COVID-19 resources

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Professional practice guidance for social work in multi-disciplinary and multi-agency contexts during Covid-19 pandemic

British Association of Social Workers England

This guidance provides a professional risk framework to prepare for safe face to face social work practice within multi-disciplinary or multi-agency contexts during the coronavirus (Covid-19). It focuses on planning for and managing risk during Covid-19, working with people and families where someone is positive for Covid-19, negative or infection status unknown. It includes details of four key enablers for effective multi-disciplinary team working during the Covid-19 pandemic: good communication; approaches to decision making and co-ordination of care; organisational support; and enabling social workers to utilise their professional specific capabilities. The guidance is transferable across multi-disciplinary and/or multi-agency contexts. Developed by the British Association for Social Workers, the guidance is based on best available evidence, latest public health guidance, practice experience and expertise.

Last updated on hub: 11 May 2020

Promising approaches revisited: effective action on loneliness in later life

Campaign to End Loneliness

Drawing on the expertise and experience of leading figures in the field, academic literature and other evidence, this report presents an update to an earlier framework for loneliness interventions published in 2015. The framework helps to make sense of the different ways we can address loneliness, and explains how these approaches fit together to create an effective community response. The guide offers examples of these approaches in action so that organisations can find inspiration from others. The new guide learns the lessons of the last five years – as well as the impact of the pandemic and how organisations tackling loneliness have adapted. Its key message is that to tackle loneliness, different types of support need to be in place. People need to have the infrastructure to engage in social life, whether that is about digital, transport or a built environment that supports social life. Finally, there are direct ways of reducing loneliness whether that is one-to-one or in groups, or psychological support. A key change to the framework is the addition of the built environment as part of the ‘gateway infrastructure’ that helps tackle loneliness, recognising the role shops, cafes and pubs play as places to meet.

Last updated on hub: 09 November 2020

Promising approaches revisited: supplementary case studies

Campaign to End Loneliness

This supplement is a companion piece to the report Promising Approaches Revisited: Effective action on loneliness in later life. That report sets out the different elements needed for effective action to reduce loneliness. These case studies show the framework in action, illustrating how each element may work in practice. They cover: connectors services, including social prescribing; direct solution including group-based interventions and one-to-one approaches; gateway infrastructure such as digital technology and the built environment; and neighbourhood approaches.

Last updated on hub: 09 November 2020

Promoting the welfare, protection and care of victims of child trafficking during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic

Journal of Children's Services

Purpose: This paper aims to focus on the impact of Coronavirus (COVID-19) on victims of child trafficking. It highlights findings from research on other pandemics and outbreaks, the impact of child trafficking on children, the impact of COVID-19 on children and the impact of COVID-19 on victims of child trafficking. Design/methodology/approach: This paper focuses on the global impact of COVID-19 on victims of child trafficking. It highlights findings from research on other pandemics, the impact of child trafficking on children, the impact of COVID-19 on children and the impact of COVID-19 on victims of child trafficking. The findings provide a useful framework to guide the development of social policies to address this global crisis and to empower social workers and allied professionals to implement effective service responses. This is a crucial time for the entire world to diminish the impact of COVID-19, address this unprecedented crisis and uphold the human rights of all children. Findings: These findings provide a useful framework to guide the development of social policies to address this global pandemic and to support social workers and allied professionals to implement effective service responses. Originality/value: The author proposes three basic action items: commit to the promises made in international and regional mandates and guidelines; address the risk and vulnerability factors that have been identified; and implement the promising prevention activities described in the literature.

Last updated on hub: 30 December 2020

Proposal to regulate to stop movement of staff between care settings

Department of Health and Social Care

This consultation seeks views from the adult social care sector on the proposal to stop staff movement between different care settings and between health and care settings is critical to minimise the risk of infection of COVID-19. The findings of a study on the impact of coronavirus in care homes in England indicated one of the common factors in care homes with higher levels of infection among staff was the extent to which those homes employed staff who worked across multiple sites. The requirement would apply to Care Quality Commission (CQC) registered residential and nursing care home providers in England. These providers would be required not to use staff to provide nursing or personal care who are carrying on, or who have carried on within the previous 14 days, a regulated activity in another setting and/or for another health or social care provider subject to certain exceptions. The consultation closes on Wednesday 25 November 2020.

Last updated on hub: 25 November 2020

Proposals for person‐centred care in the COVID‐19 era. Delphi study

Health Expectations

Background: In this COVID‐19 era, we need to rethink the criteria used to measure the results of person‐centred care strategies. Objective: To identify priorities, and criteria that health services can use to pursue actually the goal of achieving person‐centred care. Design: Three‐phase online qualitative study performed during May–July of 2020 using the Delphi technique. Setting and Participants: An online platform was used for a consensus meeting of 114 participants, including health planning experts, health‐care institution managers, clinicians and patients. Main Outcome Measures: Criteria and indicators for the achievement of person‐centred care. Main Results: The first round began with 125 proposals and 11 dimensions. After the second round, 28 ideas reached a high level of consensus among the participants. Ultimately, the workgroup agreed on 20 criteria for goals in the implementation of person‐centred care during the COVID‐19 era and 21 related indicators to measure goal achievement. Discussion: Nine dimensions and 28 priorities were identified. These priorities are also in accordance with the quadruple aim approach, which emphasizes the need for care for health‐care professionals, without whom it is impossible to achieve a better quality of care. Conclusions: Person‐centred care continues to be a key objective. However, new metrics are needed to ensure its continued development during the restoration of public health services beyond the control of COVID‐19. Patient or Public Contribution: Twelve professionals and patient representatives participated voluntarily in the construction of the baseline questionnaire and in the selection of the criteria and indicators using an online platform for consensus meetings.

