COVID-19 resources

Results 301 - 310 of 750

Covid-19: social care’s forgotten workers — they matter too

British Medical Association

Drawing on the lessons from COVID-19 pandemic, this article argues that the social care sector can no longer be seen as low skilled and deserving of low pay and needs to become a system in its own right—funded and valued in its own right, a “single system” redesigned around the care required by individuals. A system that people will all recognise, value, and be proud of, like the NHS.

Last updated on hub: 09 July 2020

Care homes: outbreak testing and regular testing

Department of Health and Social Care

Sets out the next stages in the COVID-19 testing strategy for adult social care to be rolled out from 6 July. This letter to the Directors of Public Health and Directors of Adult Social Services covers outbreak management and rapid testing for care homes with outbreaks; retesting in care homes without outbreaks; extra care and supported living; and domiciliary care.

Last updated on hub: 09 July 2020

Which way next? How local area coordination can help us beyond this crisis towards a better future for all

Local Area Coordination Network

This paper outlines the local area coordination approach and shares reflections on its impact during COVID-19 pandemic. It explores how the approach has adapted to meet new challenges by: supporting people and families to achieve their vision of a good life, to use their gifts and make their contribution; helping communities to be self-supporting and to flourish; and supporting systems transformation, building bridges and strengthening relationships between citizens, communities and services. The paper argues that the current COVID-19 crisis highlights much of the theory and logic that underpins the local area coordination approach – it fosters hyper local neighbourliness and trusting relationships between communities and local service infrastructure, which in turn enable community-led groups to use their natural capacity to respond quickly and effectively during the crisis. The paper also explores how local area coordination can support multilevel recovery, renewal and rebuilding efforts by nurturing and sustaining the surge of community action. It concludes by outlining how the approach can and should be a key piece of the new puzzle. It brings to life visions of more equitable, cooperative localities where people help people first with services in place as an essential, well-resourced and supportive backup to a functional society.

Last updated on hub: 08 July 2020

Adult social care after Covid-19: ADASS

Local Government Information Unit

Focuses on the future of adult social care and the lessons emerging from the COVID-19 pandemic, setting out the key messages from recent reports by the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS). As well as its annual budget survey, ADASS has produced a companion report on the impact of Covid-19 on adult social care and its finances in England. The reports show the range of problems facing adult social care in responding to Covid-19. They highlight the tragedy of so many people in care homes dying from the disease due to rapid discharge, the inequalities which have led to vulnerable people being badly affected and the courage of staff, largely female and many Black and minority ethnic, in continuing to support people throughout. The reports provide recommendations for what needs to be done for the next stages of the virus in the autumn – a key issue is to ensure safe hospital discharge. They also make recommendations for the future of adult social care – over the next two years the directors of adult of social care want to see sufficient ring-fenced finance to create stability and allow transformation with the NHS to continue; a new employment deal for care workers; care market reform; and full engagement on a cross-party basis to design a sustainable future for social care. This would be a bridging period for essential reforms to take place until a long-term solution can be agreed.

Last updated on hub: 08 July 2020

Local government and Covid-19: social care, a neglected service

Local Government Information Unit

This briefing looks at the state of the social care sector pre-pandemic and the impact that the virus has had on care homes and domiciliary care. There were over 4,000 deaths involving COVID-19 in care homes England in the two weeks up to 28 April – over four times the number recorded in residential and nursing homes up to that point and it is not clear whether the virus has yet reached its peak in this sector. The social care sector has been underfunded and under-valued by successive governments and was in a parlous state before the pandemic took hold. The briefing discusses: rates of infections and deaths in social care settings; continuing concerns about lack of adequate PPE provision to both care homes and domiciliary care providers; lack of testing for both care workers and residents/clients and what this means for the safety of social care provision; the additional costs of COVID-19 on local authorities and care providers in an already underfunded and unstable sector; and the lessons that can be learnt.

Last updated on hub: 08 July 2020

Rapid review: contact

What Works Centre for Children's Social Care

Examines the evidence on how contact can be managed virtually and the implications for foster carers, adoptive parents, family members and children. In the context of the COVID-19 Pandemic, there is a desire by local authorities to ensure that contact between family members is maintained, but that, wherever possible, it does not pose an increased infection risk. The findings suggest that increased contact between children and relatives could be beneficial or detrimental – more clear evidence is needed on this and social workers should assess on a case-by-case basis; contact via technology between service users and social workers may be two-way, whereby service users may also reach out at times that are convenient for them – however, the social worker should also establish boundaries to avoid burnout and maintain professionalism; there may need to be more thought given around enabling families to facilitate video-calling during these times, particularly to people who are at risk of being technology-constrained; children placed in residential or foster care may be more likely to be separated from siblings, and therefore facilitating contact for these groups of children and young people should be prioritised.

Last updated on hub: 08 July 2020

Rapid review: home visits and remote social work

What Works Centre for Children's Social Care

Summarises the evidence on how children’s social workers can safely conduct necessary home visits during the COVID-19 epidemic. While there is a limited body of research on home visiting in social work, the findings of this rapid review indicate that: therapeutic work can be conducted effectively remotely, but this is skilled work requiring training; relationship quality is an important determinant of the success of online work, and so should be considered alongside other risk/protective factors; video communication is likely to be more successful where possible than telephone conversations, as fewer non-verbal cues are lost; where home visits occur, they will be improved by clear decision making and the empowerment of social workers; professional boundaries and standards may be challenged by remote working with families, and supervision by managers should consider this.

Last updated on hub: 08 July 2020

Child and family social work during the COVID-19 pandemic: a rapid review of the evidence in relation to remote leadership

What Works Centre for Children's Social Care

A review of the evidence on barriers and facilitators to effective remote leadership. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and associated lockdown, one key challenge for those in leadership roles is how best to support and manage their teams when working remotely. The review identifies five facilitators: leadership style – leaders need to be flexible, and provide task-oriented and relationship-based support; communication – needs to be regular and allow for the sharing of ideas; team organisation – leaders need to pay special attention to team coordination and set specific goals for team members; team cohesion – leaders need to be visible to all team members and facilitate (non-mandatory) social as well as work-related activities; and focus on team performance – leaders need to set clear goals, provide regular feedback and allow more time and flexibility around task completion. The evidence also suggests four main barriers to effective remote leadership, including: diluted and unequal leadership – the impact of the leader is likely to be diluted and previous methods of working may not be as effective, the demands of remote leadership may not be felt equally by female and male leaders; communication – there will be an absence of opportunities for informal discussions; team cohesion – conflict or fault-lines between team members may emerge; team performance – individuals will find it harder to collaborate and overall team performance may be less productive than normal.

Last updated on hub: 08 July 2020

Webinar recording: Building back from COVID-19

Social Care Institute for Excellence

During and after the COVID-19 crisis, we need to create the right conditions for our practitioners to be efficient and productive, so that they are freed up to spend more time with people.

Last updated on hub: 07 July 2020

Impact of easing COVID-19 lockdown restrictions on domestic violence and abuse

Social Care Institute for Excellence

A quick guide developed to provide practical ideas for social care professionals about the impact on domestic violence and abuse as lockdown eases.

Last updated on hub: 07 July 2020