COVID-19 resources

Results 1081 - 1090 of 1420

Social assistance institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic: experiences of Polish social workers

International Social Work

This article aims to present the results of a quantitative study (which used the Computer-Assisted Web Interview [CAWI] technique) conducted among social workers from social assistance institutions in the Wielkopolska region – the second-largest first-level administrative unit in Poland in terms of area. The aim of the research was to diagnose and describe the main changes in the functioning of institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic in Poland.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

Social care 360

King's Fund

Updated with 2018/19 data, this review of the adult social care outlines the state of the sector before the Covid-19 (coronavirus) pandemic struck. It outlines and analyses 20 key trends in adult social care in England. The review is structured into six sections covering: access to services - who is accessing services and how this has changed over time; expenditure - how much is spent on social care and what's it costing councils; providers - numbers of nursing and residential home places; workforce and carers; quality and satisfaction ratings for adult social care; and how well social care is integrated with other services. It shows that the social care sector had been fragile for several years and that the unprecedented challenges for the sector in responding to Covid-19 started from this unsteady foundation.

Last updated on hub: 11 May 2020

Social care provider resilience during COVID-19: guidance to commissioners

Local Government Association

Shared guidance from the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS), the Local Government Association (LGA) and the Care Provider Alliance (CPA) for local authority commissioners. The guidance summarises the pressures on social care providers arising from the coronavirus (COVID-19), and puts forward ways in which commissioners can alleviate these pressures. It aims to ensure that providers are supported to maximise availability of care and support and to remain operationally and financially resilient. Areas covered include: continuity planning, sick pay, workforce availability, rapid adjustment of support, supporting self-funders and use of non-contracted providers. The guidance does not deal with issues of infection control.

Last updated on hub: 17 March 2020

Social Care Sector COVID-19 Support Taskforce: BAME Communities Advisory: report and recommendations

Department of Health and Social Care

This is the report of the BAME Communities Advisory Group (AG), established to make recommendations to feed into the work of the Social Care Sector COVID -19 Support Taskforce. It includes a summary literature review and selections of findings from consultations that the AG has drawn upon to make its recommendations. Part 2, is an appendix, containing the other material that informed the work of the AG. The methodology for developing the recommendations in this report comprised: a rapid literature review (UK Civil Service, 2014) to scope overall thematic issues and appraise existing research on the employment experiences of BAME professionals; an online survey of BAME professionals and service users and carers; two virtual consultations on Zoom of BAME service users and carers and professionals, using the focus group method; and key informant interviews of leaders of social care organisations and faith groups. The report make ten recommendations, including that that people with lived experience should be at the forefront of developing social care policy and guidance that affects BAME communities; and that there should be parity between staff working in the NHS and social care in research, the design, development and delivery of programmes that support BAME staff through this and future pandemics

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Social Care Sector COVID-19 Support Taskforce: final report, advice and recommendations

Department of Health and Social Care

Final report and recommendations of the Social Care Sector COVID-19 Support Taskforce. Eight advisory groups were established to explore specific areas of care, namely: black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities; carers; good practice, guidance and innovation; mental health and wellbeing; older people and people living with dementia; people with learning disabilities and autistic people; self-directed support; and workforce’ The report sets out the progress and learning from the first phase of the COVID-19 pandemic in informing advice and recommendations to government and the social care sector. The report also sets out the action that will need be taken to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19 in the sector, both for those who rely on care and support, and the social care workforce. It details how people can be enabled to live as safely as possible while maintaining contacts and activity that enhance the health and wellbeing of service users and family carers. The report and recommendations cover the key themes in the management of COVID-19 and social care, including personal protective equipment (PPE), testing, flu vaccine, workforce and carers, training, funding, evidence and guidance, communication, clinical support, movement of people between care and health settings, inspection and regulation, capacity, expertise and information, use of data and digital, and national, regional and local structures. In addition, the report looks at the Care Home Support Plan; the Adult Social Care Action Plan; managing community outbreaks and the response of social care; key themes emerging from the taskforce advisory groups; and planning for the next phase of the pandemic

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Social Care Sector Covid-19 Support Taskforce: Guidance, Good Practice and Innovation Advisory Group: final report on recommendations

