COVID-19 resources

Results 131 - 140 of 1465

Building rapport and establishing meaningful relationships using technology in social work

Social Care Institute for Excellence

For social workers and social care practitioners to support understanding on how to build rapport and establish relationships with the people you care for using technology.

Last updated on hub: 19 October 2020

Building relational research capacity in care homes in the COVID-19 era: applying recognition theory to the research agenda

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults

Purpose: Research can be an influential driver in raising care home standards and the well-being and human rights of residents. This paper aims to present a case for how a relational research capacity building programme could advance this agenda. Design/methodology/approach: This study uses Axel Honneth’s Recognition Theory as a lens through which to explore organisational and institutional factors (such as research capacity and investment) that can either enable or limit “recognition” in the context of research in care homes. This paper draws on recent evidence from the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK and worldwide, to argue that such a relational capacity building agenda is even more pressing in the current context, and that it resonates with evidence from existing relational capacity building initiatives. Findings: A lack of relevant research arguably contributed to the crisis experienced by the care home sector early in the pandemic, and there are only tentative signs that residents, care home providers and staff are now informing the COVID-19 research agenda. Evidence from pre COVID-19 and insights from Honneth’s Recognition Theory suggest that relational approaches to building research capacity within the care home sector can better generate evidence to inform practice. Originality/value: This is a novel application of recognition theory to research in the care home sector. Drawing on theory, as well as evidence, has enabled the authors to provide a rationale as to why relationship-based research capacity building in care homes warrants further investment.

Last updated on hub: 29 December 2020

Building relational research capacity in care homes in the COVID-19 era: applying recognition theory to the research agenda

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults

Purpose: Research can be an influential driver in raising care home standards and the well-being and human rights of residents. This paper aims to present a case for how a relational research capacity building programme could advance this agenda. Design/methodology/approach: This study uses Axel Honneth’s Recognition Theory as a lens through which to explore organisational and institutional factors (such as research capacity and investment) that can either enable or limit “recognition” in the context of research in care homes. This paper draws on recent evidence from the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK and worldwide, to argue that such a relational capacity building agenda is even more pressing in the current context, and that it resonates with evidence from existing relational capacity building initiatives. Findings: A lack of relevant research arguably contributed to the crisis experienced by the care home sector early in the pandemic, and there are only tentative signs that residents, care home providers and staff are now informing the COVID-19 research agenda. Evidence from pre COVID-19 and insights from Honneth’s Recognition Theory suggest that relational approaches to building research capacity within the care home sector can better generate evidence to inform practice. Originality/value: This is a novel application of recognition theory to research in the care home sector. Drawing on theory, as well as evidence, has enabled the authors to provide a rationale as to why relationship-based research capacity building in care homes warrants further investment.

Last updated on hub: 10 December 2020

Busting bureaucracy: empowering frontline staff by reducing excess bureaucracy in the health and care system in England

Department of Health and Social Care

This is the government response to a public consultation on reducing bureaucracy in the health and social care system. COVID-19 has demonstrated the benefits that lifting bureaucratic burdens can offer and given us some learnings in terms of the best ways to do so. This document outlines the actions that can be taken to drive changes to culture and leadership, simplify assurance and accountability processes and review the system architecture to drive better integration of services. Ultimately empowering people to get on with their jobs and deliver better outcomes. The report highlights eight priority areas for action: data and information will be requested, shared and used intelligently; system and professional regulation will be proportionate and intelligent; day-to-day staff processes will be simple, helpful and effective; the government will legislate to make procurement rules more flexible; GPs will have more time to focus on clinical work and improving patient care; appraisals will be streamlined and their impact increased; there will be greater digitisation of services; and a supportive culture is needed at a national and local level.

Last updated on hub: 26 November 2020

Can integrated care help in meeting the challenges posed on our health care systems by COVID-19? Some preliminary lessons learned from the European VIGOUR project

International Journal of Integrated Care

The COVID-19 pandemic puts health and care systems under pressure globally. This current paper highlights challenges arising in the care for older and vulnerable populations in this context and reflects upon possible perspectives for different systems making use of nested integrated care approaches adapted during the work of the EU-funded project VIGOUR (“Evidence based Guidance to Scale-up Integrated Care in Europe”, funded by the European Union’s Health Programme 2014–2020 under Grant Agreement Number 826640).

Last updated on hub: 16 November 2020

Can social prescribing support the COVID-19 pandemic?

