COVID-19 resources

Results 101 - 110 of 445

Order by    Date Title

Keeping your team motivated

Skills for Care

Staff resilience and motivation are vital as employers try to meet the many challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic. This webinar highlights the leadership behaviours which staff find most satisfying and motivating in normal times, but especially so in times of crisis.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Human Resources in the time of COVID-19

Skills for Care

The impact of COVID-19 has created an extremely challenging time for the social care workforce. There are a number of HR issues that are causing confusion and complications for both employers and employees, including furlough, sick leave and annual leave. This webinar – co-delivered with ACAS – covers many of the questions that have been raised by managers.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Attracting workers

Skills for Care

Social distancing means some traditional face to face activities to reach candidates, such as recruitment fairs and open days, are not currently possible. Employers are seeking different ways to attract people to their workforce. This webinar provides practical suggestions to help care providers explore linking with the local community to reach potential candidates and receive support with recruitment activities.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Managing bereavement

Skills for Care

This COVID-19 response webinar focuses on bereavement and the staff experience of losing a colleague or a person they are caring for. Bereavement is the experience of losing someone important to us and is characterised by grief, which is the process and the range of emotions we go through as we gradually adjust to the loss. Claire Henry and colleagues from Skills for Care discuss what bereavement in the workplace setting means and how to support staff at this time including support to help move forward.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Essential training

Skills for Care

This webinar covers essential training and guidance, training for regulated professionals and funding available and how to access it. It identifies training that remains a priority to ensure there is a skilled and competent workforce during the COVID-19 pandemic, and which is supported by the CQC. The webinar also highlights the funding available, and the endorsed training providers, to support adult social care providers with staff training needs during the pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Carers

House of Commons Library

This briefing paper provides information about the number of carers in the UK and the issues they face, examining the rights, benefits and support available to carers as well as current and previous Government policy on caring. In particular, it brings together key data data and policy on carers’ employment, incomes and earnings; benefit and allowances available to them; older carers; parent carers of disabled children; young carers; carers' health and wellbeing; local authority assessments and health and social care support for carers. It includes a brief discussion of past and future Government policy, including the proposed Carers Strategy and the forthcoming social care Green Paper. The briefing also contains some information relating to support for unpaid carers during the Coronavirus outbreak.

Last updated on hub: 25 June 2020

Coronavirus and me

Children's Commissioner for Wales

Sets out initial findings of a consultation on the experiences of children and young people in Wales in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic. The consultation captured information about the lives of over 23,700 children between the ages of 3-18 and run for a two-week period during lockdown. It focuses on children’s mental health and wellbeing, their ability to access to support, their education and learning, and their ability to play. The data shows that more than a third of children worried about Coronavirus, having concerns about how long the situation would last and fears that they or their loved ones might catch it. The majority report that they know where to get help for their mental and wellbeing needs but only 39 per cent feel confident seeking school counselling at the current time.

Last updated on hub: 25 June 2020

Safe working in education, childcare and children’s social care settings, including the use of personal protective equipment (PPE)

Department for Education

This guidance applies to staff working in education, childcare and children’s social care settings in England; children, young people and learners who attend these settings; and their parents or carers. It explains the strategy for infection prevention and control, including the specific circumstances PPE should be used, to enable safe working during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. The guidance also looks at the specific steps that should be taken in children’s homes, including secure children’s homes; in foster care settings; when dealing with young children or children with special educational needs; when providing social care visits to extremely clinically vulnerable children and young people. [Published 14 May 2020. Last updated 16 June 2020]

Last updated on hub: 25 June 2020

Pandemics and violence against women and children

Center for Global Development

Times of economic uncertainty, civil unrest, and disaster are linked to a myriad of risk factors for increased violence against women and children (VAW/C). Pandemics are no exception. In fact, the regional or global nature and associated fear and uncertainty associated with pandemics provide an enabling environment that may exacerbate or spark diverse forms of violence. Understanding mechanisms underlying these dynamics are important for crafting policy and program responses to mitigate adverse effects. Based on existing published and grey literature, we document nine main (direct and indirect) pathways linking pandemics and VAW/C, through effects of (on): (1) economic insecurity and poverty-related stress, (2) quarantines and social isolation, (3) disaster and conflict-related unrest and instability, (4) exposure to exploitative relationships due to changing demographics, (5) reduced health service availability and access to first responders, (6) inability of women to temporarily escape abusive partners, (7) virus-specific sources of violence, (8) exposure to violence and coercion in response efforts, and (9) violence perpetrated against health care workers. We also suggest additional pathways with limited or anecdotal evidence likely to effect smaller subgroups. Based on these mechanisms, we suggest eight policy and program responses for action by governments, civil society, international and community-based organizations. Finally, as research linking pandemics directly to diverse forms of VAW/C is scarce, we lay out a research agenda comprising three main streams, to better (1) understand the magnitude of the problem, (2) elucidate mechanisms and linkages with other social and economic factors and (3) inform intervention and response options. We hope this paper can be used by researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to help inform further evidence generation and policy action while situating VAW/C within the broader need for intersectional gender- and feminist-informed pandemic response.

Last updated on hub: 25 June 2020

Deaths involving COVID-19 in the care sector, England and Wales: deaths occurring up to 1 May 2020 and registered up to 9 May 2020

The Office for National Statistics

Provisional figures on deaths involving the coronavirus (COVID-19) within the care sector, in England and Wales. The report shows that since the beginning of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic (between the period 2 March and 1 May 2020) there were 45,899 deaths of care home residents (wherever the death occurred). COVID-19 was the leading cause of death in male care home residents and the second leading cause of death in female care home residents, after Dementia and Alzheimer disease. Between 10 April 2020 and 8 May 2020 there were 3,161 deaths of recipients of domiciliary care in England – this was 1,990 deaths higher than the three-year average (1,171 deaths).

Last updated on hub: 25 June 2020