COVID-19 resources

Results 1441 - 1450 of 1613

Order by    Date Title

The neglect of adult social care during Covid-19

British Medical Association

An examination of the impact of Covid-19 on social care, focusing on failings in testing, namely hospital discharges of untested patients into care homes, and the inadequate provision of personal protective equipment. The article recognises the complex and fragmented structure of adult social care but argues that these complexities cannot be resolved by the NHS “taking over” social care; rather efforts should be renewed to achieve a lasting settlement for social care, understanding and valuing it in its own right, not just as an adjunct to the NHS.

Last updated on hub: 20 August 2020

The online adaptation and outcomes of a family-based intervention addressing substance use disorders

Research on Social Work Practice

Purpose: This article compares outcomes of a family-based prevention program from its original in-person mode to an online mode in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Celebrating Families!™ is designed to improve parenting skills, family functioning, and family relationships to break the cycle of substance use problems. Method: This mixed-methods, quasi-experimental study compared outcomes of in-person and online treatment conditions and content analysis of open-ended responses to a satisfaction survey. Results: Both groups showed improvement in outcomes, with moderate effect sizes and high satisfaction. Average scores of the online groups were generally lower than the in-person scores. Qualitative data yielded participants’ accounts of improvements in parenting behaviors, family relationships, coping skills, and knowledge insights. Conclusions: Despite the contexts of COVID-19, findings provided evidence that such relational group interventions can be feasibly administered online and can effect changes required to break the cycle of substance use problems and adverse family experiences.

Last updated on hub: 12 February 2021

The Open University: the path forward for social care in England

The Open University

This report examines the issues confronting adult social care (including workforce professionalisation) and makes recommendations to resolve them. It does so through a review of available literature from around the UK, examining the circumstances and approaches of the four nations. It also draws on a survey of 500 English leaders and managers – based in every region and working for public, voluntary and private-sector organisations delivering social care services, and within local authority social work teams – in order to gauge individuals’ experiences, hopes and fears. The study found that across the social care sector, 76% of respondents said they were sufficiently staffed, with a third (34%) saying they had too many staff for their current workload; despite optimism about numbers, concerns about skills shortages persist – nearly half (44%) of all respondents said they had only the bare minimum of skills to operate, or lacked vital skills to run their operations successfully; COVID-19 has changed working practices, making flexibility a priority, but has not shifted longer-term perceptions of where skills gaps lie; most managers are worried about social care’s enduring challenges squeezing their future access to the staff they need – 54% were worried the UK’s exit from the EU will make it harder for them to source skilled employees; many leaders believe sustainable funding and structured career development are needed to maintain and rebuild the sector – 42% said a defined career would be beneficial for the social care workforce.

Last updated on hub: 25 January 2021

The other side of the coin: adult social care reform in a post-COVID world

County Councils Network

The purpose of this think piece is to help shape thinking around the social care green paper, to distil the experience of County Councils and identify some key principles which CCN’s member authorities believe should be taken on board by policy makers in determining the direction of future adult social care reform. These principles have been collated under four broad themes specifically designed to support policy-makers focused on getting the big picture right. The four themes encompass: 1) scope – taking full account of the wide range of adult social care services delivered by councils and ensuring reform fully considers working age adults as well as older people and hospital discharges; 2) infrastructure – considering the best ways to deliver an adult social care system which is of high quality, provides value for money, and fully engages communities; 3) resource – providing the right resources to help adult social care be commissioned effectively to meet the needs of local communities; improvement – putting in place the necessary framework to not only ensures quality but create an ongoing culture of continuous improvement which helps everyone to live their best lives for as long as possible. The report attempts to inverse traditional thinking. Rather than seeing how social care can be used to cushion a health-centric system, it asks the reader to instead see the other side of the coin – how social care can ideally reduce the need for contact with acute health services as far as possible and be seamlessly integrated into wider place-based communities as the central service which ensures every citizen is able to live their best life.

