COVID-19 resources

Results 321 - 330 of 1465

COVID 19: safe and rapid recruitment

Skills for Care

Brings together guidance to support safe and rapid recruitment of social care staff during the COVID-19 pandemic and signposts to relevant resources. In these unprecedented times, it is important that the safety and wellbeing of people using care services remains a priority. The guiding principles set out in the guidance are intended to address the additional workforce recruitment challenges that employers of all sizes face. They cover: value-based recruitment; recruiting from the local community; robust employment checks; training, sustaining and retaining; and distance recruitment and virtual interviewing.

Last updated on hub: 29 June 2020

COVID on three continents: how local children’s organisations in Africa, Europe and South America are adapting to the coronavirus challenge

Journal of Children's Services

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to share anecdotally how the pandemic is affecting children, families and some of the frontline local services that support them across three continents. Design/methodology/approach: Three members of Family for Every Child across three continents detail some of the day-to-day challenges they are facing in their work with children and families as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Findings: Social distancing and fear of the virus are hampering front line organisations in Africa, Europe and South America, bringing additional challenges to keeping children safe. Originality/value: These three case studies give a snapshot of the issues faced by three non-governmental children’s organisations over three continents during July 2020.

Last updated on hub: 30 December 2020

COVID-19 - infection prevention and control in health and social care settings - an overview

Health Protection Scotland

To support health and social care staff involved in the COVID-19 response, Health Protection Scotland (part of Public Health Scotland), NHS National Services Scotland and NHS Education for Scotland have produced a short recorded webinar.

Last updated on hub: 22 July 2020

COVID-19 Adult Safeguarding Insight Project: findings and discussion

Local Government Association

Findings of a project aimed at creating a national picture about safeguarding adults’ activity during the COVID-19 pandemic. The report is based on the analysis of data submitted on a voluntary basis by local authorities; in all, 92 councils participated in the insight project – over 60 per cent of single tier and county councils in England. In general, safeguarding concerns dropped markedly during the initial weeks of the COVID-19 lockdown period, only to return to and then exceed normal levels in June 2020. The trend of Section 42 enquiries showed a similar decline during the initial weeks of the COVID-19 lockdown period and upturn in June, although the June upturn was not as great. The effects of COVID-19 and lockdown on safeguarding activity are localised and may vary across England as the pandemic impacted the country unevenly. The percentage distribution of types of abuse within Section 42 enquiries did not appear to change considerably overall, although there is some evidence that some forms of abuse, particularly domestic abuse, increased slightly overall and significantly within some councils, as well as psychological abuse and self-neglect. The percentage of Section 42 enquiries where the risk is located in the individual’s own home has increased markedly since the start of the COVID-19 lockdown period, with evidence from participants that this is a direct result of the confinement of people in their homes. During the lockdown period, while dealing with the unprecedented challenges of the pandemic, some councils developed innovations in their practices and systems. Examples provided by participating councils in the qualitative data, are described in this report.

Last updated on hub: 26 January 2021

Covid-19 adult social care provision: stories of promise

Think Local Act Personal

Information and examples of emerging practice during the Coronavirus pandemic. This collection charts the multitude of creative responses that have evolved to support people with adult care and support in communities across England as a result of the pandemic. Each example is collated under a different theme that relates to provider, council or community activity such as commissioning, asset-based approaches or digital solutions. Themes include: keeping people connected; digital innovation; information and advice; markets and commissioning; self-directed support; and workforce.

Last updated on hub: 20 July 2020

COVID-19 and AgeTech

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults

Purpose: This paper aims to provide an overview of the emerging AgeTech sector and highlight key areas for research and development that have emerged under COVID-19, as well as some of the challenges to real-world implementation. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is a commentary on emerging issues in the AgeTech sector, with particular reference to COVID-19. Information used in this paper is drawn from the Canadian AGE-WELL network. Findings: The COVID-19 pandemic has particularly impacted older adults. Technology has increasingly been seen as a solution to support older adults during this time. AgeTech refers to the use of existing and emerging advanced technologies, such as digital media, information and communication technologies (ICTs), mobile technologies, wearables and smart home systems, to help keep older adults connected and to deliver health and community services. Research limitations/implications: Despite the potential of AgeTech, key challenges remain such as structural barriers to larger-scale implementation, the need to focus on quality of service rather than crisis management and addressing the digital divide. Practical implications: AgeTech helps older adults to stay healthy and active, increases their safety and security, supports independent living and reduces isolation. In particular, technology can support older adults and caregivers in their own homes and communities and meet the desire of most older adults to age in place. Social implications: AgeTech is helpful in assisting older adults to stay connected. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown the importance of the informal social connections and supports within families, communities and voluntary organizations. Originality/value: The last months have seen a huge upsurge in COVID-19-related research and development, as funding organizations, research institutions and companies pivot to meet the challenges thrown up by the pandemic. This paper looks at the potential role of technology to support older adults and caregivers.

