COVID-19 resources

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The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on social work education and practice in the Netherlands

Social Work Education (The International Journal)

During the first half of 2020, the outbreak of the COVID-19 virus had a huge global impact. The physical health of many was (often severely) threatened and affected, resulting in numerous deaths. Furthermore, all aspects of human coexistence came under pressure, such as economic activities and material living conditions, psychological well-being and social contacts, human rights and democratic decision-making, international political relations and global solidarity. As in other parts of the world, COVID-19 kept the Netherlands in its grip. This article addresses the following questions:-What impact did pandemic and policy have on Dutch social work education and how was this experienced by students?-What was the impact of pandemic and policy on social work practices and what were its challenges for social professionals?-What does this all mean for the future of social work education, since it has to take the present concerns of students into account as well as prepare them for social work practice in the near future?

Last updated on hub: 12 November 2020

The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the charitable sector, and its prospects for recovery

Demos

This paper explores the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the charity sector, its prospects for 2021 and beyond, and how the sector – with the support of the Government and grant makers – can put itself on a more sustainable footing as the UK recovers from the crisis. The report reviews the evidence on the impact of the pandemic on charity services and revenues, to ascertain how they have been adapting to and coping with this period. It also looks at the varying challenges for 2021 – those that directly result from the pandemic, the impact of the broader economic picture, as well as challenges the charitable sector was grappling with pre-pandemic, which will no doubt come to a head in the months and years which follow it. Section 1 presents the state of the charitable sector before the crisis. Section 2 then looks at how the pandemic has affected charity services and revenues. Section 3 discusses how the charity sector will fare in 2021. And finally, Section 4 presents a series of recommendations for the government, grant funders and charitable organisations respectively, to achieve more resilience, recovery and future growth. The report argues that the Covid-19 crisis will decimate the charity sector in the UK unless the Government takes urgent action. Without urgent and targeted intervention, grassroots charity organisations - those less likely to have adequate reserves - risk being wiped out altogether. At the same time, public giving throughout the crisis risks being used as a stopgap to fill widening deficiencies in statutory provision. The report calls on the Government to immediately announce a new short-term emergency funding package; urgently review existing Covid-19 policies; ensure that public generosity during the pandemic is used as intended; and provide longer term investment in the hardest-hit charitable sectors.

Last updated on hub: 01 February 2021

The impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people

Children and Society

The COVID‐19 pandemic has had an enormous impact across the world. This discussion paper examines the effect that lockdown has had on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people. This paper is from a UK perspective in the light of the international evidence. Many of the discussion points raised resonate globally. This paper discusses how these issues can be dealt with and set out potential solutions as we emerge from this global crisis.

Last updated on hub: 15 January 2021

The impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people

Children and Society

The COVID‐19 pandemic has had an enormous impact across the world. In this discussion paper, we examine the effect that lockdown has had on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people. We write from a UK perspective in the light of the international evidence. Many of the discussion points raised resonate globally. We discuss how these issues can be dealt with and set out potential solutions as we emerge from this global crisis.

Last updated on hub: 16 January 2021

The impact of the first UK Covid-19 lockdown on carers and people living with low prevalence dementia: results from the Rare Dementia Support survey

medRxiv

Introduction The public health measures imposed to contain Covid-19 during the first UK lockdown resulted in significant changes in the provision of community support and care for people with dementia. People with low prevalence and young-onset dementias often experience non-memory, behavioural or neuropsychiatric symptoms that require specialised support. Objective This study explored the impact of the first Covid-19 lockdown on people living with low prevalence and young-onset dementia and their carers in the UK. Method An online survey, including eleven questions about the impact of the lockdown on both the person with dementia and their family caregivers was conducted. Participants were people living with dementia and caregivers who are members of the UK national-reach organisation Rare Dementia Support. Results 184 carers and 24 people with dementia completed the survey. People with dementia experienced worsening of cognitive symptoms (70%), ability to do things (62%) and well-being (57%) according to their carers. Carers also reported a reduction in the support received for caring (55%). 93% of carers of people living in care homes reported a reduction in their ability to provide care. 26% of carers reported changes in the medication of the person with dementia during the lockdown. 74% of people with dementia reported decreased ability to connect with people socially. Conclusions People with dementia experienced a worsening of dementia symptoms, removal of support and increased difficulty to connect with other people socially during the 1st wave of Covid-19. Carers encountered barriers to both receiving and providing support and a decline in their own mental health and well-being.