Department of Health and Social Care

This is the report of the Guidance, Good Practice and Innovation Advisory Group, established to make recommendations to feed into the work of the Social Care Sector COVID -19 Support Taskforce. The recommendations cover: guidance – social care responsibilities in local outbreaks of COVID 19, accessibility and accuracy of social care guidance, guidance coproduction and stakeholder groups, discharge from hospital to care settings, visiting friends and carers, use of guidance, use of PPE; good practice – COVID 19 commissioning guidance, accessing on-line resources, mutual aid and volunteering, primary care support, support for homeless people, maintaining wellbeing; and innovation – Social Care Innovation Network, scale and embed technology-enabled care models, global innovation, self-funders and unpaid carers.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Social Care Sector: Covid-19 Support Taskforce: full recommendations - including all Advisory Group recommendations

Department of Health and Social Care

This document presents the full recommendations of the Social Care Sector COVID-19 Support Taskforce and the eight advisory groups. In response to COVID-19, the taskforce was commissioned, beginning its work on 15 June 2020 and completing its work at the end of August 2020, to provide advice and recommendations to government and the social care sector. Eight advisory groups were established to explore specific areas of care, namely: black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities; carers; good practice, guidance and innovation; mental health and wellbeing; older people and people living with dementia; people with learning disabilities and autistic people; self-directed support; and workforce. In addition to the specific themes of the advisory groups, the recommendations cover the key themes in the overall management of COVID-19 and social care, including personal protective equipment (PPE), testing, flu vaccine, workforce and carers, training, funding, evidence and guidance, communication, clinical support, movement of people between care and health settings, inspection and regulation, capacity, expertise and information, use of data and digital, and national, regional and local structures; the Care Home Support Plan; the Adult Social Care Action Plan; managing community outbreaks and the response of social care; key themes emerging from the taskforce advisory groups; and planning for the next phase of the pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Social Care Taskforce: Workforce Advisory Group: report and recommendations

Department of Health and Social Care

This is the report of the Workforce Advisory Group, established to make recommendations to feed into the work of the Social Care Sector COVID -19 Support Taskforce. Two consistent themes have run throughout the work of the Advisory Group: the low priority given to planning and resource allocation for the workforce who support individual employers; and the importance of coherent and timely guidance which meets the needs of the workforce and their employers in their respective environments. The recommendations have been grouped as “top priority”, “highly important” and “important”. The top priorities cover: pay and recognition of the workforce; maintain the safety and wellbeing of our workforce; fully-fund measures to minimise staff movement and self-isolation; supporting workers’ mental and physical health; and maximise uptake of seasonal influenza vaccination.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

Social care: coronavirus – can the catastrophe be a catalyst?: care report 2020

Just

The Care Report 2020 sheds light on how the over-45s think and feel about adult social care, planning for future needs and costs of care and the implications of COVID-19. The report indicates that there is a widespread view among over-45s that the lack of progress on social care policy by successive governments has had an impact on how the social care sector and NHS have been able to respond to Covid-19. More than half said they thought it had made it harder for the care services to respond to the threat. Just around one in five thinks the government will put into practice a social care policy in this Parliament. A constant theme of the research findings is that there is broad agreement on what constitutes fairness in paying for care regardless of political affiliation. Across the political spectrum, most agree that if someone is unable to pay for care then the State should pay. Similar proportions say they think the State should pay for all care, regardless of how they voted at the 2019 General Election. There is no great difference in voter support for those who do and don’t back a cap on care costs. Critically, nearly four in five of over-45s said they had not thought about care, planned for it or spoken to family about it, further highlighting the urgency for a government policy. The report concludes by noting that worries about lack of progress towards a social care policy and a workable solution appear to outweigh concerns about the finer points of that solution.

Last updated on hub: 02 July 2020

Social care: time to grasp the nettle

NHS Confederation

This report, part of the NHS Reset campaign, explores the opportunities and challenges ahead for health and social care. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the critical role that social care plays in the delivery of health and care services. But it has also exacerbated the underlying weaknesses in social care and demonstrated the need for fundamental reform. The report argues that four critical factors are needed to reset social care: a stable, well-funded social care service – without social care reform leading to a sustainable system the NHS will not be able to deliver high-quality care in the wake of the pandemic; a long-term plan for social care to address the imbalance that was already present in the social care service, as well as a fundamental review of the model of social care provided in England; a well-resourced and trained workforce – a national, integrated health and care workforce strategy would go some way to tackle the crippling workforce issues facing social care; and outcome-based commissioning – the NHS needs a joined-up approach to commissioning, with people at the forefront of local decisions.

Last updated on hub: 07 September 2020