COVID-19 resources

Results 161 - 170 of 750

How fit were public services for coronavirus?

Institute for Government

This report sets out an assessment of how prepared and resilient public services, such as the NHS, social care, schools and the police, were for the Covid-19 pandemic. Findings are based on desk research, analysis of government data and interviews with civil servants, front-line staff, representative bodies and other experts. While all services benefited from the existence of emergency plans and command structures, these varied greatly in detail, focus and adaptability. The findings show that: Government plans were too focused on a flu pandemic, with not enough attention paid to the possibility of other types of pandemic; good planning ensured that hospitals could respond well to the first wave, but high staff vacancies and a maintenance backlog will make it far harder to restart routine services; adult social care services struggled because of poor quality national plans, weak communication between Whitehall and local government, and the large number of care homes; underinvestment in buildings and ICT meant the criminal justice system, particularly in criminal courts and prisons, struggled; however, planning for a no-deal Brexit in 2019 meant the Department of Health and Social Care had a greater understanding of how supply chains would be disrupted in a pandemic. The report makes a series of recommendations, including ensuring more regular pandemic planning exercises are conducted, with key ministers such as the prime minister and health secretary taking part within six months of taking office; ensuring providers of public services publish their plans for dealing with emergencies and report annually on progress; and ensuring Government spending decisions are based on the analysis of the resilience of public services.

Last updated on hub: 10 August 2020

Dementia and COVID-19: social contact

Alzheimer's Society

This briefing sets out the evidence for action to support social contact for people living with dementia and what the Government need to do next. It covers: the impact of COVID-19 on people with dementia in the UK; the importance of social contact for people living with dementia; maintaining social contact in care homes; supporting the delivery of home care services. The briefing observes that as well as the severe impact of COVID-19 itself, restrictions under lockdown have imposed a lack of social contact and interaction which are known to be contributing factor in the decline of people with dementia. The paper calls on the Government to lead a task force with Local Authorities and expert groups to address how they will support people with dementia as the country emerges from the lockdown over the next 6-12 months, with social contact at the heart of the solution. Specific recommendations for both care homes and home care are included.

Last updated on hub: 10 August 2020

PPE guide for community health and social care settings: what PPE to wear and when: an illustrative guide

Public Health England

This resource outlines personal protective equipment (PPE) advice for health and social care workers in community setting to prevent the transmission of COVID-19. It shows: which PPE to wear depending on where and how staff are working; how to work safely using your PPE and safer working practices to protect staff and residents. The guide sets out five common scenarios community health and social care professionals might encounter, describing what PPE they should wear in each case. The scenarios include: personal care involving touching the person who is cared for; when professionals are within 2 metres of anyone who has a cough; when staff are within 2 metres of the individual being cared for but not touching them; when staff are caring for a person who is shielding; and when they are in the workplace and 2 metres away from people they are caring for. This guidance should be used in conjunction with local policies.

Last updated on hub: 10 August 2020

Dementia and social contact

Alzheimer's Society

This briefing outlines the importance of social contact for people living with dementia during the COVID-19 pandemic. It sets out what actions local government can take to ensure that people living with dementia do not see their symptoms deteriorate as a result of limited social contact.

Last updated on hub: 10 August 2020

Visiting arrangements in care homes

Alzheimer's Society

This briefing sets out the key considerations Directors of Public Health should take into account in supporting care homes to reopen for people living with dementia during the Covid-19 crisis. It argues that the balance of risks between allowing visits and preventing the spread of infection must take account of what can be a permanent decline in abilities that social isolation can bring to people with dementia. In their risk assessments, local authorities must fully consider the particular needs of people affected by dementia and put in place appropriate steps to reopen care homes to visitors and offer them the support they need to so safely.

Last updated on hub: 10 August 2020

Webinar: Building back from COVID-19: tackling health inequality in partnership

Social Care Institute for Excellence

This webinar will support Integrated Care System (ICS) development, share good practice and to discuss practical solutions to issues that systems may be facing.

Last updated on hub: 06 August 2020

Over-exposed and under-protected: the devastating impact of COVID-19 on black and minority ethnic communities in Great Britain

Runnymede Trust, The

Findings of a survey exploring black and minority ethnic (BME) peoples experiences of the coronavirus pandemic and lockdown, and focusing on the impact of the pandemic on their physical and mental health, work, finances, relationships, childcare and schooling, and their understanding of the governments COVID-19 social and economic measures. The 2,585 adults (aged 18+) sampled for this survey included a ‘boost’ sample of 538 BME adults, taking the overall sample of BME respondents to 750 in the whole survey. Black and minority ethnic people are over-represented in COVID-19 severe illness and deaths - pre-existing racial and socioeconomic inequalities, resulting in disparities in co-morbidities between ethnic groups, have been amplified by COVID-19. The survey shows that BME people face greater barriers in shielding from coronavirus as a result of the types of employment they hold; they make greater use of public transport, are more likely to live in overcrowded and multigenerational households, and are less likely to be given appropriate PPE (personal protective equipment) at work. The survey also finds that BME groups are much less aware of the governments life-saving public health messaging around Covid-19, leaving them under-protected and vulnerable to coronavirus. The report makes a number of recommendations, including ensuring employers carry out risk assessments for staff with vulnerable characteristics, including black and minority ethnic backgrounds; ensuring that all key workers in public-facing roles have access to adequate PPE; prioritising a tailored Find, Test, Trace, Isolate and Support (FTTIS) programme ensuring vulnerable BME communities are identified and supported; strengthening the social security safety net; and increasing Statutory Sickness Pay and widen eligibility.