Last updated on hub: 15 January 2021

The impact of the outbreak

Professional Social Work

As the coronavirus pandemic escalated in the UK, more than a thousand social workers alerted the British Association of Social Workers (BASW) to the effect on services and communities. The survey was conducted before the UK government announced a three-week lockdown in March 2020. Key concerns raised by social workers were: the safety of or protecting people and their rights; trying to prioritise home visits and operate rotas so that face-to-face calls are limited to urgent cases only. Many respondents said they themselves were in groups at heightened risk of coronavirus or lived with someone who was. Where possible, social workers said they were trying to carry out assessments or maintain contact with people using technology. Hospital social workers reported that the crisis was hitting efforts to support people to move out of hospital. The impact on social work education is also covered. Amid the immense pressures on social work services, many social workers said they had been buoyed by the efforts of communities to come together and support each other during the crisis. When asked, what would help social workers? Practitioners across specialisms called for more leadership, guidance and advice on how to carry out their jobs.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

The interpersonal and psychological impacts of COVID-19 on risk for late-life suicide

Gerontologist

Older adults experience increased risk for suicide compared to the general population, and the circumstances surrounding the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) may potentiate this risk. We discuss how current COVID-19 pandemic-related policies are likely to harm older adults disproportionately. COVID-19 pandemic social distancing policies and ethical guidelines for COVID-19 treatment may exacerbate experiences of social isolation, perceived expendability, and exposure to suffering, which are related to the 3 main components of the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide (i.e., thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness to society, and capability for suicide). The COVID-19 pandemic poses a drain on services and has drawn ethical debates about policies around treating younger adults first. These experiences may lead older adults to have reduced access to needed medical and psychiatric services and may convey damaging messages of expendability. Furthermore, the potential prolonged stress associated with the COVID-19 pandemic may affect neurological, immunological, and health functioning—exacerbating suicide risk. Potential venues to increase treatment options and decrease social isolation are discussed. We acknowledge optimistic effects as well, such as “pulling together” as a society and the many valuable ways older adults may contribute during this crisis.

Last updated on hub: 29 January 2021

The jewel in the corona: crisis, the creativity of social dreaming, and climate change

Journal of Social Work Practice: Psychotherapeutic Approaches in Health, Welfare and the Community

The Coronavirus crisis links to the climate crisis in ways that challenge humankind to demonstrate an unprecedented creativity and adaptability to change. This article discusses, both in content and style, this need for creative change and what that might look like. It asserts that the current discourse, with its linear rationality and logic system will fail in the face of the enormity of such epistemological and ontological disturbance. Using the example of social dreaming as a different form of thinking, the article encourages the reader to radically reconsider thought, feelings, reason and creativity as a means to rethinking solutions for a shared future.

Last updated on hub: 23 December 2020

The Mental Capacity Act (2005) (MCA) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic

Department of Health and Social Care

Emergency guidance for health and social care staff in England and Wales who are caring for adults who lack the relevant mental capacity to consent to their care and treatment during the coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic. The guidance is designed to minimise additional pressures on hospitals and care home and ensures that decision makers are clear about the steps they need to take. It focuses on new scenarios and potential ‘deprivations of liberty’ created by the outbreak. The guidance states that it may be necessary during the COVID-19 Pandemic to "to change the usual care and treatment arrangements of somebody who lacks the relevant mental capacity to consent to such changes" and that changes to a person’s care or treatment in these scenarios will not constitute a new deprivation of liberty. The guidance includes a decision-making flow chart for decision makers in hospitals and care home. The guidance will apply until withdrawn by the Department.[First published 9 April 2020; last updated 12 January 2021].

Last updated on hub: 14 April 2020

The Mental Capacity Act (2005) (MCA) and deprivation of liberty safeguards (DoLS) during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic: additional guidance

Department of Health and Social Care

Emergency guidance for health and social care staff in England and Wales who are caring for adults who lack the relevant mental capacity to consent to their care and treatment during the coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic. This document provides additional guidance to supplement 'The Mental Capacity Act (2005) (MCA) and deprivation of liberty safeguards (DoLS) during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic', which was published in April 2020. It includes guidance on: testing someone who lacks the relevant mental capacity; providing life-saving treatment to someone who lacks the capacity to consent; hospitals and care homes; and using emergency public health powers when someone who lacks relevant capacity needs to be isolated because they have symptoms and are not following public health advice. [First published 29 May 2020; last updated 12 January 2021]

Last updated on hub: 01 June 2020

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