Last updated on hub: 21 September 2020

The PCFSW and Social Work England best practice guide for risk assessment and prioritising children and families' needs during pandemic

Principal Children and Families Social Worker Network

Best practice guidance to support social care practitioners and managers in thinking about ethical, practical, and professional aspects of risk assessments and prioritising needs during coronavirus (Covid 19) pandemic. It draws on research and practice development project, offering evidence-based support for practitioners and managers to help continuity of services. The guidance has been developed by the Principal Children and Families Social Worker (PCFSW) network and Social Work England in response to the current crisis and will be updated in response to the changing circumstances.

Last updated on hub: 11 May 2020

The PCFSW and Social Work England best practice guide for video call/contact and virtual/online home visit

Principal Children and Families Social Worker Network

Best practice guidance to support social work and social care practitioners and managers in thinking about ethical, practical, and professional aspects of video call/contact and virtual/online home visits. It includes information on: planning a call, ensuring appropriate boundaries and specific points for home visits and online child protection conferences. The guidance was developed by the Principal Children and Families Social Worker (PCFSW) Network and Social Work England and has been informed by practitioners and managers. It has been developed in relation to the Covid-19 pandemic and the period of transition out of the current lockdown and will be updated in response to changing circumstances.

Last updated on hub: 11 May 2020

The PCFSW and Social Work England COVID-19 ethical response and best practice guide for children and families services

Principal Children and Families Social Worker Network

This good practice guide aims to encourage ethical thinking in response to the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic and support practitioners in applying social work values, principles and standards in their everyday practice, decisions and actions. It has been developed by the Principal Children and Families Social Worker (PCFSW) network and Social Work England and draws on the work of the PCFSW research and practice development project. It has been developed to inform practice and to support the implementation of relevant legislation, national guidance and practice standards provided by the Department of Education and Social Work England. The guidance will be updated in response to changing circumstances.

Last updated on hub: 11 May 2020

The PCFSW best practice guide for risk assessment and prioritising children and families' needs during pandemic

Principal Children and Families Social Worker Network

Drawing on research from the Principal Children and Families Social Worker (PCFSW) Network and feedback from local authorities, this guide will support social workers and local authorities in assessing and prioritising needs and risks of vulnerable children and families in the context of coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. It offers evidence-based support for practitioners and managers to help continuity of services and should be considered alongside the local authority's guidance to ensure continued support and safeguarding of vulnerable children and young people and their families and carers. The document can be used to support individual reflection, in supervision or in virtual group discussions to support reflection for and after action.

Last updated on hub: 06 April 2020

The possibility and importance of immersive technologies during COVID-19 for autistic people

Journal of Enabling Technologies

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify three key areas where autistic people may find themselves impacted through COVID-19, namely, education; employment; and anxiety. Design/methodology/approach: This paper provides some views based on the extensive experience of using immersive technologies for the utilisation and application with autistic groups during COVID-19. Findings: This paper offers some examples of immersive technology application that might be helpful for practitioners, services and others to consider in overcoming possible challenges faced by people with autism. Originality/value: This opinion piece offers expert insights to the role immersive technologies and virtual reality might play during COVID-19 in the lives of autistic groups.

Last updated on hub: 23 December 2020

The potential impact of COVID-19 on mental health outcomes and the implications for service solutions

NIHR Applied Research Collaboration (ARC) West

An evidence review of how infectious disease outbreaks which require quarantine or social isolation affect the prevalence of mental health conditions within the general population and healthcare workers, and the community and population-level approaches to prevent and address mental health conditions following such outbreaks. The review notes that all conclusions should be interpreted cautiously. However, the evidence suggests that an increase in the prevalence of mental health conditions is likely during, and immediately after, the COVID-19 outbreak. However, amongst the general population, this increase subsided after quarantine measures are lifted. Healthcare workers are at greater risk of adverse mental health outcomes, particularly those who are front-line staff. To prevent and address mental health conditions, most recommendations point towards the use of online, or remote, services and resources to support at-risk groups and the general population. A specific set of recommendations are also provided for the prevention and treatment of mental health conditions in healthcare workers.

Last updated on hub: 10 June 2020

Order by    Date Title