has played in the overall policy narrative and identifies the underlying factors within the social care system, such as its structure and funding, that have shaped its ability to respond. It suggests that overall, central government support for social care came too late – some initial policies targeted the social care sector in March but the government's COVID-19: adult social care action plan was not published until 15 April and another month passed before the government introduced a dedicated fund to support infection control in care homes. Protecting and strengthening social care services, and stuff, appears to have been given far lower priority by national policymakers than protecting the NHS and policy action on social care has been focused primarily on care homes and risks leaving out other vulnerable groups and services. The briefing calls on the Government to learn from the first phase of the COVID-19 response to prepare for potential future waves of the virus. Short-term actions should include greater involvement of social care in planning and decision making, improved access to regular testing and PPE, and a commitment to cover the costs of local government’s COVID-19 response. Critically, more fundamental reform of the social care system is needed to address the longstanding policy failures exacerbated by COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 03 August 2020

Life on hold: children’s well-being and COVID-19

The Children's Society

The report combines findings from the Children’s Society’s annual household survey conducted in April-June 2020 with over 2,000 young people aged 10-17, and a consultation with 150 children, seeking more in-depth information on the impact of Coronavirus and the associated lockdown on their lives. Parents report a wide range of impacts on their family, and on their children’s happiness with friends and how much choice they have in life and anticipate long term negative impacts on their children’s education. Encouragingly, given the range of impacts reported, only around half expect a long-term negative impact on the happiness of adults / children in the household. Most children reported having coped to some degree with the changes made as a result of the pandemic but felt the impact of not being able to see their friends and family and felt isolated. While most children are happy / satisfied, a greater proportion than usual scored below the midpoint on the preferred, and usually stable, multi-item measure of life satisfaction, which suggests that some children’s cognitive wellbeing has been adversely affected. Parents felt that some children were happier with their time use than before lockdown and children responding to the consultation also highlighted advantages, such as being able to pursue hobbies, and appreciating more what they have in life. The self-care strategies described by children are reminiscent of the Five Ways to Wellbeing, with their main focus being on connecting with others followed by being active and creative.

Last updated on hub: 03 August 2020