Last updated on hub: 06 August 2020

Caring and COVID-19: loneliness and use of services

Centre for International Research on Care, Labour and Equalities (CIRCLE)

This report focuses on experiences of feeling lonely and of accessing support among a key group of carers in April and May 2020, during the official COVID-19 lockdown period. Drawing on data from the April 2020 wave of Understanding Society COVID-19 survey, the report contrasts carers’ experiences with those of other people. An estimated 6,048,286 adults in the UK provided care to someone living outside their own household in 2020. They are a ‘subset’ of the 10,991,440 estimated adult carers. The analysis shows high levels of loneliness in May 2020 among carers who were female, employed or younger – overall, carers were more likely to have felt lonely than other people, with 1 in 3 female carers (1 in 4 male carers) having felt lonely in the previous 4 weeks and carers aged 17-45 being more likely to report feeling lonely than carers aged 65 or older. During the lockdown, many people were unable to access NHS services – in April 9 in 10 carers (8 in 10 other people) had their treatments cancelled or postponed; 4 in 5 carers (3 in 4 other people) did not get a hospital in-patient service they needed; and 1 in 4 carers in April, and 1 in 5 in May, needed to, but could not, access their GP. The report also looks at access to social and community services – overall, 1 in 4 carers needing help did not get a service they needed; figures improved in May, but carers remained worse off; in April, 50% of carers (2 in 5 other people) needing formal care did not get it and 2 in 5 carers and others who required a psychotherapy service did not get it.

Last updated on hub: 06 August 2020

Caring and COVID-19: financial wellbeing

Centre for International Research on Care, Labour and Equalities (CIRCLE)

This report considers the financial wellbeing of people providing unpaid care (outside their own household) in April and May 2020, during the UK’s official lockdown in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Drawing on data from the April 2020 wave of Understanding Society COVID-19 survey, the analysis also looks at carers’ likelihood of being furloughed and at changes in their working hours, analysing these by sex, age and employment status. An estimated 6,048,286 adults provided care to someone living outside their own household in the UK in 2020. They are a ‘subset’ of the 10,991,440 adults estimated to be carers. The analysis shows that In May 2020, carers had lower financial wellbeing than other people in the population – 21.5% experienced some degree of financial strain, saying they were ‘just about getting by’ or finding it ‘quite’ or ‘very’ difficult to do so and among women, more carers (22.3%) than non-carers (17.9%) had low financial wellbeing. 1 in 5 carers expected to be ‘worse off’ in April (1 in 8 in May) – their short-term finances were a concern for more people aged 31-65 than in other age groups, among both carers and other people. In May 2020, among people with paid jobs (including for carers), 1 in 5 were on furlough – 1 in 4 working carers aged 17-30 were furloughed, and 1 in 5 at other ages while 1 in 4 male carers were furloughed compared with 1 in 5 female carers.

Last updated on hub: 06 August 2020

Caring and COVID-19: hunger and mental wellbeing

Centre for International Research on Care, Labour and Equalities (CIRCLE)

This report looks at the use of foodbanks and the experience of hunger in the households of unpaid carers providing care to someone living outside their own household in April 2020, during COVID-19 lockdown. Drawing on data from the April 2020 wave of Understanding Society COVID-19 survey, the analysis also reports evidence of changes in carers’ mental wellbeing, analysing these by sex, age and employment status. There were an estimated 6,048,286 adults providing care to someone living outside their own household in the UK in 2020. They are a ‘subset’ of the 10,991,440 adults estimated to be carers. The analysis shows considerable evidence of the difficulties some carers face – 228,625 carers said someone in their household had gone hungry in the previous week with women being twice as likely as men to report this; figures were especially high for younger carers, reaching 12.24% for those aged 17-30. In addition, 106,450 carers (1.76%) said their household had used a foodbank in the past month – female carers were twice as likely as men to use foodbanks and foodbank use was especially high (8%) for carers aged 17-30. The report also looks at carers’ mental wellbeing in April 2020 and compares it with the same carers’ reported wellbeing in the 2017-19 wave of the survey. It shows that carers’ mental wellbeing was lower than that of non-carers in both surveys – mental wellbeing was much lower among female carers than male carers and lower for working age carers, especially those aged 17-45. Between 2017-19 and April 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic, the mental wellbeing of female carers, older carers, carers in employment and those without a paid job declined.

Last updated on hub: 06 August 2020