COVID-19 resources

Results 271 - 280 of 1447

Coronavirus and me: experiences of children from Black, Asian and minority ethnic groups in Wales

Children's Commissioner for Wales

This report includes the experiences of nearly 1,500 children from Black, Asian and minority ethnic groups in Wales, which were captured during the height of lockdown in May 2020. Experiences were shared as part of a Wales-wide survey led by the Commissioner which saw nearly 24,000 three to eighteen year olds take part. The report shows statistically significant results indicating disproportionately negative experiences for BAME children and young people when compared to White Welsh or British children and young people in Wales. Compared to white Welsh or white British children, 7-11 year old BAME children were more likely to say that: they needed more information and help for things like online school work, speaking to friends and family online, feeling safe at home; they were worried about their family having enough food; they were playing less; that libraries and community centres closing affected their learning; they wanted more information on Coronavirus. They were also less likely to say they knew how to get support to feel happy and well and to say they felt happy ‘most of the time’, or safe ‘most of the time’. Compared to white Welsh or white British Children, 12-18 year old BAME children were: more likely to say they want help to eat healthy food and stay active; less likely to say they were exercising outdoors; more likely to say they were worried about falling behind with their learning; more likely to say they were worried about their family having enough food; more likely to say they want more information on the rules on keeping safe; and less likely to say they felt safe ‘most of the time’.

Last updated on hub: 06 January 2021

Coronavirus and social relationships and support for vulnerable groups: 2017 to 2018 and 2018 to 2019

The Office for National Statistics

This statistical release looks at the ways in which vulnerable groups, including older adults and those with a self-defined disability or who are Equality Act Disabled, normally receive support from their family, friends and wider community. This could be having help with shopping, providing or cooking meals or looking after grandchildren. It aims to develop a greater understanding of how a period of isolation, such as during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, might impact those in need of extra support. Data is at the UK level. Where this has not been possible, England-level data have been used.

Last updated on hub: 14 April 2020

Coronavirus and the social impacts on different ethnic groups in the UK: 2020

The Office for National Statistics

This release uses data from the UK Household Longitudinal Study (UKHLS) matched with data from the Understanding Society: COVID-19 Study, 2020 to explore the social impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic initial period of lockdown on the health, employment, and living standards of people of different ethnicities in the UK. The release also uses data from the Wealth and Assets Survey (WAS) to understand the financial resilience of different ethnic groups in Great Britain before the pandemic. Main points include: most ethnic groups in the UK experienced a worsening of their self-reported mental health between 2019 and April 2020 (based on their GHQ-12 score); the mental well-being of those in the Indian ethnic group in the UK may have been particularly affected by the pandemic as they reported both greater difficulty with sleep over worry between 2019 and the initial period of lockdown (April 2020) and had higher scores than other groups on a measure of self-reported mental health difficulties (GHQ-12); prior to the pandemic, households headed by someone of Black African or Other Black ethnicity were significantly less likely to have enough formal financial assets to cover a drop in employment income than those from most other ethnic groups; after adjusting for age, around half of working-age adults of White British (46%) and Other White (51%) ethnicities in paid work, both immediately before and during the first period of lockdown, in the UK, reported a decrease in their weekly hours worked in April 2020, compared with one-third of their counterparts of Indian (33%) and Black, African, Caribbean or Black British (33%) ethnicities; in April 2020 in the UK, over a quarter (27%) of those from Black, African, Caribbean or Black British ethnic groups reported finding it very or quite difficult to get by financially, significantly more than those from White Irish (6%), Other White (7%), Indian (8%) and Pakistani or Bangladeshi (13%) ethnic groups.

Last updated on hub: 16 December 2020

Coronavirus and the social impacts on disabled people in Great Britain: September 2020

The Office for National Statistics

Indicators from the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey on the social impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on disabled people in Great Britain. This release uses two waves of survey results covering 24 September to 4 October 2020 and includes indicators broken down by impairment type. Insights from qualitative research commissioned by the Cabinet Office Disability Unit and conducted by Policy Lab with disabled people help illustrate how the survey indicators can be experienced by disabled people in day-to-day life. The data shows that over 8 in 10 (83%) disabled people compared with around 7 in 10 (71%) non-disabled people said they were “very worried” or “somewhat worried” about the effect that the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic was having on their life in September 2020. Around 5 in 10 (50%) disabled people who were receiving medical care before the coronavirus pandemic began, indicated that they were either currently receiving treatment for only some of their conditions (29%), or that their treatment had been cancelled or not started (22%), compared with less than 3 in 10 (27%) of non-disabled people who had a physical or mental health condition or illness and were receiving care before the pandemic. All well-being ratings of disabled people remained poorer in September 2020 compared with a similar period prior to the coronavirus pandemic; almost half (47%) of disabled people reported high anxiety (a score of 6 out of 10 or higher) in September 2020 compared with less than a third (29%) of non-disabled people. A larger proportion of disabled people (83%) than non-disabled people (77%) supported “strict” or “very strict” enforcement by police of government rules aimed at combatting the coronavirus such as social distancing.

