COVID-19 resources

Results 251 - 260 of 1409

COVID-19 and beyond: social work interventions for supporting homeless populations

International Social Work

During the COVID-19 emergency response of ‘staying the blazes home’ in Nova Scotia, Canada, frontline social workers worked tirelessly ‘out of the home’ to secure safe dwellings for those on the street, living in shelters, and/or precariously housed. When the province moves to the reopening and recovery stage, social work strategies will focus on reducing homeless people’s vulnerabilities, aiming to offer safe and dignified living.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

Recasting social workers as frontline in a socially accountable COVID-19 response

International Social Work

The COVID-19 pandemic has seen the engagement of a wide range of professionals in responding to clinical, social and economic issues. While the clinical expression of the pandemic has generated strong media portrayal of physicians and nurses as frontline workers, social workers – who play a key role in helping individuals and families in crisis – have not been similarly highlighted. The pandemic within a social accountability framework highlights important roles of both public officials and civic society in containment efforts. This article recognizes social workers as important actors in their representative and supportive role for civil society during COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

Pandemic sex workers’ resilience: COVID-19 crisis met with rapid responses by sex worker communities

International Social Work

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the inequality of social support systems worldwide, revealing the gaps that further marginalize vulnerable people. Despite the fact that sex workers are adversely affected by the pandemic, they are excluded from government relief and protection programmes as well as health services. Sex worker communities have developed rapid response strategies to support their peers in overcoming these challenges. Sex worker organizations all over the world have been working alongside other groups and communities to advocate for income and health support for all, and an end to repressive policing and state-sanctioned violence.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

COVID-19: health disparities and social determinants of health

International Social Work

Social determinants of health (SDH) describe how a person’s education, economic status, and overall environment affect their health outcomes. In the United States, a long history of resource inequities has existed, particularly for those from ethnic minority backgrounds. The following is a literature review of SDH from a historical context, current state, and through the lens of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

Social work practice education and training during the pandemic: disruptions and discoveries

International Social Work

The COVID-19 pandemic evoked a disruption to social work (SW) practice education and this brief note describes discoveries made in teaching SW practice virtually. One example is Virtual Practice Fridays, adapted to build SW practice competencies online, and another example is a re-designed course on cross-cultural SW practice using simulation-based learning.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

Reducing social worker burnout during COVID-19

International Social Work

Burnout has become part of everyday vocabulary. During the time of COVID-19, burnout is no longer exclusively associated with job-related stress. Our current climate is entrenched with unprecedented levels of varying societal stressors. Particularly during this time, social workers should prioritize their own mental health. This is necessary in order to have continued success when working with others. This article proposes interventions for social workers to implement in order to combat burnout during the time of COVID-19.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

Social work and COVID-19 pandemic: an action call

International Social Work

The social work profession, more than any other, is most hurt by the rampaging coronavirus (aka, COVID-19) pandemic given the scourge’s pernicious impact on society’s underserved and undervalued populations. More so, the pandemic has undermined the profession’s historical value commitment to social justice and human rights while overturning our insistence on the importance of human relationships. The purpose of this essay is to explicate the nexus between social work and COVID-19 pandemic. While noting the deafening silence of the profession in the global discourse of the pandemic, it advocates for the urgency of our response if our profession is to attain significant public value amid the current loss of lives and threats to human rights. Strategies for our professional action, in flattening the curve of the contagion, are laid out.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

The more you know, the less you fear: reflexive social work practices in times of COVID-19

International Social Work

In this article, we present the results of a strategy to disseminate best social work practices during periods of social lockdown in Spain, in a climate characterised by post-truth, misinformation and fake news. Social work is challenged with the task of delivering reliable and quality information aimed at building a better society. At the time of writing, Spain was one of the countries most affected by COVID-19, with one of the highest numbers of deaths per million inhabitants in the world. With the population in lockdown, our strategy was to design a series of innovative web seminars on both the subject and the procedures involved in social work, with the aim of sharing information and best practices to counter disinformation campaigns on social media. The results show the growing demand – both by citizens in general and students and professionals in particular – for reliable information in the field of professional practice. One of the priorities of digital social work must be to disseminate its results in the digital environment.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

Only connect: the impact of Covid-19 on older LGBT+ people

Opening Doors London

This report evaluates Opening Doors London’s (ODL) own response to the lockdown and explores the experiences and feelings of its members during this turbulent period. ODL provides information and support services specifically for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans (LGBT+) people over 50 in the UK. The report is based on a survey of ODL members, with input from the staff and volunteers who swung into action to reconfigure the delivery of vital services in order to continue supporting some of the most vulnerable members of the LGBT+ community. The survey has evidenced the extent of loneliness and social isolation experienced by a group of older LGBT+ people living in London, which has been exacerbated by the Covid-19 lockdown and worsened both physical and mental health. It also evidenced that the recalibration of ODL services meant that we were able to continue support for this vulnerable population. Findings include: 50% of respondents reported a negative impact on their psychological wellbeing; 18% felt much more depressed than usual; 23% experienced worsened physical health during lockdown; 37% felt more lonely than usual; 27% hardly ever or never had someone to talk to.

Last updated on hub: 18 November 2020

Renewing neighbourhood democracy: creating powerful communities

Localis

This report looks at initiatives to increase the power of communities and strengthen neighbourhood-level democracy, to understand how initiatives to strengthen community power and control as a means of achieving a better functioning local democracy and political economy might work in practice. An area of particular interest is post-pandemic reform to local governance structures in England, embodied in the forthcoming Local Recovery and Devolution White Paper, and how these reforms can open up space for greater community power. Its methodology is a combination of qualitative research – case studies, interviews and surveys – and critical analysis of how community empowerment has been approached nationwide. At its core, this report seeks to understand the current state of community empowerment in the UK and what changes should be made to ensure that the state – both local and central – can best support all communities to prosper and thrive. In conclusion, the report prescribes some immediate policy approaches that could facilitate community empowerment and some more general principles to take forward in both national and local government. From the studies, some key principles for creating powerful communities can be drawn: a relational approach to governance; strong networking and communication systems; dedication to building capacity; work rooted in listening to communities; and a willingness to cede some power and control and a culture that is engaged and facilitative.

Last updated on hub: 18 November 2020