COVID-19 resources

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Reducing SARS‐CoV‐2 transmission in the UK: a behavioural science approach to identifying options for increasing adherence to social distancing and shielding vulnerable people

British Journal of Health Psychology

Purpose: To describe and discuss a systematic method for producing a very rapid response (3 days) to a UK government policy question in the context of reducing SARS‐CoV‐2 transmission. Methods: A group of behavioural and social scientists advising the UK government on COVID‐19 contributed to the analysis and writing of advice through the Government Office for Science. The question was as follows: What are the options for increasing adherence to social distancing (staying at home except for essential journeys and work) and shielding vulnerable people (keeping them at home and away from others)? This was prior to social distancing legislation being implemented. The first two authors produced a draft, based on analysis of the current government guidance and the application of the Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW) framework to identify and evaluate the options. Results: For promoting social distancing, 10 options were identified for improving adherence. They covered improvements in ways of achieving the BCW intervention types of education, persuasion, incentivization, and coercion. For promoting shielding of vulnerable people, four options were identified covering the BCW intervention types of incentivization, coercion, and enablement. Conclusions: Responding to policymakers very rapidly as has been necessary during the COVID‐19 pandemic can be facilitated by using a framework to structure the thinking and reporting of multidisciplinary academics and policymakers.

Last updated on hub: 07 November 2020

Reducing social worker burnout during COVID-19

International Social Work

Burnout has become part of everyday vocabulary. During the time of COVID-19, burnout is no longer exclusively associated with job-related stress. Our current climate is entrenched with unprecedented levels of varying societal stressors. Particularly during this time, social workers should prioritize their own mental health. This is necessary in order to have continued success when working with others. This article proposes interventions for social workers to implement in order to combat burnout during the time of COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

Reducing the impact of Coronavirus on Poverty in Wales

A snapshot of the impact of Covid-19 on poverty in Wales up to the end of August. On the eve of the pandemic 700,000 people, nearly a quarter of the population, were already living in poverty. The pandemic has hit many of these families hard and swept others who were surviving just above the poverty threshold into poverty. The report draws on official data published by both the Welsh and UK Governments, alongside quantitative and qualitative data gathered from a range of stakeholders who are working with people in poverty. To complement this research a virtual roundtable was held with 14 people who have either been directly working on the front line in response to Covid-19 or who represent people and organisations undertaking such work. The report highlights some of the risk factors around work, social security and living costs that urgently need addressing to reduce the tightening grip of poverty. It identifies actions that the Welsh Government and Welsh local authorities should take immediately to help lift people out of poverty, rather than focusing on longer term solutions that should shape wider efforts to rebuild the economy and society.

Last updated on hub: 22 October 2020

Reflections on practice during a pandemic: how do we continue to ensure effective communication during the COVID‐19 pandemic?

Child Abuse Review

Personal reflection of a social worker who began a role in the Effective Child Protection Project as a practice mentor to social workers across the Children and Families Service in Gwynedd, in April 2019. This report considers the authors reflections on how communication has been affected in social work due to the pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 15 January 2021

Reflections on social work 2020 under Covid-19 online magazine

Social Work Education (The International Journal)

Social Work 2020 under Covid-19 was a free online magazine conceived just before the UK’s Covid-19 full lockdown began, in late March 2020. It ran for five editions until 14 July 2020. In this time it published close to 100 articles from academics, people with lived experience, practitioners and students. It contained a far higher proportion of submissions from the last three groups of contributors than traditional journals. This article draws on the six-person editorial collective’s reflections on the magazine: it considers its founding purposes; its role in fostering social work community, utilizing an adaptation of social capital classifications; and its potential as a learning tool. It concludes by arguing that the magazine illustrates the potential for free online publications to be an important emergent vehicle for ‘everyday activism’ within the field of social work.

