COVID-19 resources

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COVID-19 and care homes: update paper, 23 September 2020

This paper reviews the latest evidence on the transmission of Covid-19 in care homes. It focuses specifically on the relative risk of each of four routes of ingress of infection to the care home (hospital discharge, staff, visitor (professional or domestic) and community admissions) as well as the route of transmission within care homes once infection has entered, for which more detailed genomic studies are critical. Key findings include: although staff-to-staff transmission has been observed to have been a contributory factor in specific outbreaks, it is important not to generalise to all outbreaks and emphasise one route over another without clear evidence – studies undertaken so far indicate that multiple introductions are common; retrospective genomic analysis and seropositive studies in care homes find evidence for multiple routes of virus ingress to care homes, but are not systematic enough to quantify the relative frequency of different routes of ingress; evidence of staff to staff transmission has emerged in the genomic analysis (high confidence); weak evidence on hospital discharge and modelling the impact of visitors does not suggest a dominant causal link to outbreaks from these sources; public health measures that reduce community incidence could be effective in reducing ingress into care homes; asymptomatic or atypically symptomatic presentation in residents and staff mean that ingress may be hidden for a number of generations of disease; sequencing community tests to understand the comparator population is critical for the future.

Last updated on hub: 27 October 2020

Rapid review for care homes in relation to Covid-19 in Wales

Welsh Government

This rapid review aimed to ensure that the lessons from best practice are learned and shared by Local Authorities and Health Boards who were involved in working with care homes during the initial period of the Covid-19 pandemic in the spring and summer of 2020. The work for the review has included reading some research studies, reading many submitted reports by Health and Social Care leaders from Wales and a series of interviews with stakeholders including a number of Care Home managers and owners. The report includes sections summarising the context for care homes, the initial impact of the virus and the response, and the best practices that were found in helping care homes to address the pandemic. The final section draws together a set of considerations that health and social care partners could use to assist them in completing their action plans for the winter. The review highlights the importance for health and care to work in partnership with care home managers to ensure that: every care home has an effective Infection Control Plan that is put into place; every care home has an effective plan for business continuity that includes ensuring that there are staff available to meet residents’ needs; every care home should be supported to ensure there are meaningful and helpful day to day activities for residents and that the wellbeing of both staff and residents are taken into account in all the decisions that are made; every care home has the right protective equipment; every care home has access to tests for residents and staff to know who may have the virus; and every care home has good access to primary health services including GPs.

Last updated on hub: 27 October 2020

Mental health of children and young people in England, 2020: wave 1 follow up to the 2017 survey

NHS Digital

This report looks at the mental health of children and young people in England in July 2020, and changes since 2017. Experiences of family life, education and services, and worries and anxieties during the coronavirus pandemic are also examined. The findings draw on a sample of 3,570 children and young people interviewed face to face in 2017 and followed up online in July 2020, now aged between 5 and 22 years. Key findings include: rates of probable mental disorders have increased since 2017 in 2020, one in six (16.0%) children aged 5 to 16 years were identified as having a probable mental disorder, increasing from one in nine (10.8%) in 2017; the likelihood of a probable mental disorder increased with age – 27.2% of young women and 13.3% of young men were identified as having a probable mental disorder; among 11 to 16 year old girls, 63.8% with a probable mental disorder had seen or heard an argument among adults in the household, compared with 46.8% of those unlikely to have a mental disorder; about six in ten (62.6%) children aged 5 to 16 years with a probable mental disorder had regular support from their school or college, compared with 76.4% of children unlikely to have a mental disorder; children aged 5 to 16 years with a probable mental disorder were more than twice as likely to live in a household that had fallen behind with payments; children and young people with a probable mental disorder were more likely to say that lockdown had made their life worse.