Last updated on hub: 19 April 2021

Proposals for person‐centred care in the COVID‐19 era. Delphi study

Health Expectations

Background: In this COVID‐19 era, we need to rethink the criteria used to measure the results of person‐centred care strategies. Objective: To identify priorities, and criteria that health services can use to pursue actually the goal of achieving person‐centred care. Design: Three‐phase online qualitative study performed during May–July of 2020 using the Delphi technique. Setting and Participants: An online platform was used for a consensus meeting of 114 participants, including health planning experts, health‐care institution managers, clinicians and patients. Main Outcome Measures: Criteria and indicators for the achievement of person‐centred care. Main Results: The first round began with 125 proposals and 11 dimensions. After the second round, 28 ideas reached a high level of consensus among the participants. Ultimately, the workgroup agreed on 20 criteria for goals in the implementation of person‐centred care during the COVID‐19 era and 21 related indicators to measure goal achievement. Discussion: Nine dimensions and 28 priorities were identified. These priorities are also in accordance with the quadruple aim approach, which emphasizes the need for care for health‐care professionals, without whom it is impossible to achieve a better quality of care. Conclusions: Person‐centred care continues to be a key objective. However, new metrics are needed to ensure its continued development during the restoration of public health services beyond the control of COVID‐19. Patient or Public Contribution: Twelve professionals and patient representatives participated voluntarily in the construction of the baseline questionnaire and in the selection of the criteria and indicators using an online platform for consensus meetings.

Last updated on hub: 11 May 2021

Protect, respect, connect – decisions about living and dying well during COVID-19: CQC’s review of ‘do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation’ decisions during the COVID-19 pandemic

Care Quality Commission

This review looked at how ‘do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation’ (DNACPR) decisions were made during the pandemic in the context of advance care planning, across all types of health and care sectors, including care homes, primary care and hospitals. During our review, we heard about the experiences of over 750 people and about the distress that people face when they do not feel involved in decisions about their care. When done well, DNACPR decisions are an important aspect of advance care planning, and people should be fully involved in discussions about their care. Our findings show that there needs to be a focus on three key areas: 1. Information, training and support – we heard that some people felt they had been involved in the decision-making process but others felt that conversations around whether they would want to receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) came out of the blue and that they were not given the time or information to fully understand what was happening or even what a DNACPR was; 2. A consistent national approach to advance care planning – across all the areas that we looked at, there were many types of advance care planning in use and this lack of consistency and the problems this causes could affect the quality of care received by the person, and result in missed opportunities to support them in the right way at the right time; 3. Improved oversight and assurance – most providers and health and care professionals told us that people, their families, carers or advocates were involved in conversations about their care, including DNACPR decisions. But poor record keeping and lack of audits meant that we could not always be assured that people were being involved in conversations about DNACPR decisions, or that these were being made on individual assessments.

Last updated on hub: 22 March 2021

Protecting and safeguarding older people: Covid-19 information pack

Older People's Commissioner for Wales

This pack provides a range of useful information and resources about keeping older people safe in Wales – including how to identify older people who may be at risk, and contact details for key organisations that can provide crucial help and support.

Last updated on hub: 17 June 2020

Protecting and supporting the clinically extremely vulnerable during lockdown

National Audit Office

This report looks at how effectively the Government identified and met the needs of clinically extremely vulnerable people to 1 August 2020. The objective of the shielding programme (the Programme) was to minimise mortality and severe illness among those who are CEV by providing them with public health guidance and support to stay at home and avoid all non-essential contact. Through the shielding programme, CEV people could get support accessing food, medicine and basic care.. The report sets out: the inception of the shielding programme (Part One); identifying clinically extremely vulnerable people (Part Two); supporting clinically extremely vulnerable people (Part Three); and outcomes and lessons learned (Part Four). The report finds that the shielding programme was a swift government-wide response to protect clinically extremely vulnerable people against COVID-19, pulled together at pace in the absence of detailed contingency plans. Government recognised the need to provide food, medicines and basic care to those CEV people shielding to help meet its objective of reducing the number of people suffering from severe illness and dying from COVID-19. There was impressive initial support offered to many people, with food provided to just over 500,000 people. Although the need to support was urgent, it took time for people to be identified as CEV, and therefore access formal support. This followed challenges extracting data from different IT systems and the understandable need for GPs and trusts to review the List of vulnerable people from their clinical perspective. Given the challenges in assessing the impact of shielding on CEV people’s health, government cannot say whether the £300 million spent on this programme has helped meet its central objective to reduce the level of serious illness and deaths from COVID-19 across CEV people.

Last updated on hub: 15 February 2021

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