COVID-19 resources

Results 371 - 380 of 601

Lifting lockdown: how to approach a coronavirus exit strategy

Institute for Government

This report warns that the government’s five tests for starting to lift the coronavirus lockdown are not a good enough guide to the longer-term exit strategy. It argues that the government must set out new tests which explain how it will balance economic and health concerns against each other in lifting the restrictions. The paper also recommends providing enough capacity to test those who might be infected and trace anyone with whom they have come into contact; lifting restrictions first for those businesses that are best able to implement social distancing in the workplace and for those sectors where the longer-term harms from the shutdown are likely to be most severe; and introducing encouragement and incentives, such as tax incentives or reducing support for furloughed workers, to bring people and businesses out of lockdown.

Last updated on hub: 12 June 2020

Liverpool City Council: sustaining intergenerational initiatives

Liverpool City Council

Practice example about how the Inter-generational Sustainable Skills Exchange funded by Liverpool City Council has continued to operate during the COVID-19 pandemic. The service brings together socially isolated older adults and allow them to teach their life skills to parents and children in their community. Also covers some of the key challenges and learning points to date.

Last updated on hub: 16 July 2020

Living grief and bereavement: a booklet for anyone working with carers of people with dementia

This booklet aims to give professionals an understanding of the feelings of grief and bereavement that those caring for people with dementia can experience. It shows that carers can experience complex feelings of grief when the person they care for is still alive, and that these feelings can last long after the person dies. The booklet draws on the views of over 100 carers across the UK who participated in an online survey and focus groups. Carers views covered feelings of loss and grief, a loss of their own identity, their experiences of support, and advice for professional.

Last updated on hub: 04 June 2020

Living in poverty was bad for your health before COVID-19

The Health Foundation

This long read looks at the link between health and income. It explores the nature of the economic shocks experienced in recent years, including those stemming from COVID-19, and the consequences these might have on people’s health. It then considers how the current crisis may be used to build a fairer and healthier society. The paper highlights the extent to which income is associated with health – people in the bottom 40% of the income distribution are almost twice as likely to report poor health than those in the top 20% and poverty in particular is associated with worse health outcomes. Furthermore, income and health can both affect each other – lower income is associated with more ‘stressors’ which can harm health and allow fewer opportunities for good health. Poor health can limit the opportunity for good and stable employment and so affect income. The UK entered the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and related economic shock from a starting position of stagnant income growth and low levels of financial resilience – the pattern of employment loss and furloughing by income suggests that the future economic consequences of COVID-19 may be borne by those on lower incomes. The paper argues that providing support to bolster people’s incomes for as long as necessary should remain a priority and the Government’s current package of support should be expanded. In addition, the ‘levelling up’ agenda should include investment to improve the health of the whole population and level up health outcomes.

Last updated on hub: 29 July 2020

Living standards, poverty and inequality in the UK: 2020

Institute for Fiscal Studies

This report examines how living standards – most commonly measured by households’ incomes – were changing in the UK up to approximately the eve of the current COVID-19 crisis, using the latest official household income data covering years up to 2018–19. In particular, the report focuses on how this differed for different groups, and what this meant for poverty and inequality. It provides a comprehensive account of household income before the pandemic, including for groups who have subsequently had their economic lives disrupted. The report finds that the COVID-19 crisis hit at a time when income growth had already been extremely disappointing for some years, with the main culprit for the latest reduction in real income growth being a rise in inflation from 2016; overall relative poverty was 22% in 2018−19, and it has fluctuated little since the early 2000s – relative child poverty has increased by 3 percentage points, which represents the most sustained rise in relative child poverty since the early 1990s; absolute poverty was 20% in 2018−19 – virtually unchanged over the last two years; workers whose livelihoods look most at risk during the COVID-19 crisis already tended to have relatively low incomes, and were relatively likely to be in poverty, prior to the onset of the crisis; in 2018−19, only 12% of non-pensioners lived in households with no one in paid work, down by a third from 18% in 1994–95 – this progress is highly likely to be undermined by the COVID-19 pandemic; despite temporary increases in benefits announced in response to the pandemic, the benefits system in 2020 provides less support to out-of-work households than in 2011.

Last updated on hub: 20 July 2020

Local government and Covid-19: social care, a neglected service

Local Government Information Unit

This briefing looks at the state of the social care sector pre-pandemic and the impact that the virus has had on care homes and domiciliary care. There were over 4,000 deaths involving COVID-19 in care homes England in the two weeks up to 28 April – over four times the number recorded in residential and nursing homes up to that point and it is not clear whether the virus has yet reached its peak in this sector. The social care sector has been underfunded and under-valued by successive governments and was in a parlous state before the pandemic took hold. The briefing discusses: rates of infections and deaths in social care settings; continuing concerns about lack of adequate PPE provision to both care homes and domiciliary care providers; lack of testing for both care workers and residents/clients and what this means for the safety of social care provision; the additional costs of COVID-19 on local authorities and care providers in an already underfunded and unstable sector; and the lessons that can be learnt.

Last updated on hub: 08 July 2020

Local responses on supporting care leavers during COVID-19

Department for Education

This document looks at how local authorities are responding to the additional challenges they are facing in supporting care leavers during COVID-19. It sets out key issues and provides examples of local practice identified through consultations with the Department of Education's independent National Implementation Adviser for Care Leavers. Some of the examples were gathered before the Department published operational guidance for Children’s Social Services and before the Education Secretary’s announcement of support for care leavers on 19 April. Issues identified included: loneliness; financial and practical support; accommodation; and providing support to Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children.

Last updated on hub: 08 June 2020

Lockdown’s side effect: mental health deterioration of people affected by dementia, with third ‘giving up’

Alzheimer's Society

Sets out findings from a survey of around 2,000 people affected by dementia revealing the devastating impact coronavirus has had on their mental health, with a third living with dementia reporting apathy or a sense of ‘giving up’. Nearly half of respondents said that lockdown has had a ‘negative impact’ on their mental health. Around half of unpaid carers also reported that loved ones with the condition have experienced stress, anxiety or depression.

Last updated on hub: 21 July 2020

Loneliness in the lockdown

Wales Centre for Public Policy

Loneliness and social isolation have a significant impact on public health and wellbeing. Social distancing to slow the spread of the coronavirus (Covid-19) simultaneously increases the risk of loneliness and social isolation and rules out many existing approaches to tackling them. This note examines possible approaches to tackling loneliness during the lockdown. It provides an overview of approaches to strengthening social contact, including those enabled by digital technologies; highlights lessons from previous approaches that have reduced loneliness and social isolation among groups who have long felt socially distanced, such as carers, those with physical mobility restrictions and those with mental ill-health; and suggests ways that public services in Wales and elsewhere can adapt these strategies to support communities through the pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 20 May 2020

Loneliness, social isolation and COVID-19: practical advice

Local Government Association

This briefing provides advice for Directors of Public Health and those leading the response to loneliness and social isolation issues arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. The advice highlights the importance in intervening early to tackle loneliness and social isolation to prevent more costly health and care needs from developing, as well as helping community resilience and recovery. This can only be done at the local level through partnerships, with councils playing a role, as they own most of the assets where community action could or should take place, such as parks, libraries and schools. A table summarises the main risk factors of loneliness and social isolation, including those specific to COVID-19. It then briefly sets out councils’ role in working with partners and using community assets to address and help prevent loneliness and social isolation; looks at the steps councils were taking prior to the pandemic; and the changes that may be needed as a result of COVID-19 and opportunities to embed positive changes, such as greater awareness about the impact of personal behaviours on mental wellbeing.

Last updated on hub: 21 May 2020