COVID-19 resources

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Readying the NHS and social care for the COVID-19 peak

House of Commons

An examination of the health and social care response to COVID-19 in England and of the challenges to the services that the outbreak posed. The NHS was severely stretched but able to meet overall demand for COVID-19 treatment during the pandemic’s April peak; from early March to mid-May, the NHS increased the quantity of available ventilators and other breathing support, which are essential for the care of many COVID-patients. The report suggests that it has been a very different story for adult social care, despite the hard work and commitment of its workforce. Years of inattention, funding cuts and delayed reforms have been compounded by the Government’s slow, inconsistent and, at times, negligent approach to giving the sector the support it needed during the pandemic – responsibilities and accountabilities were unclear at the outset and there has been a failure to issue consistent and coherent guidance throughout the pandemic; 25,000 patients from were discharged from hospitals into care homes without making sure all were first tested for COVID-19; and the Government failed to provide adequate PPE for the social care sector and testing to the millions of staff and volunteers through the first peak of the crisis. The report argues that there are many lessons that the government must learn, not least giving adult social care equal support to the NHS and considering them as two parts of a single system, adequately funded and with clear accountability arrangements.

Last updated on hub: 03 August 2020

Introduction to Safeguarding Adult Reviews (SARs) In Rapid Time

Social Care Institute for Excellence

SCIE discusses the need for a rapid review process to enable system learning that is identified and shared beyond the location of the incident.

Last updated on hub: 31 July 2020

Hospital discharge and preventing unnecessary hospital admissions (COVID-19)

Social Care Institute for Excellence

This guide discusses the lessons learned from hospital discharge and avoidance during the COVID-19 pandemic. It highlights challenges faced and good practice to prevent unnecessary admissions going forward.

Last updated on hub: 31 July 2020

Webinar recording: Co-production and communities

Social Care Institute for Excellence

SCIE will be looking at how commissioners and communities can work successfully together to maximise the existing resources and provide the best possible outcomes for people.

Last updated on hub: 31 July 2020

Webinar recording: Turn around your urgent SARs in rapid time

Social Care Institute for Excellence

SCIE has worked with Safeguarding Adult Boards (SABs) to develop and test a new model for conducting Safeguarding Adult Reviews (SARs) In-Rapid-Time.

Last updated on hub: 31 July 2020

COVID-19: In conversation with Kate Terroni

Social Care Institute for Excellence

Dr Ossie Stuart, SCIE trustee, in conversation with Kate Terroni, Chief Inspector of Adult Social Care at the Care Quality Commission

Last updated on hub: 30 July 2020

Education during the Covid-19 pandemic and transitioning back to school: experiences of the fostering sector

The Fostering Network

Findings of a rapid response survey for foster carers and fostering services across the UK to understand fostered children’s experiences of education during the pandemic. The first part of the survey covered attendance at school of fostered children, provisions children received from their educational providers, the frequency of contact from the educational provider, whether they received any equipment to support learning if necessary and the experiences of the foster carer supporting the child through these changes. The second part of the survey covered children transitioning back to school and what support was felt children would need when doing this. The evidence shows that the vast majority of children in foster care have been not attending educational settings and have received very different offers and experiences of education throughout the coronavirus pandemic. While some have thrived from more one to one support and the removal of some external pressures, others have experienced increased anxiety and other mental health problems and have been excluded before being given the chance to attend educational provisions. The experience of educating during lockdown has also brought to the fore the need for more individualised education plans for looked after children. Foster carers highlighted three forms of support they would like to see in place for the children in their care: extra tuition including one to one tuition; flexible and individualised transition arrangements; and mental health support. The report argues that the role of the foster carer in the team around the child will be more important than ever when the autumn term begins while it is also important that the child is consulted with and given the opportunity to feed into their own education plans.

Last updated on hub: 30 July 2020

The doctor will Zoom you now: getting the most out of the virtual health and care experience: insight report

National Voices

Findings of a rapid, qualitative research study designed to understand the patient experience of remote and virtual consultations. The study engaged 49 people using an online platform, with 20 additional one to one telephone interviews. Participants were also invited to attend an online workshop on the final day of the study. All participants had experienced a remote consultation during the lockdown period of the COVID-19 pandemic. The report suggests that remote consultations and the use of technology offer some great opportunities to make significant improvements to general practice, hospital outpatient and mental health appointments, but making the most of this opportunity means understanding the patient experience. For many people, remote consultations can offer a convenient option for speaking to their health care professional. They appreciate quicker and more efficient access, not having to travel, less time taken out of their day and an ability to fit the appointment in around their lives. Most people felt they received adequate care and more people than not said they would be happy with consultations being held remotely in future. However, there is no one size that fits all solution. Key to a successful shift to remote consultations will be understanding which approach is the right one based on individual need and circumstance. The report argues that a blended offer, including text, phone, video, email and in-person would provide the best solution and an opportunity to improve the quality of care. By focusing on the needs of people receiving care and using a combination of communication tools a more equal space for health care providers and patients to interact can be created.

Last updated on hub: 30 July 2020

Evaluation of the CAMHS In-Reach to Schools Pilot Programme: pilot progress and the impact of Covid 19, supplementary paper to the interim report

Welsh Government

This paper supplements the evaluation of the CAMHS In-Reach to Schools pilot, a programme that aims to build capacity (including skills, knowledge and confidence) in schools to support pupils’ mental health and well-being and improve schools’ access to specialist liaison, consultancy and advice when needed. It presents the data gathered through the second round of qualitative case-study research with a sample of school clusters, services, such as Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), school counselling, educational psychology and voluntary sector services, working with them, and interviews and discussions with CAMHS In-Reach Practitioners. The report aims to present the position for schools and services at the approximate midpoint of the pilot programme (early spring 2020) and provides a ‘snapshot’ of the impact of Covid-19 and the lockdown upon schools, pupils and services in late April and May 2020. These latter findings are drawn from a small sample at a period in time, when schools were responding to a fast-moving and challenging situation. The report finds that there is a clear need, and strong support, for the pilot, and the impact of Covid-19 is expected to increase this need. The pilot programme allows schools to be better prepared than they would otherwise have been for the return of pupils and, to a lesser degree, staff. Nevertheless, they still want support from the pilots to help them prepare for schools increasing their operations, and the difficulties pupils and staff may experience when they return.

Last updated on hub: 30 July 2020

Delivering a recovery that works for children: full list of recommendations

The Children's Society

This briefing sets out a comprehensive set of recommendations to ensure recovery plans from Covid-19 work for all children and young people. Drawn up and endorsed by a number of leading children’s sector organisations, the recommendations support a vision that considers the needs of children, young people and their families in the round, from conception to age 25; puts their voices at the heart of the recovery process; and is committed to investing in the services and workforce that they rely on. The recommendations consider both the short and the long-term, focusing on child poverty and social security; mental health and wellbeing; early years recovery; school returns; children in care; keeping children safe; and the overarching principles for recovery.

Last updated on hub: 29 July 2020

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