Centre for Evidence Based Medicine

This document looks at how social prescribing can be implemented within the current coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. It finds that although there is limited evidence on how social prescribing can be best implemented within the current COVID-19 pandemic, there are an increasing array of anecdotal accounts that suggest the importance of maintaining community connectedness during this time.

Last updated on hub: 29 April 2020

Canadian reflections on the Covid-19 pandemic in social work education: from tsunami to innovation

Social Work Education (The International Journal)

Looking back, the first wave of the pandemic was about to hit us and we could not know the impact then; the pedagogic, the emotional/human/relational, and the collaborative. Immediate modifications required pedagogy and pandemic balancing, prioritizing student safety. These reflections of three academics in leadership roles in the Faculty of Social Work faculty at a large university in western Canada, span from mid-March to early May, 2020 as COVID-19 approached. The reflections consider social work education comprehensively, as an integrated system. This article recounts the human and emotional nature of experience; approaches to interacting and collaborating with colleagues, partners, and stakeholders; ways of innovating on local, provincial, and national levels; and examples of how core social work values guided our work. The article suggests we embraced technology and found energy in innovation through collaboration about pedagogic decisions. It is here among innovation and collaboration, that we discovered our strengths and gained confidence to move forward. This manuscript provided an opportunity to reflect on the ways in which this crisis has forced openness to innovation toward the future of social work education. It also serves as a call to other schools and faculties of social work to share their reflections.

Last updated on hub: 09 November 2020

Capturing beneficial change from the COVID-19 pandemic: response from the British Geriatrics Society

British Geriatrics Society

This report provides examples of the beneficial innovations that have been implemented across the NHS during the COVID-19 pandemic. It argues that they should be consolidated and retained as health care services start to resume business as usual. Some of the innovations take place at the interface between health and social care, giving an indication of how integrated care can move forward. The examples are organised into ten themes, covering: proactive anticipatory care for older people with frailty; urgent primary care response; specialist-led assessment and treatment at home; coordinated multi-agency support for care homes; person-centred advance care planning; age-attuned acute care; safe, effective and timely transfers of care; optimising rehabilitation and recovery; virtual clinics; and digitally-enabled care. For each theme, the report provides a short description of the innovation, one or two examples of this innovation being implemented and a brief outline of the benefits to patients and staff. The document concludes with details of the key enablers that are present throughout the themes and details on how these innovations can be sustained nationally to ensure that the lessons learned in the pandemic are not lost.

Last updated on hub: 07 July 2020

Care Act easements: guidance for local authorities

Department of Health and Social Care

The guidance sets out how local authorities can use the new Care Act provisions, created under the Coronavirus Act 2020, to prioritise care and support to those who need it most during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. The changes fall into four key categories: the assessment of people’s care and support needs; financial assessments; preparation and review of care and support plans; and duties on Local Authorities to meet eligible care and support needs, or the support needs of a carer, are replaced with a power to meet needs. The provisions are temporary and should only be used when it is not possible for local authorities to comply with their duties under the Care Act 2014. [Published 31 March 2020. Last updated 1 September 2020].

Last updated on hub: 01 April 2020

Care and support workers’ perceptions of health and safety issues in social care during the COVID-19 pandemic: initial findings, 15 April 2020

University of Kent

This paper provides initial findings from legal and survey data about the role of care and support providers in the pandemic as employers with legal responsibilities for preventing harm to staff and people who use their services. The evidence suggests that care and supports workers, care home residents and other users of care and support services are exposed to the risk of SARS-CoV-2 virus without the protections to which they are legally entitled. The research team worked with UNISON in the North West of England to analyse findings from a survey of 2,600 care workers in approximately 1,200 different settings across residential care, home care, and support services for people with learning disabilities. The analysis of results is split into three sections, covering concerns about the need for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE); pay problems; and other COVID-19 related health and safety concerns. The findings reveal that: a large majority of respondents believe too little is being done by employers to keep staff safe from the risks SARS-CoV-2 infection; a large majority of respondents believe too little is being done by employers to keep people using care and support safe; 8 in 10 care workers think that they would not be paid their wages as normal if they had to self-isolate; care workers who are ill with COVID-19 are not all self-isolating; care workers believe that lack of attention to minimising the risk of infection in care and support settings has directly contributed to outbreaks of COVID-19 in social care settings.

Last updated on hub: 14 December 2020