Last updated on hub: 12 November 2020

Reflections on social work 2020 under Covid-19 online magazine

Social Work Education (The International Journal)

Social Work 2020 under Covid-19 was a free online magazine conceived just before the UK’s Covid-19 full lockdown began, in late March 2020. It ran for five editions until 14 July 2020. In this time it published close to 100 articles from academics, people with lived experience, practitioners and students. It contained a far higher proportion of submissions from the last three groups of contributors than traditional journals. This article draws on the six-person editorial collective’s reflections on the magazine: it considers its founding purposes; its role in fostering social work community, utilizing an adaptation of social capital classifications; and its potential as a learning tool. It concludes by arguing that the magazine illustrates the potential for free online publications to be an important emergent vehicle for ‘everyday activism’ within the field of social work.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

Reimagining the future of health and social care: how to learn the lessons from the Covid-19 crisis for a next generation health and care system

Royal Society of Arts

This report considers how the lessons from the Covid-19 crisis can help inform and shape the transformation of the health and social care system in England. The pandemic has acted as a real-time experiment of the capacity of the health and care system, highlighting the need for: greater connection between health and social care systems, social care on an equal footing with health care, agile and adaptive leadership, clear public health messaging, greater professional autonomy, addressing health inequality, digital access and literacy, flexible access to resources, including local and community assets, and effective deployment of new technology and data insights to support efficient responses. The paper explores three feasible scenarios for change: pandemic NHS – all health and social care activities are pivoted to ensure that as and when another pandemic hits, the NHS can respond effectively and efficiently; system stasis – returning the health and social care system to normal is the critical activity; and care horizons – a greater period of reflection and review of what happened during the pandemic leads to far greater integration between health and social care. The report explores how to take the best elements from these very different scenarios and recommends both immediate actions to build on the successes in responding to the pandemic and a national process of deliberative engagement with embedded consent amongst professionals, people with lived experience and the public more widely as a foundation for a new health and care settlement for England.

Last updated on hub: 13 July 2020

Relational lockdown and relational trauma in the time of coronavirus: a reflection from a UK family therapist

Family Process

Like a meteor hitting the earth’s surface, 44, 131 unexpected deaths have shaken, disturbed, and saddened the core of our nation. This reflection considers the consequences of the coronavirus crisis in the UK with particular reference to the impact on families and on the practice of family therapists. The perspective presented can only be partial because of the fast‐changing situation and the limited access to alternative perspectives that are available during this period of relational lockdown. The author provides a systemic understanding of what has happened and what is happening.

Last updated on hub: 14 October 2020

Relationships and resilience in the time of the Coronavirus

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

The Why Not? Trust for Care Experienced Young People is a charity set up in 2018, to support long term connections and relationships between young people with care experience and the people who matter to them. As well as individual connections, the Why Not? Trust is supporting young people, including young parents with care experience to develop their own community networks. These networks allow young people to access experiences and events which give opportunities they may not be able to access on their own. Their approach is based on a belief in being defined by relationships. The COVID-19 lockdown presented a challenge to relational engagements which are contingent upon being able to interact. Despite their fears they have managed to cope. The online world provided a way of maintaining contact and providing support with young care experienced adults. The experiences of the past few months helped the Trust better understand the causes of isolation and exclusion, but also to appreciate more than ever the value of human relationships.

Last updated on hub: 27 November 2020

Relationships and resilience in the time of the Coronavirus

Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care

Coming together as a community is an important function for members of The Why Not? Trust, a charity which supports long term connections and relationships between young people with care experience and the people who matter to them. These networks allow young people to access experiences and events which give opportunities they may not be able to access on their own. Their approach is based on a belief in being defined by relationships. The COVID-19 lockdown presented a challenge to relational engagements which are contingent upon being able to interact. Despite their fears they have managed to cope. The online world provided a way of maintaining contact and providing support with young care experienced adults. The experiences of the past few months helped the Trust better understand the causes of isolation and exclusion, but also to appreciate more than ever the value of human relationships.

Last updated on hub: 06 October 2020