Last updated on hub: 16 November 2020

Coronavirus and the social impacts on older people in Great Britain: 3 April to 10 May 2020

The Office for National Statistics

Indicators from the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey on the social impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on older people in Great Britain. The data shows that among older people (aged 60 years and over) who were worried about the effect the coronavirus (COVID-19) was having on their lives, their main concerns were being unable to make plans in general, personal travel plans such as holidays and their own wellbeing. Of those who said their wellbeing had been affected by the coronavirus, the most common ways older people said it had been affected were being worried about the future, feeling stressed or anxious and being bored. Staying in touch with family and friends remotely was the main way those aged 60 years and over said they were coping whilst staying at home, followed by gardening, reading and exercise, with those aged in their 60s and 70s equally as likely as younger age groups to say that exercise was helping them to cope. People aged in their 60s and 70s were more likely to have checked on neighbours who might need help three or more times and they were equally as likely to have gone shopping or done other tasks for neighbours at least one or two times as those aged under 60 years. People aged in their 60s were the least optimistic about how long it will take for life to return to normal, with a higher proportion saying it will take more than a year or that life will never return to normal, than those aged under 60 years and those aged 70 years and over.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Coronavirus and the social impacts on young people in Great Britain: 3 April to 10 May 2020

The Office for National Statistics

Indicators from the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey on the impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on young people in Great Britain. The data shows that among young people (aged 16 to 29 years) who were worried about the effect the coronavirus (COVID-19) was having on their lives, their main concerns were the effects on schools or universities, their wellbeing, work, and household finances. Young people who reported that their wellbeing was being affected were much more likely than either those aged 30 to 59 years or those aged 60 years and over to report being bored and lonely; they were also much more likely to say the lockdown was making their mental health worse (42 per cent). Young people were generally more optimistic than the older age groups about how long they expected the effect of the pandemic to last, and over half of them reported they expect their lives to return to normal within six months.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

Coronavirus and us

Children's Commissioner for Wales

This report provides some analysis on children’s rights in Wales during the pandemic and shares how the Children’s Commissioner and their team have responded to the pandemic. It gives an overview on the extent to which Wales, and the Commissioner, have met the United Nations eleven priorities for children in the pandemic. These are: 1) consider the health, social, educational, economic and recreational impacts of the pandemic on the rights of the child; 2) explore alternative and creative solutions for children to enjoy their rights to rest, leisure, recreation and cultural and artistic activities; 3) ensure that online learning does not exacerbate existing inequalities or replace student-teacher interaction; 4) activate immediate measures to ensure that children are fed nutritious food; 5) maintain the provision of basic services for children including healthcare, water, sanitation and birth registration; 6) define core child protection services as essential; 7) protect children whose vulnerability is further increased by exceptional circumstances caused by the pandemic; 8) release children in all forms of detention, whenever possible; 9) prevent the arrest or detention of children for violating guidance and directives relating to Covid19; 10) disseminate accurate information about Covid-19 in formats that are child-friendly and accessible to all children; and 11) provide opportunities for children’s views to be heard and taken into account in decision making processes on the pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 30 September 2020

Coronavirus Bill

UK Parliament

This Bill makes provisions in connection with coronavirus (COVID-19). Key health and social care provisions in the Bill include: the emergency and temporary registration of health professionals and social workers; temporary modification of mental health and mental capacity legislation; changes in NHS and local authority care and support; and other public health measures.

Last updated on hub: 26 March 2020

Coronavirus Bill: explanatory notes

Department of Health and Social Care

Explanatory notes produced by the Department for Health and Social Care to assist readers of the Coronavirus Bill, as introduced in the House of Commons on 19 March 2020 (Bill 122) to combat coronavirus (COVID-19). The Notes explain what each part of the Bill will mean in practice; provide background information on the development of policy; and provide additional information on how the Bill will affect existing legislation in this area. The Notes are not intended to be a comprehensive description of the Bill. Key health and social care provisions in the Bill include: the emergency and temporary registration of health professionals and social workers; temporary modification of mental health and mental capacity legislation; and changes in NHS and local authority care and support.

Last updated on hub: 26 March 2020

Coronavirus Bill: health and social care measures

House of Commons Library

A briefing paper providing information on the key health and social care measures in the Coronavirus Bill, which was introduced in the House of Commons on 19 March 2020 to combat the coronavirus (COVID-19). It includes information on the Bill’s health and social care workforce measures, including provisions on emergency registration, indemnity cover, emergency volunteers and NHS pensions. It looks at measures to reduce administrative requirements on health and social care staff, including enabling local authorities to prioritise care for people with the most pressing needs. It also outlines changes to mental health and mental capacity legislation in the Bill.

Last updated on hub: 23 March 2020