Last updated on hub: 29 December 2020

COVID-19 and beyond: social work interventions for supporting homeless populations

International Social Work

During the COVID-19 emergency response of ‘staying the blazes home’ in Nova Scotia, Canada, frontline social workers worked tirelessly ‘out of the home’ to secure safe dwellings for those on the street, living in shelters, and/or precariously housed. When the province moves to the reopening and recovery stage, social work strategies will focus on reducing homeless people’s vulnerabilities, aiming to offer safe and dignified living.

Last updated on hub: 19 November 2020

COVID‐19 and care homes in England: What happened and why?

Social Policy and Administration

In the context of very high mortality and infection rates, this article examines the policy response to COVID‐19 in care homes for older people in the UK, with particular focus on England in the first 10 weeks of the pandemic. The timing and content of the policy response as well as different possible explanations for what happened are considered. Undertaking a forensic analysis of policy in regard to the overall plan, monitoring and protection as well as funding and resources, the first part lays bare the slow, late and inadequate response to the risk and reality of COVID‐19 in care homes as against that in the National Health Service (NHS). A two‐pronged, multidimensional explanation is offered: structural, sectoral specificities; political and socio‐cultural factors. Amongst the relevant structural factors are the institutionalised separation from the health system, the complex system of provision and policy for adult social care, widespread market dependence. There is also the fact that logistical difficulties were exacerbated by years of austerity and resource cutting and a weak regulatory tradition of the care home sector. The effects of a series of political and cultural factors are also highlighted. As well as little mobilisation of the sector and low public commitment to and knowledge of social care, there is a pattern of Conservative government trying to divest the state of responsibilities in social care. This would support an interpretation in terms of policy avoidance as well as a possible political calculation by government that its policies towards the care sector and care homes would be less important and politically damaging than those for the NHS.

Last updated on hub: 31 August 2020

COVID‐19 and care homes in England: What happened and why?

Social Policy and Administration

In the context of very high mortality and infection rates, this article examines the policy response to COVID‐19 in care homes for older people in the UK, with particular focus on England in the first 10 weeks of the pandemic. The timing and content of the policy response as well as different possible explanations for what happened are considered. Undertaking a forensic analysis of policy in regard to the overall plan, monitoring and protection as well as funding and resources, the first part lays bare the slow, late and inadequate response to the risk and reality of COVID‐19 in care homes as against that in the National Health Service (NHS). A two‐pronged, multidimensional explanation is offered: structural, sectoral specificities; political and socio‐cultural factors. Amongst the relevant structural factors are the institutionalised separation from the health system, the complex system of provision and policy for adult social care, widespread market dependence. There is also the fact that logistical difficulties were exacerbated by years of austerity and resource cutting and a weak regulatory tradition of the care home sector. The effects of a series of political and cultural factors are also highlighted. As well as little mobilisation of the sector and low public commitment to and knowledge of social care, there is a pattern of Conservative government trying to divest the state of responsibilities in social care. This would support an interpretation in terms of policy avoidance as well as a possible political calculation by government that its policies towards the care sector and care homes would be less important and politically damaging than those for the NHS.

Last updated on hub: 24 November 2020

COVID-19 and care homes: update paper, 23 September 2020

This paper reviews the latest evidence on the transmission of Covid-19 in care homes. It focuses specifically on the relative risk of each of four routes of ingress of infection to the care home (hospital discharge, staff, visitor (professional or domestic) and community admissions) as well as the route of transmission within care homes once infection has entered, for which more detailed genomic studies are critical. Key findings include: although staff-to-staff transmission has been observed to have been a contributory factor in specific outbreaks, it is important not to generalise to all outbreaks and emphasise one route over another without clear evidence – studies undertaken so far indicate that multiple introductions are common; retrospective genomic analysis and seropositive studies in care homes find evidence for multiple routes of virus ingress to care homes, but are not systematic enough to quantify the relative frequency of different routes of ingress; evidence of staff to staff transmission has emerged in the genomic analysis (high confidence); weak evidence on hospital discharge and modelling the impact of visitors does not suggest a dominant causal link to outbreaks from these sources; public health measures that reduce community incidence could be effective in reducing ingress into care homes; asymptomatic or atypically symptomatic presentation in residents and staff mean that ingress may be hidden for a number of generations of disease; sequencing community tests to understand the comparator population is critical for the future.

Last updated on hub: 27 October 2020