Last updated on hub: 27 October 2020

Quarterly report on progress to address COVID-19 health inequalities

Her Majesty's Government

This is the first quarterly report on progress to address the findings of Public Health England’s ‘COVID-19: review of disparities in risks and outcomes’. The PHE review set out some of what was known at the time about COVID-19 and ethnicity, mainly focusing on what the disparities in risks and outcomes were rather than why they had arisen or what could be done about them. This report summarises the work undertaken across government since the report of the PHE review was published on 2 June. Working collaboratively across government and with the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and liaising with universities and researchers, the Race Disparity Unit (RDU) is building the evidence base to get a better understanding of what is driving these disparities. The report suggests that the current evidence shows that a range of socioeconomic and geographical factors such as occupational exposure, population density, household composition and pre-existing health conditions contribute to the higher infection and mortality rates for ethnic minority groups, but a part of the excess risk remains unexplained for some groups. The report looks at the progress so far made in relation to: the effectiveness and impact of current actions being undertaken by relevant government departments and their agencies to directly lessen disparities in infection and death rates of COVID-19; the development of new policy and guidance across Whitehall; understanding the key drivers of the disparities and the relationships between the different risk factors; understand the areas of general concern about data quality; leading engagement on the disparities highlighted with departmental ministers improving public health communications to ensure they can reach all communities across the country; building on and expand the stakeholder engagement undertaken by PHE; and improving public health communications to ensure they can reach all communities across the country.

Last updated on hub: 27 October 2020

The Government response to the Joint Committee on Human Rights reports on the detention of young people with learning disabilities and/or autism and the implications of the Government's COVID-19 response

Department of Health and Social Care

This is the Government’s formal response to the recommendations made by the Joint Committee on Human Rights in its report 'The detention of young people with learning disabilities and/or autism' published on 1 November 2019 and those made in its report 'Human Rights and the Government’s response to COVID-19: The detention of young people who are autistic and/or have learning disabilities' published on 12 June 2020. In the 2019 report the Committee concluded that young people’s human rights were being abused; that they were detained unlawfully contrary to their right to liberty, subjected to solitary confinement, more prone to self-harm and abuse and deprived of their right to respect for private and family life. The second report by the Committee concluded that as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting restrictions on visits, the temporary suspension of routine inspections, the likelihood of the increased use of restraint and solitary confinement and the vulnerability of those in detention to infection with COVID-19 (due to underlying health conditions and the infeasibility of social distancing) may add to, and further compound, the issues the Committee highlighted in its earlier report. In this document, the Government sets out its response to the Committee’s recommendations, including action already underway to ensure that people with a learning disability and autistic people receive the high-quality care and treatment we expect for everybody. Topics covered include: transforming care; ending harmful detention; the legal framework for detention; families as human rights defenders; conditions in places of detention; the Care Quality Commission; visits and the right to family life; use of restraint and solitary confinement; inspections; discharges; and data on COVID-19 infections and deaths.

Last updated on hub: 27 October 2020

COVID-19: summaries of key findings on children and young people's views

Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health

Findings from the Book Club which reviewed evidence relating to the experience, voice and views of children and young people about being in lockdown. Six young people aged 16-25 with a trainee and RCPCH staff formed the COVID-19 Book Club – the club has been meeting for an hour each week to review research and identify key themes. These are: mental health; education; employment; friends; family; health needs; information during the pandemic; virtual living. The Club sets three recovery priorities for urgent action by NHS Trusts and health boards: have child and youth accessible, friendly and relevant information about accessing health services and staying safe through the pandemic; increase access to mental health services to support children and young people impacted by the pandemic; and create the best virtual health experience possible thinking about access, confidentiality, rapport and holistic care.

Last updated on hub: 27 October 2020

Webinar: Responding to COVID-19 – the ethical framework for adult social care

Social Care Institute for Excellence

The Department of Health and Social Care’s Ethical Framework provides support to ongoing response planning and decision-making. This webinar shows you how to use the framework.

Last updated on hub: 26 October 2020

What is the role of social work and family liaison during global pandemics (such as COVID-19)?

This summary of evidence contains a comprehensive description of available research and key reference sources on the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on older people and the implications for social work.

Last updated on hub: 26 October 2020

What are the psychosocial needs of older people 65+ during the COVID-19 pandemic?

HSE Library

This summary of evidence contains a comprehensive description of available research and key reference sources on the psychosocial needs of older people during the pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 26 October 2020

What is the evidence of a relationship between socio-economic deprivation and the increased risk, if any, of infection with or death from COVID-19? Are there additional factors such as ethnicity, demography or population density which may amplify ...

HSE Library

This summary of evidence contains a comprehensive description of available research and key reference sources on the relationship between socio-economic deprivation, and additional factors such as ethnicity, demography or population density, and the increased risk of infection with or death from COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 26 October 2020