COVID-19 resources

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"Don't ever call us unskilled again!'': learning from the experience of support workers during Covid-19

Paradigm

This report is based on responses from the Gr8 Support Covid-19 snapshot survey which invited support workers across the country to capture their experiences, thoughts, ideas and learning during the pandemic and share these with the nation. The report captures how support workers responded during the pandemic with thoughtfulness, creativity and dedication; some key messages and 'must haves' for moving forward beyond the pandemic; the plea of support workers to be valued and recognised as essential and highly skilled members of the social care workforce, not just now but as society moves forward. Key messages in responding to the pandemic emerging from this study include: supported living settings need clear, timely guidance; coronavirus tests must be available in supported living settings; support each person out of lockdown in the way that is right for them; recognise and support the essential role of support workers at this time; recognise and support the role of families and unpaid carers; society needs to act responsibly as lockdown eases; keep building on the community spirit; and get ready for a possible second wave. More broadly, the report calls for valuing and investing in social care; supporting people to regain and experience flourishing lives; increase the pay of support workers to reflect their highly skilled, complex and diverse roles; and ensure the profile of support workers is understood and valued.

Last updated on hub: 23 September 2020

“Coming second all the time”: life in lockdown for siblings of disabled children

Sibs

Findings of a survey of 876 parents, exploring the experience of siblings of disabled children during lockdown and the Covid-19 pandemic. The study examines the impact of the lockdown on the mental health and wellbeing of siblings; the challenges in supporting your sibling children; the difficulties faced by sibling children during lockdown; whether the lockdown meant that siblings had to provide more care to their brothers or sisters. The analysis shows that 75% of respondents felt that their sibling child’s mental health had worsened in lockdown; 50% of siblings were providing more care; and 1 in 3 siblings are feeling isolated and missing the support of family and friends. The survey also asked what would have helped parents and siblings during lockdown. The solutions put forward include: respite; financial support; space; exercise equipment; entertainment and toys; outdoor play equipment; having a safe and accessible garden; iPads, computers and electronic games; recognition and rewards.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

“Spend time with me”: children and young people’s experiences of COVID-19 and the justice system

Centre for Youth & Criminal Justice

This paper shares findings from research gathering the views of children and young people with experience of the justice system on COVID-19 and associated restrictions. Youth justice practitioners were also consulted, and shared practice examples as case studies. The study shows that the biggest issues facing children and young people in the justice system are isolation and lack of contact with others. Boredom, lack of activity and being stuck at home were also reported to be significant issues in complying with restrictions. This is in spite of almost all children and young people reporting they have been able to stay in touch with family and friends, and practitioners developing creative methods to sustain contact, and continue to support children, young people and their families. Particular challenges were identified with the operation of the justice system across all areas of the Whole System Approach. Some existing challenges such as delays to processes and release from custody have been exacerbated by COVID-19. A range of factors have worked in supporting children and young people: keeping in touch through creative methods; ensuring access to things to keep them occupied, practical resources and technology; working with partners; and the dedication of staff. This evidence has been used to inform the Alternative Child Rights Impact Assessment about the coronavirus, commissioned by the Children and Young People’s Commissioner Scotland.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

10 leaps forward: innovation in the pandemic. What we want to keep from this experience: going ‘back to better’

London South Bank University

An analysis of the findings of an online survey asking leaders and clinicians to reflect and play back in their own words the most important transformations that have happened due to COVID-19. The findings show that in a very short time healthcare services have learned to operate as a highly performing system and made significant advances. These include: staff being properly valued and supported; using 21st century tools; working with connected, visible, engaged leaders; care basics and inefficiencies have been fixed and sorted; local health systems have joined up together to get things done; staff working together as real teams; staff have stepped up and acted with professionalism and autonomy. As a result, the healthcare system is now better placed to make decisions based on needs and think pro-actively; to make mutual decisions with patients as partners; and to work in close collaboration with its community.

