COVID-19 resources

Results 1151 - 1160 of 1465

Staying apart to stay safe: the impact of visit restrictions on long-term care and assisted living survey

Office of the Seniors Advocate

Findings of a five-week survey about the impact of COVID-19 related visitor restrictions at long-term care and assisted living homes. The survey, answered by residents, their family members and the general public, had over 13,000 valid responses. The analysis suggests that most family members and residents support some visit restrictions during the pandemic, although they believe visits should be more frequent and that at least one more visitor for each resident should be permitted. Key findings include: before the pandemic, 55% of families were visiting long-term care and assisted living residents for an hour or more several times per week and even daily; most family members were not aware of the possibility of essential visits during the first four months of visit restrictions, and almost half of the people who did apply for an essential visit were refused; under the current visitation policy, the majority of visits are only once a week or less, and half the visits in long-term care are 30 minutes or less; 30% of current visits are outside only; currently, 65% of visits are observed by staff for some or all of the time; only 21% of visits are in the privacy of the resident’s room (75% of long-term care residents and almost 100% of assisted living residents live in private rooms); 70% of visitors are not allowed to touch their loved one; most visitors are washing their hands, wearing a mask, having their temperature checked, and answering health questions prior to each visit.

Last updated on hub: 11 November 2020

Staying mentally well this winter

Department of Health and Social Care

This plan sets out the steps that government is taking in the immediate term to help mitigate the impacts of the pandemic on people’s mental health and wellbeing this winter. It outlines the key resources being provided to look after mental wellbeing, government plans to empower everyone to look after their wellbeing and strengthen the support available for those struggling in communities, commitments to ensure services are there to support those who need it, and the packages available to help keep our frontline workers well.

Last updated on hub: 03 December 2020

Staying mentally well: winter plan 2020 to 2021

Department of Health and Social Care

This plan sets out the steps that government is taking in the immediate term to support people’s mental health and wellbeing during the second wave of the coronavirus and winter months ahead. It outlines the key resources being provided to look after mental wellbeing, the government’s plans to strengthen the support available for those struggling in communities, commitments to ensure services are there to support those who need it, and the packages available to help keep our frontline workers well.

Last updated on hub: 24 November 2020

Staying safe during COVID-19: a guide for victims and survivors of domestic abuse

SafeLives

Guide for staying safe during COVID-19 for victims and survivors produced by the charity SaveLives.

Last updated on hub: 04 June 2020

Staying safe during COVID-19: guidance for practitioners working with those who harm

SafeLives

Guidance to help practitioners working with perpetrators of domestic violence during the COVID-19 crisis. The document explores: how to ensure clients get support from family and friends; self-care; general safety planning; structured strategy to help clients de-escalate situations before they become violent or abusive; and supporting support workers.

Last updated on hub: 30 June 2020

Steps to take following the death of a person who worked in adult social care in England

Department of Health and Social Care

This guidance sets out the several actions that employers may need to take in the event of the death of a worker in adult social care from coronavirus (COVID-19), regardless of professional role or employer's profile, and including volunteers. The guidance covers: contact the family; telling others at work; reporting to the Health and Safety Executive; informing the Department of Health and Social Care; informing the Care Quality Commission; supporting the family’s coronavirus life assurance scheme application; and sharing information about the coronavirus bereavement scheme. [Published 19 June 2020; Last updated 7 July 2020]

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Still here for children: sharing the experiences of NSPCC staff who supported children and families during the COVID-19 pandemic

National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children

This report explores how NSPCC have staff adapted their ways of working to enable them to continue to support children and families during the pandemic; what they have learnt about the needs of children and families; and how they felt about the new ways of working. Fifteen NSPCC staff members working in a variety of frontline and strategic roles in our Together for Childhood sites in Glasgow, Plymouth and Stoke participated in this project. During lockdown, they were asked to complete three fortnightly reflective diary entries, to consider their experiences of supporting children and families over the preceding two weeks. Key learning includes: working online enabled planned work to continue but created new barriers to access for some families; working together with partners helped NSPCC staff respond to the needs of local communities; financial insecurity left families in need of basic essentials; staff felt that children were more at risk of experiencing abuse at home and online; reduced opportunities for face-to-face contact made it more challenging to assess risk and safeguard children; mental health declined among children and young people, resulting in an increased need for support services; separation of children in care from their birth parents created challenges around contact; working from home created concerns about confidentiality and exposing family members to the content of their work; lack of face-to-face contact with children, families and colleagues had a negative impact on staff wellbeing. Overall, data from the reflective diary entries indicate that staff felt lockdown restrictions had a detrimental impact on children and families.

Last updated on hub: 22 December 2020

Stories of care homes across the country: episode 3

My Home Life England

'Conversations with Care Homes' is a series by My Home Life England (MHLE). This episode focuses on resources on the stories of care homes across the country. It includes examples of rising PPE costs, but also how local businesses are rallying together and donating supplies. Resourceful managers are contacting their councils and MPs for support regarding staff transport, whilst others are using isolation as a chance to reflect on their person centred care. Finally, what talents within the care team could bring joy to both residents and staff? Video posted 24 April, 2020.

Last updated on hub: 09 June 2020

Stories of shielding: life in the pandemic for those with health and care needs

National Voices

Brings together the voices and stories of people with long-term health conditions during COVID-19. The report is based on the submissions to the digital platform Our COVID Voices, which was created for people with health and care needs to share their experiences. The platform received 70 unfiltered views and stories from people at great risk of all the effects of the pandemic, including anxiety, uncertainty and changes to their care. But it goes much deeper, into their relationships, their jobs and dealing with the everyday aspects of life in the pandemic. This document collates quotes from these stories to provide an overview of the real-life experiences of individuals shielding.

Last updated on hub: 15 October 2020

Straddling the divide: digital exclusion during COVID-19 and beyond

International Longevity Centre - UK

This commentary discusses how COVID-19 risks widening inequalities caused by digital exclusion, but can also act as a catalyst to accelerate digital inclusion efforts. It reports that around 11.9 million people in the UK currently lack the digital skills they need for everyday life, meaning a significant proportion of people self-isolating may be stuck in their homes with limited options to avoid social isolation, get essentials and stay safe. It also highlights how many innovators in business and local government have been working to support those digitally excluded during the COVID-19 pandemic. The commentary recommends that the Government set up a nationally coordinated volunteer service to teach digital skills to those most at risk of digital exclusion during the lockdown.

Last updated on hub: 29 May 2020