Last updated on hub: 16 June 2020

4 reasons housing providers must revise their telecare needs post COVID-19

Appello

This guide highlights the changing landscape for the delivery of technology enabled care services (TECS). It draws on findings from interviews and independent research undertaken with the Housing Learning and Improvement Network (LIN) of 120 senior executives from providers of supported, sheltered and retirement housing. The analysis indicates that 85% housing providers report their perceptions on the use of technology have changed as a result of COVID-19 while 74% feel that their requirements for telecare and wellbeing technologies have changed as a result of the pandemic. The document sets out four key reasons that support the strengthening and consolidation of the telecare offer within housing settings and makes recommendations on how to achieve this. The four reasons are: vulnerable communities need support to maintain their social connections – there is huge potential for housing providers to harness communication technologies to help connect older people and promote digital inclusion; remote working will be here to stay – 80% of housing providers believe video communication between residents and staff is becoming more important to their organisation because of COVID-19; how we access healthcare services will change – for instance, it is likely that the pandemic will be the catalyst for greater use of video appointments within the health sector; more services are being accessed online – in an uncertain world, with shielding and social distancing it is becoming even more vital to help older and vulnerable people to access support, and services from paying bills online to accessing pensions and shopping from home while keeping safe.

Last updated on hub: 04 August 2020

A COVID-19 guide for care staff supporting an adult with learning disabilities/autism

Social Care Institute for Excellence

A guide to help care staff and personal assistants supporting adults with learning disabilities and autistic adults through the COVID-19 crisis.

Last updated on hub: 17 April 2020

A COVID-19 guide for carers and family supporting an adult with learning disabilities/autism

Social Care Institute for Excellence

A guide to help family members and carers supporting adults and children with learning disabilities and autistic adults through the COVID-19 crisis.

Last updated on hub: 17 April 2020

A COVID-19 guide for social workers supporting an adult with learning disabilities/autism

Social Care Institute for Excellence

A guide to help social workers and occupational therapists supporting autistic adults and adults with learning disabilities through the COVID-19 crisis.

Last updated on hub: 17 April 2020

A minimum income standard for the United Kingdom in 2020

Joseph Rowntree Foundation

This update of the Minimum Income Standard (MIS) presents new research in which parents identified what families with children need now to meet material needs and participate in society. It shows that in order to reach a minimum socially acceptable living standard in 2020, a single person needs to earn £19,200 a year, and a couple with two children each need to earn £18,700. The report considers how temporary increases in Universal Credit and tax credits in response to COVID-19 are helping low-income families. The results show the extent to which these increases, combined with a higher National Living Wage, can help these households move closer to a minimum, providing them with opportunities to build a better life. The report finds that for working families, the results are encouraging; for those out of work, they represent an improvement for some families, but even those who benefit must still live with well below what members of the public consider an acceptable minimum. It concludes by arguing that while the COVID-19 crisis has had damaging effects on the incomes and well-being of many households, it has also led the Government to introduce a system for helping people hit by low income at a more adequate level than previously. This demonstration of what more adequate support looks like sets an example for the future, creating a case for not returning to the previous levels.

Last updated on hub: 15 July 2020

A perfect storm: the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on domestic abuse survivors and the services supporting them

Women’s Aid

This report presents findings from the first phase of a research project exploring the impact of Covid-19 on experiences of domestic abuse for adult and child survivors and the specialist domestic services supporting them. It draws on the analysis of data from existing service directories, a thematic analysis of trends, and initial and follow-up surveys of providers and survivors. Findings suggest that whilst the Covid-19 pandemic did not cause domestic abuse, it created a perfect storm of challenges for survivors and the services supporting them. The lockdown measures gave perpetrators a tool that they quickly learnt to use for coercion, manipulation and to induce fear. This in turn exposed survivors to worsening domestic abuse, whilst restricting their access to support. At the same time, the pandemic created challenges for the specialist domestic abuse support sector in providing life-saving support, including lost income, staff shortages and additional costs of remote working. The report argues that to address this perfect storm domestic abuse must be seen as a priority at the highest level within all work across government; businesses and communities need to play a critical role in raising awareness of abuse and signposting survivors to specialist support; the government must create a long-term sustainable funding solution for all support services; and the government must address the recommendations outlined by sector experts looking at the impact of Covid-19 on the experiences of Black and minoritised women, migrant women, Deaf and disabled women and other marginalised groups.

Last updated on hub: 20 August 2020